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Sun, 25 Aug 2019
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Extreme Temperatures

Snowflake

Up to 20 inches of snow dumped on ski slopes in New Zealand

Strong winds and snow drifts forced Mt Dobson skifield to close its access road on Thursday.

Strong winds and snow drifts forced Mt Dobson skifield to close its access road on Thursday.
It was a "frustrating" morning for Mt Dobson ski field on Thursday after the excitement of 40 centimetres of snow in 36 hours was dampened by strong winds and snow drifts forced the closure of its access road.

"I felt so bad because we did that Facebook post yesterday [saying the snow had arrived] and so many people were sending messages saying 'I'm invoking my powder clause and taking the day off work'," sales and marketing manager Mike Smith said.

"It's defeated us today but that's just life in the mountains unfortunately."


Snowflake Cold

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Unusual global cold - Is anybody noticing?

Minnesota record cold
© YouTube/Adapt 2030 (screen capture)

With global media focused on a wildfires that occur in Siberia every year, few are putting together the second year in a row for temperature extremes from Spain to the UK or all time record cold & snow anomalies sprinkled across the N. Hemisphere during summer. Its not about the heat or cold so much but how global crops will respond to the changes.

Climate Revolution is a 'Must Read' for understanding our Sun driven climate as we progress deeper into the new Eddy Grand Solar Minimum. Weather extremes leading to Global food scarcity and high food prices are here now, and this book describes the expected changes, how to survive & thrive during future challenging times with practical preparations.


Comment: The mainstream media has focused almost exclusively on record-breaking hot temperatures this summer....promoting the man-made global warming/climate change narrative...yet it ought to be noted that at the other extreme, many new cold temperature records are also being set across the planet at this time:


Attention

Temperatures dip to 37 degrees in Minnesota, breaking 121-year-old record

NOAA temp outlook
© NOAA
While the calendar says Minnesota is in the middle of summer, it felt like fall in northern Minnesota on Tuesday morning.

A new daily low temperature record was set in International Falls, where the mercury dipped to 37 degrees, breaking the record (38 degrees) set back in 1898.

Typically, low temperatures in International Fall, which sits along the Minnesota-Canada border, hover around the mid-50s this time of year.

Temperatures in the area don't typically reach the 30s until late September, early October.


Comment: The record-breaking temperatures, lows and highs, being recorded around the globe these days are likely influenced by a rapidly changing jet stream. See also:

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Record jet stream as Earth's atmosphere shifts to Grand Solar Minimum pattern


Snowflake Cold

Austin, Texas just recorded its coldest ever July temperature

Texas flag
It's been confirmed, last week's historically deep mid-Summer cold front brought the mercury crashing to it's lowest ever levels in Austin, Texas in the month of July.

With a low of 14.4C (58F) on Thursday, July 25, the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport thermometer smashed its previous all-time monthly low of 15.6C (60F) set in 2013, making it Austin's coldest July temperature on record in books dating back to World War II.

The July 25th daily record low of 67F (from 2000) was also broken (obviously), shattered in fact.

Info

Met Office confirms new UK record temperature of 38.7C

People enjoying the River Cam in Cambridge last Thursday, now the hottest UK day on record
© Leon Neal/Getty Images
People enjoying the River Cam in Cambridge last Thursday, now the hottest UK day on record.

Britain joins Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands in breaking national records


The record for the highest temperature officially recorded in the UK was set last Thursday as a heatwave gripped the country, the Met Office has confirmed.

A temperature of 38.7C was recorded at Cambridge Botanic Garden, exceeding the previous record of 38.5C set in Faversham, Kent, in August 2003.

The figure was first announced as a provisional temperature on Friday and has now been validated by the Met Office observations team.

It means the UK joins Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands in breaking national records as exceptionally high temperatures gripped large parts of central and western Europe last week.


The searing temperatures caused chaos on the UK's rail network.

Comment: Heatwave superstition: The extreme heat in Europe has nothing to do with CO2 levels


Snowflake

For the first time in 2 decades, thick snow lingers on Himalayan passes in July as more snowfall hits

record-breaking snow
Crazed environmentalists take note, the Himalayan mountain passes of Rohtang, Baralacha, Kunjum, Shikula are STILL blanketed in deep snow, in July!

Snow holding on until the end of July is incredibly rare on these passes, reports the The Statesman — in fact, it's the first time in 20 years that it's occurred, the packs are usually all-gone by the end of May.

Furthermore, heavy and record-breaking snow has been falling this week actually adding to the pack.

"The heavy accumulation of snow up to 4-5 feet on Rohtang, Baralacha, Kunjum, Shikula passes is certainly good for the environment in the Himalayas," said Senior Scientific Officer at State Centre on Climate Change, Dr SS Randhawa.


Info

Heatwave superstition: The extreme heat in Europe has nothing to do with CO2 levels

polar bear
In this video I show why people who try to link heatwaves and extreme weather to CO2 levels, are engaging in superstition (or worse) - not science.


Comment: History shows that the warmest US decade on record was the 1930s


Snowflake

Snow and hail in Yorkshire, UK...in July

Wintery showers in Summer at Tan Hill Inn
© Tan Hill Inn
Wintery showers in Summer at Tan Hill Inn
Snow has been reported as falling in Yorkshire - in the same week as the hottest July day ever recorded.

Regulars at the Tan Inn watched as the white stuff began falling in North Yorkshire. The snow and hail flurries were captured from the CCTV at the pub near Richmond.

This week, the UK basked in temperatures in the 30s, which caused major disruption to transport links.

(View video here)

Sun

Reindeer hit the beach as temperatures soar in northern Finland

Reindeer in Rovaniemi, Finland cool down at the beach
© Johanna Koivisto
Reindeer in Rovaniemi, Finland cool down at the beach.
Finnish reindeer in the Christmas destination Lapland were pictured lying on the beach in a shaded spot to seek respite from abnormally high temperatures.

The two reindeer were pictured seeking solace from the soaring 28C weather at Ounaskoski beach, in Rovaniemi, Tuesday. Fellow beach-goers snapped pictures of the unlikely visitors as they cooled off in the shade.

"Many people took photos and it didn't seem to bother them in the slightest. Children were playing nearby and that didn't disturb them either," Johanna Koivisto told a local news outlet after snapping a picture of the relaxed pair.

Last week, reindeer were pictured "queuing" outside a local social benefits office in the Lapland village of Inari as they sought shade.

Comment: The mainstream media has focused almost exclusively on record-breaking hot temperatures this summer....promoting the man-made global warming/climate change narrative...yet it ought to be noted that at the other extreme, many new cold temperature records are also being set across the planet at this time:


Info

Ancient apocalypses that changed the course of civilization

Volcano Hekla
© Abraham Ortelius/Wikimedia Commons
The eruption of the Icelandic volcano Hekla may have led to the collapse of multiple thriving Bronze Age societies.
Life, as they say, goes on. Until one day it doesn't. For ancient societies, without the means to predict natural disasters, destruction could often come suddenly and completely by surprise. Below are four of the most devastating natural events in recorded human history, and the societies that they wiped off the map.

The Storegga Slides

Until about 8,000 years ago, the British Isles were a peninsula, joined to mainland Europe by a strip of chalk downs, swamps, lakes and wooded hills. Today, we call this submerged world Doggerland.

Today, fishermen routinely bring up carved bone and antler tools from the Mesolithic hunter-gatherers who lived here. But by the end of the 7th millennium BC, a warming world caused sea levels to rise. The people of Doggerland must have watched with dread as their villages were swallowed up one by one. But one event would turn the slow advance of the sea into an apocalyptic terror.

The edge of the Norwegian continental shelf is an underwater cliff that runs for six hundred miles along the Atlantic Basin. And one autumn day around 6225-6170 BCE, this cliff collapsed. An estimated 770 cubic miles, or over 50 Mount Everests, of rock broke off and slid into the deep ocean. The rubble flow reached a speed of 90 mph underwater.