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SOTT Earth Changes Summary - August 2023: Extreme Weather, Planetary Upheaval, Meteor Fireballs

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So-called historic wildfires in the U.S., Greece, and Canada filled corporate media headlines while blaming "global boiling." However, the annual number of wildfires for 2023 remains average. In Greece, the annual average did increase moderately, and arsonists were to blame. Social media was flooded with convincing points and speculations, blaming the globalist psychos' minions for starting the fires in order to spread fears of man-made climate change to push Net Zero policies throughout the Western world, and also, to take advantage of the aftermath to buy land at a fraction of their original price.

Accusations of land-grabbing grew even louder after the Lahaina fires when private companies "generously" offered to buy the affected land. But then, Governor Josh Green, said he would not allow the land to end up in private hands, but that the government could buy them. Is this good news for the people of Lahaina? Or will the land, once handed over to the government, end up in the hands of private companies anyway? That remains to be seen.

But whether it was natural, man-made, or both, the official death toll from the fires is 115. Considering the population of Lahaina, that's a huge death toll. In addition, Maui's major reported that 850 people were still reported missing, and suddenly the number went down to 60.

There are many things to blame for this tragedy:

- Government incompetence.
- Laughable budget for wildfire safety.
- Exceptionally flammable grass was introduced in 2020.
- Extreme winds.
- No warning sirens.
- State officials refused to release water.
- High voltage cables cut and laid over dry grass.
- Police blockades that kept people from fleeing the deadly fires.
- Utility trucks blocked roads as people tried to flee.

Later, the government erected a fence around the affected areas, and fire survivors were not allowed to return to what was left of their homes and businesses. For "their protection", they said. Or is there something else they want to hide?

In early August, the warm-mongers were still pushing the "world is boiling" nonsense, while the US had a cooler-than-average summer, and northern Italy, the Dolomites, and the Pyrenees were hit with summer snow!

Then they change the narrative a bit and blame global warming for the extreme flooding around the world, yet, as we have shared before, it's all part of natural cycles, pointing out a shift to colder global temperatures.

And again it has nothing to do with CO2:
Recent research suggests carbon dioxide molecules have little consequential impact on outgoing radiation, and that today's climate models assign fundamentally erroneous global temperature effects to CO2.
But that doesn't matter because the goal of the globalist psychos and their minions - the corporate media and paid "experts" - is to fuel the fires of fear and hysteria. However, it seems that fewer and fewer people are buying into their lies, as reality sometimes reveals itself quite dramatically.


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SOTT Earth Changes Summary - July 2023: Extreme Weather, Planetary Upheaval, Meteor Fireballs

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Despite hysterical disinformation from the mainstream media, average July temperatures around the world were in line with previous years and were actually lower in some countries in the northern hemisphere.

It's worth noting that global warming alarmists blame hot temperatures for the raging wildfires around the world, but even if there has been a slight increase, some have been reported as arson (almost all of them in Greece for example), and others could have been caused by the increase in thunderstorms and isolated lightning strikes. In lesser cases, meteorites and overhead explosions can cause forest fires, in addition to outgassing.

Increased accumulation of conductive dust (volcanoes, comets, etc.) or rain promotes electrical discharges between higher layers of the atmosphere and the ground, which can manifest as lightning, intense tornadoes, waterspouts, more severe storms, or hurricanes. Something we can see quite clearly this month.

