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Mon, 26 Feb 2018
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Volcanoes


Fire

Russia's Hephaestus mud volcano erupts chucking muck hundreds of meters (VIDEO)

hephaetus mud volcano
On February 22, 2018, the volcano, located in Taman, in Krasnodar Territory of Russia, erupted, covering several acres of land with mud and cracking down the Earth across its 500-meter large crater.

There are about 40 mud volcanoes - some active and other sleeping - in this remote area of Russia. Taman is indeed mainly visited for its miracle mud. The most popular volcano in Taman is "Hephaestus" - also known as Rotten Mountain and situated near Temryuk.

Comment: As noted above, apparently it's fairly fancy muck and people visit to bathe in it, when it's not erupting:

hephaestus
From 2015, one of the volcanoes was documented erupting on film:

The world is rocking and rolling these days: And could this be related to: Scientists predict upsurge in major earthquakes for 2018 due to slowdown in Earth's rotation


Attention

USGS reports Kilauea volcano wall collapse in Hawaii

Kilauea volcano
© USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
Kilauea volcano
Volcanic activity on Kilauea volcano's East Rift Zone continues, and scientists with the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory are documenting it.

On February 10 at 8:21 in the morning, a large portion of the northeastern rim of the west pit in Pu'u O'o collapsed. Prior to and during the rim collapse, the adjacent ground also subsided.

There have been several active breakouts and lava channels on the Pulama pali over the past few days.


Attention

Ebeko Volcano on Kurils, Russia sends two-kilometer ash plume into air

Explosive event at Ebeko volcano on 23 May, 2017
© Dr Janine Krippner
Explosive event at Ebeko volcano on 23 May, 2017
Volcano Ebeko is a natural sight featuring quite often in news reports, as it frequently stages spectacular "ash" shows for those living on Russia's Sakhalin island as well as guests to the picturesque Far Eastern region.

On Saturday, the volcano, which lies on Paramushir island on the Northern Kurils sent up into the air an ash plume of about 2 kilometers above the sea level. "The ash cloud has moved east of the volcano," a report by a local volcano eruption response unit [KVERT] of Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, the Russian Academy of Sciences, reads.

Fire

75 years ago humanity witnessed the birth of Paricutín Volcano in Oaxaca, Mexico

The volcano of Parícutin soon after its birth in 1943. Photo by K. Segerstrom

The volcano of Parícutin soon after its birth in 1943. Photo by K. Segerstrom
On February 20, 1943, the farmer Dionisio Pulido observed the birth of a volcano. For weeks the ground near the village of Uruapan, about 200 miles west of Mexico City, had been trembling and deep underground rumblings were heard. That day the earth rose up more than six feet and from a fissure ash and vapors were emitted with a loud hissing sound. In the night a cone of ash formed. Another farmer, Celedonio Gutierrez, described the scene as follows: "In the evening, when night began to fall, we heard noises like the surge of the sea, and red flames of fire rose into the darkened sky, some rising 2,600 feet or more into the air, that burst like golden marigolds, and a rain like artificial fire fell to the ground."


Headphones

Infrasound microphones could predict volcano eruptions before they hit

Villarrica volcano.

Villarrica volcano, Chile
Sound recording equipment is getting better all the time. Researchers from Boise State University, Stanford University, and Chile's University of Concepcion have just found a new, very specific application for low-frequency microphones, however, potentially helping to predict the eruption of certain volcanoes around the world.

Their technology involves monitoring inaudible low frequencies, called infrasound, which are produced by a type of active volcano such as the in southern Chile.

"Many volcanoes produce energetic infrasound — not ultrasound — which is low-frequency sound that travels long distances through the atmosphere and can be recorded with specialized microphophones," Jeffrey Johnson, an associate professor of geophysics at Boise State, told Digital Trends. "Although humans can't perceive infrasound, it can be incredibly energetic."


Attention

A single volcano can change Earth's atmosphere - expert

Lava cascades down the slopes of the erupting Mayon volcano in January 2018. Seen from Busay Village in Albay province, 210 miles southeast of Manila, Philippines.
© Dan Amaranto
Lava cascades down the slopes of the erupting Mayon volcano in January 2018. Seen from Busay Village in Albay province, 210 miles southeast of Manila, Philippines.
A single volcano can change the world's atmosphere, even permanently, depending on the intensity of the volcanic eruption, a pollution expert said.

According to Mylene Cayetano, PhD, the head of the Environmental Pollution Studies Laboratory of the Institute of Environmental Science and Meteorology at University of the Philippines Diliman, on top of being a fiery spectacle of nature, volcanoes are a force to be reckoned with.

"A single volcano has the ability to completely change the world's entire atmosphere, maybe even permanently," Cayetano said in statement. Cayetano issued the statement in light of the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs) statement that Mayon's restiveness is still far from the peak of explosion, which may come in the coming weks.

