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Sun, 29 Mar 2020
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Wildfires


Fire

Residents horrified as wildfire consumes all around them in nightmarish scenes in Argentina

Argentina wildfires
© Twitter / @machirulaPro
Evacuations are underway and firefighters have been deployed en masse after a wildfire broke out near the town of Esquel in Argentina's Chubut province. Residents watched in despair as their homestead became a fiery hellscape.

At least 90 firefighters are working tirelessly to extinguish the flames before the outbreak can spread any further. Firefighting planes, helicopters, along with numerous fire engines and tankers have been scrambled to help battle the blaze, which is spreading rapidly across the dry grasslands in the area. An eyewitness video shows the nightmare unfolding.

High temperatures in recent days rendered conditions perfect for such a bushfire to break out and the nearby highway Route 259 was closed temporarily as flames encroached on that main transport artery.


Attention

Global crop failures continue: In Australia this is going to be the WORST HARVEST ever recorded

Australia on a globe
Global food production is being hit from seemingly every side. Thanks to absolutely crazy weather patterns, giant locust armies in Africa and the Middle East, and an unprecedented outbreak of African Swine Fever in China, a lot less food is being produced around the world than originally anticipated. Even during the best of years we really struggle to feed everyone on the planet, and so a lot of people are wondering what is going to happen as global food supplies become tighter and tighter. The mainstream media in the United States is so obsessed with politics right now that they haven't been paying much attention to this emerging crisis, but the truth is that this growing nightmare is only going to intensify in the months ahead.

In Australia, conditions have been extremely hot and extremely dry, and that helped to fuel the horrific wildfires that we recently witnessed.

And everyone knew that agricultural production in Australia was going to be disappointing this year, but it turns out that it is actually going to be the worst ever recorded...
Australia's hottest and driest year on record has slashed crop production, with summer output expected to fall to the lowest levels on record, according to official projections released Tuesday.

The country's agriculture department said it expects production of crops like sorghum, cotton and rice to fall 66 percent — the lowest levels since records began in 1980-81.

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Arrow Up

State of The Climate Report 2020

The Climate is fine, but climate science is a catastrophe - and Congressional Democrats demand a censorship plan from Google by tomorrow.
AP News Clip

Stock Up

Australia's wild weather tipped to wreak havoc on grocery bills

Coles online shopping website, 20 January 2020.
© Coles online shopping website, 20 January 2020.
Australians at supermarket checkouts could be the next to feel the effects of the wild weather that has decimated entire crops and limited the supply of goods. Here are some of the products you may need to budget a higher price tag for in the next few months.

The ongoing bushfires that have been ravaging the country since September 2019 - combined with a prolonged and severe drought in many areas - have weighed heavily on farmers and the delivery of fresh food and will result in short-term price increases on fruit and vegetables, according to vegetable industry association AUSVEG.

In fact, people who shop for their groceries online with Coles may have already noticed some items are unavailable due to "bushfires and subsequent road closures".

Industry experts and the government have said that in addition to fruit and vegetables, a number of other products such as honey, milk, wine and meat could go up in price as well.

And it doesn't come at a great time, given people are feeling less motivated to spend while their fellow Australians are suffering, according to AMP Capital Chief Economist Shane Oliver.

"The constant terrible news since October about the bushfires along with the smoke in cities is likely weighing further on the national psyche adding to weakness in consumer spending," Dr Oliver said earlier this month in an analysis of the bushfires' impact on the Australian economy.

Wild weather events have continued since he made that point, with widespread rainfall giving the fireys some reprieve, but also bringing massive hail, floods and dust storms.

AUSVEG and other groups have urged Australians who can afford to do so to keep buying produce to support farmers and regional communities in their recovery from these events. The Australian Government has so far made grants of up to $75,000 available for farmers and other primary producers who have been impacted by the fires.

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Cloud Grey

'Fire clouds': After Australia, scientists warn the erratic weather phenomenon could become a new reality

A pyrocumulonimbus cloud formation is seen from a plane as bush fires continue in New South Wales, Australia, on Jan. 4, 2020
© Aidan Morrison / @Quixoticquant/Reuters
A pyrocumulonimbus cloud formation is seen from a plane as bush fires continue in New South Wales, Australia, on Jan. 4, 2020.
In 2016, a wildfire so large and destructive that it was nicknamed "The Beast" tore through Fort McMurray, a town in northeastern Alberta surrounded by boreal forests in the middle of the Canadian province's oil-rich tar sands.

More than 88,000 people were evacuated, and 2,400 homes and buildings were destroyed in the inferno. It would become one of the costliest and most destructive wildfires in the country's history, but scientists had other reasons to pay close attention to it.

As the fire raged and threatened to engulf the community, The Beast started to exhibit some odd behavior, growing so intense that it spawned "fire clouds" that created their own weather.

