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Sat, 25 Feb 2017
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Lead levels elevated in bloodstreams of 6K Southern California workers

© News Tribune
Shipyard workers exposed to lead.
Increased lead levels have been found in the blood of more than 6,000 construction and manufacturing workers in California, a new report says. Such increases can lead to problems such as kidney disease and hypertension.

The report by the California Department of Health's Occupational Lead Poisoning Prevention Program, contains the results of blood tests conducted on 38,440 workers between the years of 2012 and 2014. Of the workers tested, 6,051 were found to have elevated levels of lead in their bloodstream, which is defined as five micrograms or more per deciliter (about 3.3 ounces) of blood.

Most of those found to have elevated levels of lead in their system were men between the ages of 20 and 59, and had Hispanic surnames. Many lived in Southern California, particularly in Los Angeles, Riverside, and San Bernardino counties.

A total of 14,002 workers had two or more blood lead level (BLL) tests, of which 2,782 (20 percent) were found to have elevated lead levels multiple times. Such chronic exposure increases the risk for health effects including hypertension, kidney disease, cognitive dysfunction, and adverse reproductive outcomes, according to the report.

Comment: Companies put on notice by regulatory agencies, such as OSHA, tend to make deals. They opt to lower the settlement penalty by promising to fix safety and health issues in exchange for not having to admit fault or liability for violations alleged to have taken place. This obviously lets the company off the hook for major medical culpability. Workers should determine if safety and health issues are being met with their interests in mind when they take jobs in toxic conditions.


Evil Rays

On the road to 5G: New technology being pushed with no safety testing

The FCC (Federal Communications Commission) is pushing to streamline the approval of 5G cell towers, overriding the little regulation that exists to legalize use of experimental high frequencies without extensive safety testing. Untested frequencies in the range of 28 gigahertz to 100 Ghz or more are set to be deployed all around us without our consent, emanating from an even greater number of new, smaller cell towers.
"To make this work, the 5G buildout is going to be very infrastructure intensive, requiring massive deployment of small cells." ~Tom Wheeler, Former FCC Chairman and corporate lobbyist
Some are talking about using even higher frequencies, in the terahertz range, much higher than previous networks.

A recent statement from Take Back Your Power says:
"US FCC wants to "streamline" the approval process for DAS (Distributed Antenna System) 4G/5G ubiquitous cell towers by exempting them from the 1996 Telecommunications Act!

And the US Senate will imminently be voting on S.19 and S.88, to expand DAS 4G/5G deployment!

If such efforts succeed, millions of small cell towers (on existing light poles/utility poles, or new ones) will be deployed everywhere, throughout residential neighborhoods. The millimeter microwave radiation deployed will produce horrific health effects, worsening EVERYONE's health, and will remove the remaining pollinators. It's THAT serious. The bees in particular will die off rapidly, per studies of bees and microwave radiation."

Comment: Telecom company's patent admits: Non-thermal exposures to wireless radiation is "genotoxic", causes "clear damage to hereditary material"


Biohazard

Dirty Vaccines: Every human vaccine tested in new study was contaminated with metals and debris

Researchers examining 44 samples of 30 different vaccines found dangerous contaminants, including red blood cells in one vaccine and metal toxicants in every single sample tested - except in one animal vaccine.

Using extremely sensitive new technologies not used in vaccine manufacturing, Italian scientists reported they were "baffled" by their discoveries which included single particles and aggregates of organic debris including red cells of human or possibly animal origin and metals including lead, tungsten, gold, and chromium, that have been linked to autoimmune disease and leukemia.

In the study, published this week in the International Journal of Vaccines and Vaccination, the researchers led by Antoinetta Gatti, of the National Council of Research of Italy and the Scientific Director of Nanodiagnostics, say their results "show the presence of micro- and nano-sized particulate matter composed of inorganic elements in vaccine samples" not declared in the products' ingredients lists.