According to Cayetano, Southeast Asia is one of the most geologically active regions, of the world, if not the most, and had been home to the most destructive and powerful volcanic eruptions in history. Mayon, one of the world's renowned volcanoes because of its almost-perfect conical shape, is the most active volcano in the Philippines.

Comment: See also: Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Sinabung eruption signals 'year without a summer' cycle (VIDEO)

'Red notice' issued to airlines as Sinabung volcano eruption shoots ash 16,000ft in Indonesia (VIDEOS)

Motorists halted by heavy ash fall from Mayon Volcano, Philippines


Attention

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Sinabung eruption signals 'year without a summer' cycle (VIDEO)

Sinabung eruption February 2018
© Agence France -Presse/Anto Sembiring
Indonesian schoolchildren walk together at Sipandak elementary school in Tiga Pancur village in Karo, North Sumatra on Feb. 19, 2018, as thick volcanic ash from Mount Sinabung volcano rises into the air following another eruption. Sinabung roared back to life in 2010 for the first time in 400 years and has remained highly active since.
The awakening of Sinabung among other volcanoes awakening on a multi century cycle, indicates that the grand solar minimum intensification of intense eruptions has begun. This latest eruption of Sinabung has sent ash 17KM/55,000ft into the atmosphere which reached the troposphere and will spread across Asia. Iceland awakens as well and the world is not ready to handle another "Year Without a Summer" which this signals. Good luck in your preparations.


Comment: For related articles see also:


Fire

Yellowstone: 200 quakes in just 10 days after warning that magma is causing strain on the surface

According to experts with the US Geological Survey, the latest swarm began on February 8 in a region roughly eight miles northeast of West Yellowstone, Montana – and, it’s increased dramatically in the days since
© USGS volcanoes
According to experts with the US Geological Survey, the latest swarm began on February 8 in a region roughly eight miles northeast of West Yellowstone, Montana – and, it’s increased dramatically in the days since
A new swarm of earthquakes has cropped up at the Yellowstone supervolcano, with more than 200 small temblors detected in the last 10 days alone.

According to experts with the US Geological Survey, the latest swarm began on February 8 in a region roughly eight miles northeast of West Yellowstone, Montana - and, it's increased dramatically in the days since.

But for now, scientists say there's no reason to worry.

While the earthquakes are likely caused by a combination of processes beneath the surface, the current activity is said to be 'relatively weak,' and the alert level at the supervolcano remains at 'normal.'

Comment: We're seeing a marked increase in various kinds of geological activity lately, could it be related to scientists' predictions that major earthquakes for 2018 due to slowdown in Earth's rotation? Also check out our monthly documentary: SOTT Earth Changes Summary - January 2018: Extreme Weather, Planetary Upheaval, Meteor Fireballs


Attention

'Red notice' issued to airlines as Sinabung volcano eruption shoots ash 16,000ft in Indonesia (VIDEOS)

Mount Sinabung spews volcanic ash as it erupts
© Endro Rusharyanto / AP
Mount Sinabung spews volcanic ash as it erupts in Kutarakyat, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Monday, Feb. 19, 2018. Rumbling Mount Sinabung on the Indonesian island of Sumatra has shot billowing columns of ash more than 5,000 meters (16,400 feet) into the atmosphere and hot clouds down its slopes.

A warning notice was issued to airlines after a rumbling volcano in Indonesia shot billowing columns of ash more than 16,000 feet into the atmosphere.

Mount Sinabung on the island of Sumatra erupted on Monday morning, sending hot clouds down its slopes.

The National Disaster Mitigation Agency said there were no fatalities or injuries.

The volcano, one of three currently erupting in Indonesia, was dormant for four centuries before exploding in 2010, killing two people.


Fire

'Worst case scenario': Kikai volcano set to erupt and could kill 100 million people

A lava flow
© Richard Bouhet / AFP
A lava flow
A magma reservoir potentially hidden behind an underwater volcanic crater could have civilization-ending results if it ever erupts, according to Japanese scientists.

Experts from the Kobe University Ocean Bottom Exploration Center (KOBEC) have confirmed that a giant caldera or large crater exists in the Japanese Archipelago. The crater, measuring 32 cubic kilometers, is said to be the largest of its kind and the result of an explosive underwater eruption 7,300 years ago, according to their latest study.

Sitting between the Pacific and Philippine Sea Oceanic plates, Japan is a hotbed for seismic activity, which is why scientists are keen on updating methods of predicting natural disasters. The KOBEC team has been carrying out detailed surveys of the area and published their findings in Scientific Reports.

Comment: Massive lava dome lurks underneath Japan's Ōsumi Islands