Here are some of the most remarkable precipitation and flooding events around the world for July 2023:
  • Bacolod and Manila, Philippines - 3 floods in 11 days triggered by Super Typhoon Doksuri.
  • Beijing, China - Heaviest rainfall in 140 years triggered by Super Typhoon Doksuri.
  • Sichuan Province, China - 11.8 inches of rain in 14 hours - 40,000 evacuated.
  • Sochi, Russia - 2 months of rain in 24 hours.
  • Milan - Italy - 2 weeks of rain in just 3 hours.
  • Netherlands and Germany - Storm Poly became the strongest summer storm on record.
  • Southwest Japan - Biggest rainfall on record - 16 inches of rain in 24 hours.
  • Lahore, Pakistan - Biggest rainfall in 30 years - 11.4 inches of rain in 10 hours
  • Kentucky - 11.2 inches of rain in 24 hours - Historic rainfall.
  • Vermont - 9 inches of rain in 24 hours - Historic flooding.
  • New York - 7 inches of summer rain in 24 hours - Severe flooding.
  • Chicago - 6 inches of rainfall - Historic summer flooding.
  • Valencia and Castellon, Spain - Hailstorm destroys more than 20,000 hectares of crops.
In recent years, a larger percentage of precipitation has come in the form of intense single-day events. Nine of the top 10 years for extreme one-day precipitation events have occurred since 1996
And some unseasonable snow events:
  • Europe's Dolomites and Alps - Rare summer snow.
  • Skardu, Pakistan - Unexpected summer snowfall breaks 18-year record.
  • Himachal Pradesh, India - 4 feet of summer snow.
  • Sierra Nevada - California - Snowpack at a staggering 1,000% of normal
It should be noted that increased precipitation along with colder-than-usual temperatures is the perfect mix for an intense winter. The Farmers' Almanac is already forecasting it:
With El Niño conditions brewing for later in 2023, cold temperatures will bring ice, sleet, and snow in January and February to those living on the I-95 corridor, between Washington D.C. and Boston.
Again, are we witnessing the first stages of an ice age?
The Sun has entered into the modern Grand Solar Minimum (2020-2053) that will lead to a significant reduction of solar magnetic field and activity like during Maunder minimum leading to noticeable reduction of terrestrial temperature. - Zharkova, 2020
Time will tell. Just remember that natural climate changes are not linear and periods of calm can be followed by sudden and rapid changes. Look for the signs and prepare accordingly.


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SOTT Earth Changes Summary - June 2023: Extreme Weather, Planetary Upheaval, Meteor Fireballs

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Record rainfall and flooding around the world marked this month, but some rare snow events should be highlighted:

Some parts of Jasper, Alberta, received more than 4 inches of rain and more than 20 inches of snow during the week of the summer solstice. In Jasper National Park, two roads were closed and 60 visitors were rescued after becoming stranded. In western Canada, many ski resorts were blanketed with unusually heavy snow for June.

The same system dropped 6 inches of snow at Tamarack Resort, Idaho, and Beaver Creek Resort, Colorado. America's Mountain was also hit by a sudden blizzard that dumped a record amount of snow for June, bringing all traffic in the area to a halt as visibility dropped to zero in a matter of minutes.

In Santa Cruz, Bolivia, the country's largest agricultural region braced for a surprise wave of snow and ice that caused lasting damage to crops and livestock. Torrential rains also caused flooding in the same area, leading to road closures and air evacuations.

Other important flood events this month:
  • Southern Brazil: Record flooding for June - 13 deaths, 5,000 homes damaged, and 84,000 people without power.
  • Japan: Tropical Storm Mawar unleashed the heaviest 24-hour rainfall on record - thousands evacuated and 4,000 homes without power.
  • Southwest China: 24.2 inches of rain in 24 hours broke a national record for the area - Thousands evacuated.
  • Haiti - Torrential rains and heavy flooding caused 42 deaths - Tens of thousands of homes lost.
  • Eastern Nepal: Hundreds of thousands affected by flash floods - 13 dead, 26 missing.
  • Southern Cuba: 14 inches of rain in 24 hours - Thousands evacuated.
Another interesting event worth mentioning was the rare and powerful 5.8 magnitude earthquake that struck several parts of western France on June 17. The earthquake was described as one of the strongest ever recorded on the mainland.

All this, and more, in this month's SOTT Earth Changes Summary:


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SOTT Earth Changes Summary - May 2023: Extreme Weather, Planetary Upheaval, Meteor Fireballs

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** Sorry the Earth Changes Summary Video for May is so late - all Sott.net chroniclers were attending a wedding! **

If you thought the unseasonable snow and cold temperatures would end in April, you were wrong. Records continued to be broken in May in both hemispheres, and many countries suffered from heavy floods due to tons of melting snow.