The rare weather phenomenon has most recently been observed in southeastern Australia, where unprecedented wildfires have burned more than 27 million acres of land and where more than 100 blazes are still active. And scientists say they're seeing fire clouds more often as climate change makes fire seasons longer and wildfires more intense.


Comment: Rather than attributing the dramatic increase in wildfires and fire clouds to 'climate change', could a significant factor in the escalation of these events be that they are fueled from outgassing, and then possibly 'sparked' by an increase in atmospheric electric discharge events, such as lightning strikes and other 'cosmic' ignition sources?


Researchers are only beginning to understand the consequences.

A fire cloud, known as a pyrocumulonimbus cloud, or pyroCb, can generate thunder, lightning and tornado-force winds, as well as belch out burning embers — all of which can help spread already fast-moving fires.

Comment: Australian wildfires are so massive, they're generating their own weather patterns


Bizarro Earth

NASA says smoke from Australian bushfires will soon circle the earth

Bushfire smoke near the International Space Station
© NASA
Bushfire smoke as seen near the International Space Station
Smoke from the massive bushfires in Australia will soon circle the Earth back to the nation, says Nasa.

Massive infernos have raged along the nation's east coast for months, pushing smoke across the Pacific.

Nasa said plumes from blazes around New Year's Day had crossed South America, turning skies there hazy, and moved "halfway around Earth" by 8 January.

"The smoke is expected to make at least one full circuit around the globe," the US space agency said.

Hundreds of bushfires have burnt across Australia, killing at least 28 people and destroying more than 2,000 homes.

Comment: Athletes participating in the 2020 Australian Open are struggling to breathe in the hazardous conditions. One player was forced to abandon her match after a coughing fit :






Fire

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Australia ash/smoke cloud circles Southern Hemisphere - Taal volcano erupts

Taal volcano in Philippines 'goes electric' January 2020
© BBC
Taal volcano in Philippines 'goes electric' January 2020
Dust, ask and smoke in both hemispheres causing strange weather extremes. Australia ash/smoke cloud from fires passed over New Zealand causing summer snow, South America next for that plume to pass over. Taal erupts in Philippines on the same low solar activity lows as was seen in 1913 which we reached in Dec 2019. Dust storms the length of Australia add to the blowing ash/smoke from the wildfires there. Question: How much debris in our atmosphere does it take before temperatures drop?


Comment: Taal Volcano near Manila, Philippines erupts for first time in 50 years - Onlookers stunned by electric display


Fire

California wildfires not caused by climate change - experts

California wildfires
© Reuters / Gene Blevins
A panel of experts said Wednesday that California's devastating wildfires were caused primarily by "the way we manage lands and develop our landscape" rather than climate change.

Speaking at the annual conference of the National Council for Science and the Environment in Washington D.C., Scott Stephens, a professor of fire science at the University of California, Berkeley, said that perhaps 20 to 25 percent of the wildfire damage resulted from climate change, whereas "75 percent is the way we manage lands and develop our landscape."

Stephens noted that in past centuries, wildfires were far more widespread than they are today, and played a vital role in California's ecosystem by helping to thin forests, Thomas Frank reported for E&E News.

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Fire

Nearly a quarter of a million Australians urged to flee as huge wildfires revitalize

A large plume of smoke is seen over a sheep property in the Parndana region on Kangaroo Island, Australia
© Lisa Maree Williams / Getty Images
A large plume of smoke is seen over a sheep property in the Parndana region on Kangaroo Island, Australia, on Thursday. Residents of the Kangaroo Island township of Parndana and Vivonne Bay have been told to evacuate as fire threatens both areas.
Australian authorities urged nearly a quarter of a million people to evacuate their homes and prepared military backup as soaring temperatures and erratic winds were expected to fan deadly wildfires across the east coast.

Temperatures were expected to shoot well above 104 degrees Fahrenheit in several parts of the country Friday, accompanied by high winds, threatening to inflame fires that have already left thousands of people homeless.

"If you can get out, you should get out, you shouldn't be in the remote and forested parts of our State," Andrew Crisp, emergency management commissioner for the state of Victoria, told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Emergency alert text messages had been sent to 240,000 people in Victoria state alone, telling them to leave, Crisp said. People in high-risk regions in New South Wales and South Australia states were also urged to think about leaving, but authorities had not provided numbers.


Fire

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Behind the Australian bushfires - What you're not told

A kangaroo rushes past a burning house amid apocalyptic scenes in Conjola, New South Wales
© Matthew Abbott / New York Times / Redux / eyevine
A kangaroo rushes past a burning house amid apocalyptic scenes in Conjola, New South Wales
Australia continues with its wildfires but what is missing from the story is that 205 of those fires were deliberately set and during the first week of 2020 25+ locations in the country set their all time lowest cold record for January. There is much to the story with the prime minister off on a Hawaiian holiday at the most critical moments. Here is the story the corporate media left out.


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