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Sun, 30 Apr 2017
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Saturn

'Disturbances' in Saturn's rings snapped by Cassini (PHOTO)

© NASA
The Cassini space probe, which has been studying Saturn since 2004, has snapped a stunning photo of "disturbances" in the gas giant's rings in much higher resolution than ever before.

The unmanned spacecraft captured the image from a distance of nearly 70,000 miles (111,340 kilometers) as it cruised past on March 22.

Info

Deranged Dating: Cometary Carbon-14

© NASA/JPL-Caltech/W. Reach (SSC/Caltech)
Earth Scientists apparently accept radiocarbon dating as the gospel truth.

However, if the Settled Science that supports radiocarbon dating is really just one huge homogenised hodgepodge then acquiescent Earth Scientists are simply being misdirected and left to flounder in the dark.
This would go some way towards explaining why so many Earth Scientists are gainfully employed chasing their tails.

Thus, the mainstream gained the scientific kudos associated with Radiocarbon Dating whilst [simultaneously] wrestling control of the Settled Science away from Willard Libby by imposing a calibration curve that was approved by the mainstream.

Sadly, this hybrid, high jacked and half-baked Settled Science has now degenerated into a recursive [incestuous] feedback loop where dendrochronology calibrates Radiocarbon Dating which, in its turn, is used to calibrate dendrochronology.

See: Carbon 14 - Libby's Ring
© Malaga Bay
Amongst the many issues associated with the Settled Science of radiocarbon dating there is the curious case of Catastrophic Cometary Carbon-14.

Arguably, the burning up of a cometary debris train in the Earth's atmosphere would significantly enhance the level of atmospheric Carbon-14.

Top Secret

Telekinesis: A real life psychokinetic in action


Nina Kulagina was a Russian housewife who was documented by scientists as being able to move objects with the power of her mind.
Psychokinesis is the ability to move material objects using the power of mind alone. It may sound like the stuff of science fiction, but there is ample evidence to suggest that humans are capable of moving objects with their minds. Should this prove true, it would be fascinating to say the least, and would suggest that all human beings have this potential. Of course, the implications of psychokinesis for humanity as a whole would be immense, and we as a species may not be ready to handle them just yet. We would need to be at a pretty peaceful place within to harness such an ability responsibly. This is why new discoveries are useless without a good consciousness behind their use, and why we say real change comes from within.

What type of evidence is there? In today's world, something must be peer-reviewed in order to be considered credible. The unfortunate part about this is that science as an institution has become highly politicized, plagued by corruption and the publication of false data. When it comes to topics within the realm of parapsychology, however, results are more reliable. No agenda is driving these experiments, and so they are conducted and their results measured objectively — unlike many corporately funded medical studies. Scientific fraud is important to mention any time we are talking about 'peer-reviewed' scientific literature, so the next time you decide to brush off other publications (even though they are usually all 'peer-reviewed' in some form), take a second to think about this fact. You can see specific examples of this corruption in this article.

Music

Understanding the roots of human musicality

Researchers are using multiple methods to study the origins of humans' capacity to process and produce music, and there's no shortage of debate about the results.

Getting to Santa María, Bolivia, is no easy feat. Home to a farming and foraging society, the village is located deep in the Amazon rainforest and is accessible only by river. The area lacks electricity and running water, and the Tsimane' people who live there make contact with the outside world only occasionally, during trips to neighboring towns. But for auditory researcher Josh McDermott, this remoteness was central to the community's scientific appeal.

In 2015, the MIT scientist loaded a laptop, headphones, and a gasoline generator into a canoe and pushed off from the Amazonian town of San Borja, some 50 kilometers downriver from Santa María. Together with collaborator Ricardo Godoy, an anthropologist at Brandeis University, McDermott planned to carry out experiments to test whether the Tsimane' could discern certain combinations of musical tones, and whether they preferred some over others. The pair wanted to address a long-standing question in music research: Are the features of musical perception seen across cultures innate, or do similarities in preferences observed around the world mirror the spread of Western culture and its (much-better-studied) music?

2 + 2 = 4

Brain hardwired to respond to others' itching: Mouse study

Researchers discover why mice scratch in response to other mice scratching.

© Michael Worful
Itching is a highly contagious behavior. When we see someone scratch, we’re likely to scratch, too. New research from the Washington University Center for the Study of Itch shows contagious itching is hardwired in the brain.
Some behaviors — yawning and scratching, for example — are socially contagious, meaning if one person does it, others are likely to follow suit. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that socially contagious itching is hardwired in the brain.

Studying mice, the scientists have identified what occurs in the brain when a mouse feels itchy after seeing another mouse scratch. The discovery may help scientists understand the neural circuits that control socially contagious behaviors.

Igloo

'Doomsday' library joins seed vault in Arctic Svalbard, Norway

© Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix/Zuma
The Svalbard Global Seed Vault, located underground on a remote island in the Arctic Circle, is the world's largest security storage for seeds.
The so-called doomsday seed vault located underground on a remote island in the Arctic Ocean has gained a neighbor, and the new vault, opened March 27, will act as a digital archive for the world's data.

The underground Svalbard Global Seed Vault was built in 2008, about 620 miles (1,000 kilometers) from the North Pole. The frozen-storage facility houses the world's most important crop seeds, acting as a backup for gene banks around the world and protecting the valuable genetic material from natural disasters, equipment malfunctions, war and other problems, according to Cary Fowler, a scientist, conservationist and biodiversity advocate who first envisioned the vault . Thus, the moniker "doomsday vault."

This new vault shares the same mountain as the Global Seed Vault in Svalbard, and will do for the world's digital heritage what the Global Seed Vault has done for plants, according to Piql, the Norwegian tech company leading the new vault project.

Comment: Read more about the "Doomsday Seed Vault" - Bill Gates, Rockefeller and the GMO giants know something we don't?


Meteor

Flecks of Extraterrestrial dust, all over the Roof

© Jan Braly Hihle/Jon Larsen
Varieties of space dust, barely width of human air
After decades of failures and misunderstandings, scientists have solved a cosmic riddle — what occurs to the tons of dust particles that hit the Earth each and every day but seldom if ever get found in the locations that humans know very best, like buildings and parking lots, sidewalks and park benches.

The answer? Absolutely nothing. Appear harder. The tiny flecks are everywhere.

An international group identified that rooftops and other cityscapes readily gather the extraterrestrial dust in techniques that can ease its identification, contrary to science authorities who long pooh-poohed the concept as little far more than an urban myth kept alive by amateur astronomers.

Galaxy

Mysterious X-ray flash baffles astronomers

© NASA/Pontifical Catholic University
A mysterious flash of X-rays detected by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. This source likely comes from some sort of destructive event, but may be of a variety that scientists have never seen before.
It was a spark in the night. A flash of X-rays from a galaxy hovering nearly invisibly on the edge of infinity.

Astronomers say they do not know what caused it.

The orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory, was in the midst of a 75-day survey of a patch of sky known as the Chandra Deep Field-South, when it recorded the burst from a formerly quiescent spot in the cosmos.

For a few brief hours on Oct 1, 2014, the X-rays were a thousand times brighter than all the light from its home galaxy, a dwarf unremarkable speck almost 11 billion light years from here, in the constellation Fornax. Then whatever had gone bump in the night was over and the X-rays died.

The event as observed does not fit any known phenomena, according to Franz Bauer, an astronomer at Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, and lead author of a report to be published in Science.

Nebula

From a galaxy far, far away... a mysterious flash

© NASA/Pontifical Catholic University
A mysterious flash of X-rays detected by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. This source likely comes from some sort of destructive event, but may be of a variety that scientists have never seen before.
It was a spark in the night. A flash of X-rays from a galaxy hovering nearly invisibly on the edge of infinity.

Astronomers say they do not know what caused it.

The orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory, was in the midst of a 75-day survey of a patch of sky known as the Chandra Deep Field-South, when it recorded the burst from a formerly quiescent spot in the cosmos.

For a few brief hours on Oct 1, 2014, the X-rays were a thousand times brighter than all the light from its home galaxy, a dwarf unremarkable speck almost 11 billion light years from here, in the constellation Fornax. Then whatever had gone bump in the night was over and the X-rays died.

The event as observed does not fit any known phenomena, according to Franz Bauer, an astronomer at Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, and lead author of a report to be published in Science.

Brain

Research suggests a new role for astrocytes: maintaining the circadian rhythm

© Image courtesy of University of Rochester Medical Center
Astrocyte cells
Astrocytes were once believed to have a single, simple role as structural support in the brain. However, new research suggests that they are important in setting your internal clock.

Our brain is made of many types of cells. Most people are familiar with neurons, which send and receive electrical impulses that form our thoughts and actions. Astrocytes, another type of brain cell, have been found in a recent study to be more important than previously thought, especially when it comes to timekeeping and the activity of our master clock.