Some snowy events to highlight:
  • Michigan - 26 inches of record snow.
  • West Virginia - 20 inches of record snow.
  • Sierra Nevada, California - 15 inches in 48 hours. (State snowpack over 300% of average)
  • Teller County, Colorado - Heavy unseasonable snow.
  • Spain - Unseasonable snow after an early heatwave.
  • Iwate Prefecture, Japan - Record snow for May.
  • New South Wales and Australian Capital Territory - Record coldest May temperatures.
And flooding events:
  • Alaska - Catastrophic flooding after ice jams and melting snow
  • Emilia Romagna, Italy - Heavy floods take the life of 14.
  • Southwestern Germany - Heavy floods cause closure of rail lines.
  • Lapland, Finland - Worst flooding in 55 years
  • Yemen - Heavy floods leave 24 dead
  • Somalia - Devastating floods trigger the evacuation of 200,000
  • South Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo - Catastrophic floods leave 400 dead.
  • Jiangxi, China - 14,000 evacuated after heavy floods
Remember, don't listen to the warm-mongers when we start getting hotter than normal temperatures, it's all caused by El Niño. And don't forget to look up and pay attention to the show provided by the increasing number of meteor fireballs... and don't let any "authority" convince you that they are Martian spacecrafts crashing into Earth!

All that, and more, in this month's SOTT Earth Changes Summary:


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SOTT Earth Changes Summary - April 2023: Extreme Weather, Planetary Upheaval, Meteor Fireballs

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The warm-mongers blame the residual activity of La Niña for the record cold and snow in April in some parts of the northern hemisphere. But as much as they would like to blame la Niña, there has been an ENSO-neutral state for some time now.

In addition, there is data suggesting a 60% chance of a transition to El Niño in May-July 2023, and that it could trigger a new spike in global temperatures. So, if things get warmer in some parts of the world and the media and "climate authorities" blame it on global warming, pay no attention to them. It's El Niño.

We would like to remind our readers that the global climate is primarily controlled by solar activity, not by human activity or man-made C02. The same applies, of course, to phenomena such as El Niño and La Niña:
It is not out of the question that there are physical links between energetic solar eruptions and El Niños. Whether these lines of reasoning turn out correct or spurious is of no import regarding the practical results of this investigation. They leave little doubt that solar activity and ENSO events are closely connected to such a degree that long-range forecasts beyond the 12-month lead time are now possible. The consequences of these results for the hypothesis of anthropogenic climate change are far-reaching. As stated in the beginning, ENSO events are the strongest source of variability in the global climate system and explain most of the global temperature anomalies. Our result that solar activity regulates these powerful climate phenomena shows clearly that the impact of the sun's variability has been underestimated in a way that reverses the proportions. Recent research published by H. Svensmark and N. Calder corroborate this statement. Actually, solar activity turns out to be the dominant factor in climate change. IPCC scientists can no longer uphold their contention that "solar variability over the next 50 years will not induce a prolonged forcing significant in comparison with the effect of increasing carbon dioxide concentrations."
It is worth noting that we had 2 X-class solar flares on April 19 and April 20.

Now, the total temperature, measured from the surface to the higher layers of the atmosphere, continues to decrease in accordance with the solar minimum. Always remember that we cannot trust the official data as it has been largely manipulated:
"From February 2016 to February 2018, "global average temperatures dropped by 0.56 degrees Celsius." That, he notes, is the biggest two-year drop in the past century."
Doctored data, not real temperatures, set 'global warming' record: "In 2007, a blogger named Steve McIntyre asked NASA why they had taken raw temperature data and made past temperatures lower and recent temperatures higher. NASA was actually forced to admit they were lying and rename 1934 as the hottest year. They are doing this globally as well."
There was the study published in the American Meteorological Society's Journal of Climate showing that climate models exaggerate global warming from CO2 emissions by as much as 45%. It was ignored.
A study in the journal Nature Geoscience found that climate models were faulty, and that, as one of the authors put it, "We haven't seen that rapid acceleration in warming after 2000 that we see in the models."
Findings from the University of Alabama-Huntsville showed that the Earth's atmosphere appears to be less sensitive to changing CO2 levels than previously assumed.
And how about the fact that polar bears populations are increasing?

