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Sat, 11 Jul 2020
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Extreme Temperatures


Snowflake

New record for snow in Norway: 10 meters (over 32 feet) remains in summer

snow norway
Never seen so much snow in July," reads the headline on the Norwegian website nrk/no.

We have not had such snowfall as this year, says Knut Kinne, watercourse technical manager at the energy company BKK.

With ten meters (more than 32 feet) of packed snow, it may not have melted in the summer and fall if we had not removed it, says communications adviser Jarle Hodne at BKK.

Snowflake

The Andes - "Experts say it has never snowed that much" - Over 13 FEET deep

snow

Las Leñas, Argentina
The Andes continue accumulating snow, up to 4 meters (more than 13 feet).

Unfortunately for skiers, time does not understand pandemics. The Andes are receiving perhaps record-breaking snowfall just when ski centers are closed due to Covid-19. There are few clues as to whether they will finally be able to open. (I say 'perhaps record-breaking' because my translator said it was 'anthological' snowfall. I'm not sure what that means.)

Nonetheless, Cerro Catedral Alta Patagonia has detected groups of people who skipped the ban and went skiing anyway.


SOTT Logo Media

SOTT Earth Changes Summary - June 2020: Extreme Weather, Planetary Upheaval, Meteor Fireballs

secsjune2020
Sheets of rain, floods and hail left a path of destruction all over the world, and the northern hemisphere still got snow in June.

The unbelievable amount of precipitation during the past months can be explained with the increasing amount of charged particles in upper layers of the atmosphere.

When meteors and meteorites pass through our lower atmosphere, or when our planet goes trough a comet dust stream, charged particles accumulate between the ionosphere and the surface of the earth causing storms to intensify, clouds to grow and more rain to fall. Wildfires and volcanic eruptions, for example, also contribute to this accumulation of particles.

At the same time, rain can conduct the accumulated electrical charge of the ionosphere to the ground, which increases the occurrence of other electrical phenomena, as tornadoes, hurricanes and plasma formations.

The accumulation of charged aerosols and increasingly colder temperatures in upper layers of the atmosphere - caused by the current solar minimum - can also be responsible of the increasing amount of hail and unseasonable snow around the world.

Charged particles influence weather much more than has been appreciated.

Heavy rain and raging floods took the life of hundreds and affected millions in south China, and destroyed 1,470 houses and 3 bridges in Gorontalo Province, Indonesia. Heavy floods also hit Assam, India leaving 16 dead and over 253,000 affected.

While Romania got its second coldest day in June, Montana got more than 1 foot of snow and southeast Wyoming got 6 inches... just at the beginning of summer.

Siberia got a share of extreme weather this month, from tornadoes to floods and extreme temperature swings.

A 7.5-magnitude earthquake rattled large swaths of southern and central Mexico, killing at least five people. No major damage was reported.

Locusts continued to ravage Africa, India, Brazil, Argentina and the Middle East, with no sign that they'll be gone soon.

All that and more in our SOTT Earth Changes Summary for June 2020:


Snowflake

Temperature extremes: Pole of Cold district that recently recorded desert-like heat of +38C now sees snow in Verkhoyansk, Russia

As the pictures show, Verkhoyansk was hit by summer snow, which is not unknown but hardly common.

As the pictures show, Verkhoyansk was hit by summer snow, which is not unknown but hardly common.
Topsy-turvy summer swings from Saudi-heat to freezer in Arctic north of Russia's largest region of Yakutia.

Abnormally cold weather has been recorded in the north of Yakutia with residents of Verkhoyansk district waking up to fresh snow on 5 July.

Just days before that, locals were complaining about the hot and dry beginning of July, with air temperature heating up to +27C on 1 July, and wildfires raging.


Earlier, on 17 June this district saw a world record for the Arctic of 38C.

Snowflake

Summer suddenly turned chilly in southern Norway - FOOT of snow with -7.2C temperatures

snow Norway
After an unusually warm June, Norway's July summer holidays got off to an extremely chilly start over the weekend. Strong winds, heavy rain, hail and even some snow caught many tourists by surprise.

Slippery roads and as much as 30 centimeters of snow in the mountains prompted warnings from state highway officials that motorists shouldn't drive over mountain passes without snow tires on their vehicles. One mountain lodge, Sognefjellshytta, reported a new record low temperature for July of minus-7.2C late Saturday night, and so did several other weather stations in the mountains of Southern Norway.


Comment: Also recently: Big July snowstorm at ski resort in southern Norway - at least 14 inches dumped


Ice Cube

Sea ice extent in Antarctica greater now than in 1980

Antarctica

Antarctica
Also larger concentration of sea ice than in 1980.

Larger concentration of sea ice in Antarctica in Jun 2020 than Jun 1980

Larger concentration of sea ice in Antarctica in Jun 2020 than Jun 1980
Sea ice extent now is 700,000 sq km (270,272 sq miles) greater than in 1980.

In case you're having a hard time reading the numbers, here they are:

Snowflake Cold

Temperatures drop below freezing in Queensland as snow blankets parts of Australia

A kangaroo (pictured) shivered through  freezing conditions in Wadbiliga National Park near Nimmitabel in the NSW region of Monaro on Saturday
© EPA
A kangaroo (pictured) shivered through freezing conditions in Wadbiliga National Park near Nimmitabel in the NSW region of Monaro on Saturday
Parts of Australia have shivered through their coldest night of the year so far as temperatures plummeted below 0C.

It was a chilly start to the working week, with most capital cities across the nation still in the single digit temperatures at 8am on Monday.

South-east Queensland shivered through a second consecutive morning of freezing temperatures after 30 towns across the region recorded their coldest temperatures of the year on Sunday.

Residents in the state's Southern Downs region felt the the biggest brunt of the winter chill on Monday, where Applethorpe woke up to a frosty -2.1C while Warwick recorded -1.1C.

Wellcamp Airport recorded -1.4C at 5.20am, while further north the mercury dropped to 0.5C in Kingaroy.

Brisbane airport dropped to a low of 7C, while the CBD was slightly warmer at 8.1C, two degrees lower than average.

Snowflake

Big July snowstorm at ski resort in southern Norway - at least 14 inches dumped

snow

Summer snow in southern Norway
The Fonna (Folgefonn) Glacier in Norway was closed today due to a big snowstorm that deposited at least 35cm (14 inches) of fresh snow on the area (pictured above this morning).

The road up to the glacier was closed due to the snow.

Fonna is one of three glacier areas currently open to skiers in Norway and one of 11 in Europe.

It opened for the season about two months ago after teams took around two months to dig out exceptionally deep snow burying the road to it.

Snowflake

Snowy start to July in Banff National Park, Canada

Snowy conditions observed in Banff National Park on July 2, 2020.
© Sunshine Village Ski Resort
Snowy conditions observed in Banff National Park on July 2, 2020.
It's not common, but it does happen, and it coincided with a few days of markedly cooler-than-normal temperatures in Western Canada.

Though we normally expect summer-like warmth in Canada by July 1st -- and indeed, parts of Central Canada were cooking in temperatures at or above the 30-degree mark -- an unwelcome cooldown is never completely out of the question provided the right ingredients are there.

In the case of this year, much of Western Canada found itself beneath an upper-level low that brought some unstable conditions and noticeably cooler temperatures.

Info

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Arctic heat as world civilization resets

Arctic
Arctic reached 100F last week of June 2020, but 99.1F in 1988, so many climate anomalies as this Grand Solar Minimum intensifies so we need to look back at 1177 B.C to find a deep cooling that ended that civilization.


Sources