Lead particles were found in the cervical cancer vaccines, Gardasil and Cevarix, for example, and in the seasonal flu vaccine Aggripal manufactured by Novartis as well as in the Meningetec vaccine meant to protect against meningitis C.

Samples of an infant vaccine called Infarix Hexa (against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, poliomyelitis and haemophilus influenzae type B) manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline was found to contain stainless steel, tungsten and a gold-zinc aggregate.

Other metal contaminants included platinum, silver, bismuth, iron, and chromium. Chromium (alone or in alloy with iron and nickel) was identified in 25 of the human vaccines from Italy and France that were tested.

GSK's Fluarix vaccine for children three years and older contained 11 metals and aggregates of metals. Similar aggregates to those identified in the vaccines have been shown to be prevalent in cases of leukemia, the researchers noted.

Comment: Failures of vaccines continue


Biohazard

US scientists-drinking from plastic bottles while pregnant may lead to child obesity

© Michaela Begsteiger / www.globallookpress.com
A new study has linked drinking from a plastic bottle during pregnancy with child obesity, stating that it could be triggered by the endocrine-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA).

BPA is used in plastics and resins and is found in a variety of food containers. It is also a component in metal can coatings, which protect the food from directly contacting metal surfaces. Although it hasn't been comprehensively proven that BPA poses a direct health risk, it has been closely studied since 2008 over safety concerns.

It is known that small amounts of packaging materials may transfer into food when the two come into contact.

Brain

Total recall: the people who never forget

An extremely rare condition may transform our understanding of memory

If you ask Jill Price to remember any day of her life, she can come up with an answer in a heartbeat. What was she doing on 29 August 1980? "It was a Friday, I went to Palm Springs with my friends, twins, Nina and Michelle, and their family for Labour Day weekend," she says. "And before we went to Palm Springs, we went to get them bikini waxes. They were screaming through the whole thing." Price was 14 years and eight months old.

What about the third time she drove a car? "The third time I drove a car was January 10 1981. Saturday. Teen Auto. That's where we used to get our driving lessons from." She was 15 years and two weeks old.

Comment: Also see: Some People Never Forget a Face


Health

Better than botox: The benefits of niacin for skincare

Skincare products make up a staggering $20 billion dollar a year industry in America alone. It seems that there is always some new miracle lotion or cream on the market that promises drastic results. Scientists and doctors devote huge amounts of time to developing these products because they are so lucrative. Every so often an ingredient really does have an amazing effect on skin. Niacin and niacinamide (a form of the vitamin B3) is one such ingredient, with plenty of studies and research to back up the benefits.

What is Niacin?

You've probably heard of niacin before, but perhaps in a nutritional context. Niacin is found in milk, eggs, green leafy vegetables, beans, cereals, yeast, and in some types of fish. It's required by the body in order to properly metabolize fats and sugars and in the maintenance of cells and a lack of niacin can lead to indigestion, fatigue, depression, and a serious deficiency called Pellagra. Though niacin is found in food, research has shown that to achieve increased benefits for the skin, it takes more than what we typically receive in our diets.

Pills

Russian Academy of Sciences claims homeopathy is 'pseudoscience'

© Grigoriy Sisoev / Sputnik
The Russian Academy of Sciences has called homeopathy a "pseudoscience" with no scientific basis, saying that its methods contradict chemical, physical and biological laws. The academy also stressed that homeopathy is not to be confused with phytotherapy.

The memorandum on homeopathy was released by the Commission to Combat Pseudoscience and Falsification of Scientific Research, a part of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Russian chief scientific body, on Monday.

The treatment with ultra-low doses of various substances used in homeopathy has no scientific basis," the commission statement said, adding that the principles of such treatment contradict all known"chemical, physical and biological laws."