All this data manipulation makes sense, as they need to justify the push for nonsensical Net-Zero and green policies that would fuel fear profiteering and means of control like 15-minute cities and climate lockdowns. Or at least that's their agenda, but it's looking more and more like they're shooting themselves in the foot; just ask Germany, which has no efficient nuclear power plants and has to rely on coal plants and expensive imported electricity from France.

Without further ado, here are the record snow events for April in the US:
  • Snowbird Resort, and Solitude Mountain Resort, Utah: All-time record - 809 inches of snow.
  • Casper, Wyoming: 40-year snowfall record - 26 inches of snow.
  • Wisconsin: 22 inches of snow.
  • Central Colorado: 6 inches of snow after weeks of unusually low temperatures.
Around the world:
  • The Alps: 40 inches of snow in 5 days.
  • South-west China: All-time record for April with 9 inches of snow.
  • Balkans - 15.7 inches and record-breaking low temperatures for April.
  • Romania - Unseasonable snow and low temperatures with wind gusts of 75 to 85 km/h.
  • Reykjavík, Iceland: Rare "spring snowfall".
  • Taif, and Al Baha, Saudi Arabia - Unseasonable snow.
All this and more in our SOTT Earth Changes Summary for April 2023:


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SOTT Earth Changes Summary - March 2023: Extreme Weather, Planetary Upheaval, Meteor Fireballs

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Extreme weather continues to batter California. Heavy rains, flooding, hurricane-force winds, and tornadoes left hundreds of thousands without power and prompted evacuations from the hardest-hit areas. To top it off, the state reported the second snowiest late winter on record and the third snowiest month on record. The anomalously heavy snow buried Southern California mountain communities under 12.5 feet of snow and caused the indefinite closure of Yosemite National Park, which received 15 feet of snow and broke a decades-old snowfall record in the process.

Utah also recorded its snowiest late winter, breaking a record set in 1983. Snowbasin Resort in Weber County officially had its snowiest month on record.

And the same system that affected parts of the West Coast also hit southern states with snow, flooding, golf-ball-sized hail, and tornadoes, leaving more than 1 million without power and killing at least 13. And the northeastern U.S. also got its share of extreme weather, as a nor'easter brought 3 feet of snow, rain, gusty winds, and coastal flooding.

Tropical Cyclone Freddy made a rare second landfall in southern Africa, killing at least 216 people. Malawi and Mozambique were the hardest hit, with 190 deaths, 19,000 displaced, and thousands without power.

In Brazil, heavy rains and the overflowing Acre River flooded large areas of the city of Rio Branco, Acre. The Acre River in Rio Branco rose from about 26 feet to 51 in 24 hours. Hundreds of homes were damaged and at least 2,000 people were evacuated.

Other major floods worldwide this month:
  • Johor, Malaysia - 4 dead and 40,000 displaced after heavy flooding
  • Java, Sumatra, and Sulawesi, Indonesia - 4 dead, 7 missing after floods and landslides
  • Somalia - At least 14 dead in flash floods
  • Kenya - 7 dead and 25 families left homeless after flash floods
  • Şanlıurfa and Adıyaman, Turkey - Flash floods leave 14 dead
  • Bolivia - Thousands affected by severe flooding
  • Cauca, Colombia - 1,500 families affected by floods and landslides
  • Northern Australia - Hundreds evacuated after rivers overflow
An estimated 461 people were injured and 13 people died after a magnitude 6.8 earthquake struck southern Ecuador. Many buildings in Cuenca, one of the country's largest cities, reported structural damage.

Another magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck much of Pakistan and Afghanistan. At least 13 people were reported dead and twelve injured.

Finally, after the strongest solar storm in over five years, massive auroras were seen over Tasmania, Australia, and New Zealand, and Northern Lights were reported as far south as North Carolina and Phoenix, Arizona, almost to the Mexican border.

All this and more in our SOTT Earth Changes Summary for March 2023:


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SOTT Earth Changes Summary - February 2023: Extreme Weather, Planetary Upheaval, Meteor Fireballs

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A devastating 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck southern Turkey and northern Syria on the morning of February 6. A second major earthquake of 7.5 magnitude struck the region 9 hours later, causing further severe damage and destruction of buildings. On February 20, a 6.4 magnitude earthquake struck Hatay, and on February 27, a 5.6 magnitude earthquake centered in Malatya also caused many damaged buildings to collapse and increased the death toll. More than 150 aftershocks were also recorded.

46,000 people in Turkey and 6,0000 in Syria lost their lives, and at least 1.5 million people are now homeless. More than 160,000 buildings have collapsed or been severely damaged. It's hard to know the true number so far, it could be much higher.

The immediate damage is estimated at $34 billion - or about 4% of the country's annual economic output. But the indirect costs of the quake could be much higher, and recovery will be neither easy nor quick.

Just for the record, a prediction model based on the geometry between celestial bodies related to seismic activity (SSGEOS) highlighted a potential major earthquake in central Turkey days before the event above:



This model is still developing, but it seems promising for predicting major earthquake events with reasonable accuracy.

A series of earthquakes also struck Tajikistan, with the largest measured at magnitude 6.8, according to the USGS. The quake was felt strongly across the border in some areas of Kashgar Prefecture and Kizilsu Kyrgyz Autonomous Prefecture in Xinjiang, but no casualties or damage were reported.

A massive late-winter storm moved across the US, dumping record snow, freezing temperatures, and heavy flooding, canceling hundreds of flights, and coating major roads with ice. However, the same system brought record warmth to the South.

Other related significant events in the U.S. this month:
  • Tooele, Utah - 2 feet of snow overnight.
  • Michigan - Snow and ice storm leaves 461,000 without power.
  • Cheyenne, Wyoming - 4 feet of snow and record cold of -19C.
  • Southern California - 6 feet of snow.
And around the world:
  • Iranian Kuhrang, Iran - Record 8.2 feet of snow in 48 hours.
  • Morocco - Record 7.2 feet of snow left 87 villages isolated.
  • Austria - 1.2 feet of snow in 24 hours.
  • Balkans - Heavy snowfall cuts power to thousands.
  • Mayorce, Spain - 20 inches of snow and a sudden drop in temperature.
All this and more in our SOTT Earth Changes Summary for February 2023:


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SOTT Earth Changes Summary - January 2023: Extreme Weather, Planetary Upheaval, Meteor Fireballs

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The start of 2023 has been marked by heavy snow, unseasonably cold temperatures, and wetter-than-expected weather for the season. All this while the manufactured food and energy crisis continues to deepen in the West, thanks to the deluded globalist psychopaths.

Extreme weather hit California pretty hard this month: A bomb cyclone, severe flooding, mudslides, power outages, walls of snow in Soda Spring, and a magnitude 4.2 earthquake with an epicenter in offshore Malibu.

Denver, Colorado, saw 13 inches of snow this month, making it the 15th snowiest January on record. Jackson County registered -5°C, and the Purgatory ski resort recorded 23 inches of snow in 24 hours.

Northern Arizona got more than two feet of snow in 48 hours. It was the 25th largest snow event and broke the single-day snowfall record on Sunday.

Nevada was hit by winter storms that brought heavy rain, high winds, and significant snowfall at higher elevations. Las Vegas desert was also covered in white, a strange sight for the area.

More than 41 inches of snow fell at Sundance Mountain Resort in Utah, forcing a closure due to extreme weather conditions. The resort also recorded nearly 8 inches of rain.

Heavy snow also disrupted normal life in Italy, Austria, Slovenia, Croatia, and Mallorca. Mallorca was covered by its largest snowfall in more than five years.

China's northernmost city, Mohe, was hit by an all-time record of -53°C, the lowest ever recorded. The local officials worked overtime to ensure heating and water services. This comes days after temperatures plunged to -50°C in Russia's Yakutsk.

Central Asia also suffered a harsh January. In Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, and Turkmenistan recorded unusual levels of snow, that collapsed power poles and trees, blocked main roads, and burst water pipes. The temperatures in Kazakhstan reached a chilling -30°C.

The Middle East was also caught off guard by colder-than-usual temperatures and snow. Tens of thousands of Iranians were left without gas amid snow and freezing conditions, and Afghanistan temperatures plummeted as low as -33°C, combined with widespread snowfall, freezing gusts, and regular power outages. At least 166 people died due to the cold wave.

Ex-Tropical Cyclone Ellie continued to batter northern Australia this month. Heavy rain turned roads into rivers, thousands of cattle got lost or died, and boats were the only form of transportation in some counties. Western Australia was also hit hard by heavy rain and floods. 38 homes and 37 businesses were destroyed, with an additional 121 homes damaged. In some cases, the damage is so severe that will require long-term rebuilding efforts. The floods have also caused significant damage to infrastructure and transportation routes.

New Zealand's largest city declared a state of emergency after torrential rains caused widespread flooding and evacuations. Heavy floods washed away houses, blocked roads, and knocked out power. The city received 75% of its usual summer rainfall in just 15 hours.

Latvia experienced its worst flooding since 1981, forcing residents of central areas to evacuate their homes. Meanwhile, large chunks of ice that drifted from Belkarus caused the water level to rise, while also putting pressure on a new dam.

Other noteworthy events this month:
  • Sumatra, Indonesia: Heavy flooding leaves 3 dead and 15,000 homes damaged
  • Johor and Pahang, Malaysia: More than 4,000 were displaced by flooding caused by 17 inches of rain in 24 hours
  • North Sulawesi, Indonesia: Nearly 18 inches of rain in 48 hours left 3-meter floods in some areas.
  • Zambia - Non-stop rains caused catastrophic flooding in southern and central provinces.
And things start to get rocky! A 5.9 Mag earthquake struck northwestern Iran, killing at least seven people and injuring 440.

All this and more in our SOTT Earth Changes Summary for January 2023:


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SOTT Earth Changes Summary - December 2022: Extreme Weather, Planetary Upheaval, Meteor Fireballs

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This past month of December, a couple of serious blasts of Arctic air spread across the continental U.S., Canada, and parts of Europe and Asia, shattering records. More than 250 million were affected by the freezing temperatures... and winter had just started.

Forecasters believe that man-made climate change has empowered La Niña, triggering the so-called Greenland Block (A powerful area of high pressure in the Northeast Pacific and lower-than-normal air pressure over the western Pacific). They even propose this is the main factor for the record freezing temperatures in the northern hemisphere this winter. Yet, we know better now: The sun defines climate, and the global cold trend may increase over the coming years.

Warm-mongers also highlighted that sea ice in Antarctica reached its lowest extent on record at the end of December. Yet, in the long-term Antarctic sea ice still shows an increasing trend. In addition, the overall snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the second-highest in the past 17 years.

Arctic and antarctic ice and snow increase and decrease in yearly cycles connected to larger cycles of solar activity. As the solar-minimum sets in, we can expect an overall increase in ice and snow cover.

The arctic blasts engulfed the US, coast-to-coast and top-to-bottom. 60% of the US was affected by freezing temperatures, and 2 million were left without power. The pattern flipped to warmer temperatures at the end of the month, just to welcome another forecasted polar vortex in January.

Most of Canada, from British Columbia to Newfoundland, was also hit by extreme cold. Airports canceled thousands of flights, and power outages affected more than 300,000 just in Quebec and Ontario.

The UK was pummeled by the 'snowiest period in 12 years' lasting a month. The government outlined plans to go 'lights out' in January after National Grid warned there could be blackouts due to an expected energy crisis.

It was also a time of extremes in France and parts of Switzerland with significant snow at higher altitudes, and heavy rain lower down. Even if there was a warmer trend in some parts of Europe this month, the forecasts point out to a colder January.

Parts of Moscow were covered by over 12 inches of snow this month, something not usually observed until the end of winter. The last time a similar depth of snow was recorded in Moscow in mid-December was in 1989 and 1993.

And Mexico City also got its third snowfall in 82 years, affecting primarily high-altitude areas.

Floods triggered by sheets of rain continued around the world this month, including:
  • Philippines - Heavy rain caused 51 deads and the displacement of at least 46,000. 17,300 acres of crops were wiped out.
  • Southern Thailand - 21 inches of rain in 24 hours.
  • Northcentral Vietnam - 13 inches of rain in 24 hours.
  • Namibia - 3 months' worth of rain in 24 hours.
  • South Africa - Countrywide floods.
  • Baghdad, Iraq - Non-stop rain for 45 days.
And at least two died and 11 were injured after a strong 6.4-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of northern California. Thousands were left without power. 80 aftershocks have rattled parts of Northern California since the event. The largest aftershock was a 4.6 magnitude quake in Rio Dell, one of the hardest hit areas.


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SOTT Earth Changes Summary - November 2022: Extreme Weather, Planetary Upheaval, Meteor Fireballs

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This month was marked by early snowfalls in the Northern Hemisphere and late ones in the Southern Hemisphere, along with 2 possible meteorite impacts, and unusually strong floods.

According to NOAA, snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the second-highest for November in the past 17 years, extending from Minnesota to Siberia. Extensive snow cover early in the cold season is not a good sign, as air masses can deepen in later months. So far, the trend points to a persistent cold and harsh winter.
Northern hemisphere snow cover.
© National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Northern hemisphere snow cover.
Northern hemisphere snow cover.
© National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Northern hemisphere snow cover.
Bad news for the US and the EU as they are unprepared for a harsh winter, thanks to the ruling pathocrats' (and similar crazies) beyond stupid, society-damaging economic decisions of late. This, of course, is part of a larger "strategy" to impose a global totalitarian regime. And nature, of course, responds to the widespread suffering caused by it.

The northern part of the US is already experiencing a fast drop in temperature, and significant snowfalls disrupted traffic and power. Minnesota, and Western New York, were the most affected this month.

Inner Mongolia and northern parts of China also got blanketed in early snow this month, along with a mix of unusually consistent precipitation.

An unseasonable cold snap across southeastern Australia caused record snowfalls in several states in early summer.

And after an extremely wet October, southeast Australia continued to see heavy rainfall and floods in November. New South Wales and Victoria got the worst of the floods, with towns isolated and hundreds displaced. Local farmers continue suffering significant losses.

Heavy flooding continued to wreak havoc around the world this month. Some events to highlight:
  • Eastern DR Congo and Rwanda - Record-breaking floods triggering landslides and claiming at least 40 lives
  • Florida's East Coast - Hurricane Nicole claimed 5 lives and left 300,000 without power
  • Jeddah, Saudi Arabia - 7 inches of rain in just 6 hours
  • Dominican Republic - Widespread Power outages in Santo Domingo
  • Spain - Record-breaking storm shuts down airport in Valencia and left thousands without power.
And some notable earthquakes worth mentioning:
  • Shallow magnitude 5.6 earthquake in Java, Indonesia - 310 dead and widespread building damage.
  • Magnitude 5.6 earthquake hit Western Nepal - At least six people died.
  • Shallow magnitude 6.2 earthquake near the coast of Chile.
  • Rare 5.3 magnitude earthquake hit West Texas.
And last but not least: Several people across Northern California captured on video a meteor fireball that made headlines after claims that it destroyed a home in Nevada County.

The homeowner, Dustin Procita, and his neighbors told arriving firefighters that they had heard a thunderous crash at about the same time as the blaze had begun.

In Canada, video and witnesses saw, heard, and felt the impact of a 3 feet meteorite. The impact should have been around Brantford, Ontario. Astronomers said locals may find remnants in the area.
Astronomers spotted the asteroid just hours before it struck Earth on November 19, near Lake Erie in Canada. This is not the first time this year astronomers have discovered a rock from space just hours before it hit Earth. But this time, it entered Earth's atmosphere over a populated area.
So, grab a coat, look up and pay attention!