Comment: Further reading: Homeopathy: The memory of water is a reality
The concept of the memory of water goes back to 1988 when the late Professor Jacques Benveniste published, in the international scientific journal Nature, claims that extremely high 'ultramolecular' dilutions of an antibody had effects in the human basophil degranulation test, a laboratory model of immune response. In other words, the water diluent 'remembered' the antibody long after it was gone. His findings were subsequently denounced as 'pseudoscience' and yet, despite the negative impact this had at the time, the idea has not gone away.

In this special issue of Homeopathy, scientists from the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Italy, Russia, USA as well as the UK present remarkably convergent views from groups using entirely different methods, indicating that large-scale structural effects can occur in liquid water, and can increase with time. Such effects might account for claims of memory of water effects.

Commenting on the special issue, Professor Chaplin said: "Science has a lot more to discover about such effects and how they might relate to homeopathy. It is unjustified to dismiss homeopathy, as some scientists do, just because we don't have a full understanding of how it works." In his overview he is critical of the "unscientific rhetoric" of some scientists who reject the memory of water concept "with a narrow view of the subject and without any examination or appreciation of the full body of evidence."



Info

The importance of informed consent: You might be in a medical experiment and not even know it

In the long view, modern history is the story of increasing rights of control over your body - for instance, in matters of reproduction, sex, where you live and whom you marry. Medical experimentation is supposed to be following the same historical trend - increasing rights of autonomy for those whose bodies are used for research.

Indeed, the Nuremberg Code, the founding document of modern medical research ethics developed after the Second World War in response to Nazi medical experiments, stated unequivocally that the voluntary, informed consent of the human subject is essential. Every research ethics code since then has incorporated this most fundamental principle. Exceptions to this rule are supposed to be truly exceptional.

Yet today, more and more medical experimenters in the United States appear to circumvent getting the voluntary, informed consent of those whose bodies are being used for research. What's more, rather than fighting this retrograde trend, some of the most powerful actors in medical research are defending it as necessary to medical progress.

Padlock

Health freedom and the government's real war on natural health

© National Vaccine Information Center
In 1994, after a lifelong aversion to politics, I ran for a seat in the US Congress out of the 29th District in Los Angeles. My platform was Health Freedom.

At the time, the FDA was raiding offices of natural practitioners, and threatening to cut off citizens' access to a full range of nutritional supplements.

I watched a trial, if you can call it that, in downtown Los Angeles, in which the federal government was prosecuting a young man for selling, and making health claims about, a substance that occurs naturally in the body.

The defendant told the Judge he was prepared to present extensive evidence that the substance was safe and effective. The Judge refused, saying the only issue was: did the defendant violate an FDA rule? If so, he was guilty. At that point, the trial was over, and indeed, the Judge soon pronounced a verdict and the young man was led away to serve a prison sentence in a federal lockup.

At that moment, I began to construct my case against the State, and consider what Health Freedom was all about.

Shoe

Why we have to work harder today to avoid weight gain compared to 30 years ago

© Mike Powell/Allsport/GettyImages
If you are 40 years old now, you’d have to eat even less and exercise more than if you were a 40-year-old in 1971 to prevent gaining weight.
The 1980s really were the good old days when it comes to eating, exercise, and weight loss. Why? The authors of a new study suggest it's more difficult for today's adults to maintain the same weight as their counterparts two to three decades ago, even when the amount of food and exercise are equal.

In other words, a 30-something today who eats 2,000 calories per day and exercises two hours per week is likely to be about 10 percent heavier than a 30-something living in the 1980s who followed the same lifestyle habits. How can that be?
This is definitely not great news for people today, especially those who are struggling to maintain a healthy weight.
It was a surprise to the team at York University in Toronto, who set out to identify whether the relationship between obesity and the number of calories consumed, amount of physical exercise, and intake of macronutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrates) has changed over time. To accomplish this goal, they evaluated the dietary data of 36,400 Americans between 1971 and 2008 and the exercise data of 14,419 individuals between 1988 and 2006.

Comment: See also: