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Sat, 21 Oct 2017
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The 7 threats of EMF technology

Recently, over 180 medics and scientists sent a document to the European Union appealing for the suspension of the new 5G EMF technology planned to roll out. Essentially, the 11-page document warns that EMF technology is a serious environmental hazard, harmful to life and that the new 5G EMF technology has not been properly tested for safety and has been blindly approved without health evaluation. The medics and scientists call for a proper health evaluation and while being carried out a suspension of 5G.

However, the unconditional push for EMF technology continues. The push involves a number of individuals, particularly those in high places, biased and blinded by money or the want for control, only seeing the EMF technology's advantages. Flawed ideology and insanity ensues...

In reflection of this, if allowed to continue uncontested, here are 7 ways by which EMF technology seriously threatens not just the health and life of humans, but also endangers the existence of non-human populations through upsetting the delicate balance of life. Remember, without nature's delicate and intricate balance we will cease to exist.

Comment: See also:


Syringe

Experts warn that U.S. isn't prepared for a flu pandemic

© Heidi Heilbrunn/Special
As the U.S. begins its annual flu season, experts warn that the country is ill-prepared for a pandemic flu that could cause widespread disruption and death.

In a webinar Tuesday with the Association of Health Care Journalists, flu experts outlined potential problems that will occur if and when there is another flu pandemic. Those occur when there is a large mutation in the current circulating flu viruses that it is unlike previous strains or the emergence of a wholly new kind of strain, often from one that jumps from animals like chickens or pigs to humans, said Dr. Sonja Olsen, deputy chief of the Epidemiology and Prevention Branch in the Flu Division at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Since 2013, the CDC has been monitoring an avian influenza strain called H7N9 that has caused some human infections, increasing from 135 cases to 759 in the last season that ended in August. About 70 percent of those patients ended up in intensive care units and 40 percent died, she said. However, the virus has not shown yet it can pass very well from human to human, Olsen said.

In an analysis published in recent months, scientists looked carefully at the virus strain and tried to see if it could be made to create certain mutations that would make it more adaptable to humans, known as "gain of function" studies, she said. They noted that it already had some mutations similar to strains that caused pandemics in 1957 and 1968. And that with a few small changes, it could adapt to attack human cells that line the airway, Olsen said.

Comment: Scaremongering to ensure people get a flu shot?


Sun

Kids who spend more time outdoors could have better eyesight

The ready availability of technology may make the children of today faster at configuring a new smartphone, but does all of that screen time affect the development of their eyes?

While conventional wisdom dictates that children should do less up-close viewing, sit farther from the television and perhaps even wear their eyeglasses less, we have found in recent studies that another factor may be at play: Kids need to go outside, and, if not play, at least get some general exposure to outdoor light.

To our surprise, more time outdoors had a protective effect and reduced the chances that a child would go on to need myopic refractive correction in the future. The size of the effect was impressive.

Comment: See also:
Regular exposure to sunlight is one of the best ways to protect or improve your vision
Time spent outdoors reduces risk of childhood myopia
Sunlight exposure could reduce your risk of becoming nearsighted


2 + 2 = 4

Wise traditions: The Inupiat's fight for the right to be well nourished

In Alaskan nursing homes and hospitals, tight federal regulations have meant that the most comforting foods for natives have been labeled illegal. That's slowly changing.


Muktuk, fresh pieces of whale skin and blubber, during the preparation of the uunaaliq on May 4, 2007, in Barrow, Alaska.
One afternoon in 2014, May Bernhardt, an 87-year-old Inupiat Eskimo with stringy gray hair, toothlessly chewed a banana. The fruit was perfectly ripe and a good source of fiber and potassium, but she hated it.

Bernhardt lives in a nursing home in the Alaskan Arctic, and like the other Inupiat elders in the home, she was accustomed to being served imported foods from faraway climes. But she and the others craved the traditional Inupiat foods they grew up eating. Most of them were raised in the bush of northwestern Alaska living a mostly subsistence lifestyle, eating caribou, fish, wild tundra berries, and marine mammals like seals and whales. Once they moved into the nursing home, a wooden building atop stilts drilled into permafrost beneath the grassy tundra, they had to eat what the home provided. And that meant bananas, green beans, potatoes, and pasta.

Comment:


Brain

Does acupuncture work by re-mapping the brain?

Acupuncture is a form of traditional medical therapy that originated in China several thousand years ago. It was developed at a time bereft of tools such as genetic testing or even a modern understanding of anatomy, so medical philosophers did the best they could with what was available - herbs, animal products and rudimentary needles. In the process, perhaps, they stumbled on an effective medical approach.

In the past century, some modernisation has taken place. For instance, acupuncture has been paired with electrical currents, allowing for stimulation to be more continuous and to penetrate deeper into the body. This approach was termed electro-acupuncture and represents a convergence between the ancient practice of acupuncture therapy and modern forays into targeted electrostimulation delivered to the skin or nerves. Such approaches have attracted the attention of the pharmaceutical industry and are part of a growing class of neuromodulatory therapies.

Comment: Why acupuncture works:


Syringe

It's "flu-shot season" again: What you may not know about the flu shot

It's "flu-shot season" again, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) continues to push vaccines on the population (pregnant women and infants included), in a futile effort to prevent cases of influenza. Towards the end of every season, we hear from the CDC that the efficacy of the vaccine was 62% or 58% or lower. But it is even worse. The percentages reported by the CDC are based on the ability to match the most prevalent strains of flu infections each year with the flu "antigens" used in the yearly shot. This does NOT take into account whether the flu shot actually confers any type of immunity to the patient. In fact, the prestigious Cochrane Review in 2014 stated that the flu vaccination "shows no appreciable effect on working days lost or hospitalization." Moreover, out of an average of 71 individuals receiving the flu shot, only one case of the flu was prevented.

Comment: Science paper accidentally admits most flu shots don't work
Earlier this month, the University of Ghent, Belgium, released a paper where it accidentally admitted that most flu shots are continuously out of date and therefore don't work.

"Current flu vaccines are only effective against virus strains that match the vaccine strains. Consequently, the strains in the human flu vaccines are updated every few years, based on recommendations by the World Health Organization," the press release read.

They are not the only ones to admit that vaccines are a fraud. Previously, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also agreed that the flu shot fails most of the time, as reported by Vaccine Impact. In fact, instead of preventing disease, flu shots can make people more susceptible to disease.

The CDC has promoted the flu vaccine for years, promising that it is effective at preventing illness in 70 to 90 percent of all cases, adding that type A and B influenza cause over 200,000 hospitalizations and 36,000 deaths in the U.S. every year. In April, however, the CDC had to backtrack and instead had to admit it was wrong.



Question

Researchers are investigating whether antidepressants might be useful for prophylactic purposes

© Everyday Health
Mental health appears to be dwindling across the globe, with depression now being the leading cause of ill health and disability worldwide.1,2 Over the past decade alone (2005 to 2015), rates of depression increased by 18 percent.3 In the U.S., more than 16 million people struggle with the condition, including 6 million seniors,4 and 11 percent of Americans over the age of 12 are on antidepressant drugs. Among women in their 40s and 50s, 1 in 4 is on antidepressants.5

Clearly, something is very wrong. Part of the problem, I believe, is the fact that the go-to solution simply doesn't work, and the psychiatric field is slow to branch out into more effective yet less financially rewarding strategies. Antidepressants tend to be the first-line treatment, even though studies have proven they work no better than placebo.6,7,8,9

Now, researchers are investigating whether antidepressants might be prophylactically useful. The idea that taking a potent brain-altering drug that has the clinical effectiveness of a placebo to prevent depression is suspect in the extreme. There are many other strategies with far better track records that can both prevent and help treat depression.

Penis Pump

Top unnecessary medical treatments - according to scientists

© Atthapon Raksthaput/Shutterstock
A recent literature study on medical care in the US has put forward ten diagnostic procedures and treatments that were overused in 2016, with the intention of highlighting ways that the medical system could be made more effective and more efficient.

Medicine is often a numbers game. While doctors do a smashing job with limited resources, sometimes striking a balance between time and costs means pills and procedures get prescribed without the patient's best interests in mind.

Syringe

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.: Time to pay real attention to children's health

© WMP clip
Every year, the President of the United States issues a proclamation in honor of Child Health Day (the first Monday of October), which in turn launches Children's Health Month. President Calvin Coolidge was the first president to dedicate a special day to children's health, in 1928, recognizing that "the conservation and promotion of child health places upon us a grave responsibility." The U.S. is not living up to that vital responsibility and, in fact, is failing children miserably. American children's ability to develop and thrive is being sabotaged by an avalanche of chronic ailments, with pediatric rates of some chronic conditions among the highest in the world.

Announcing the Campaign to Restore Child Health:


Comment: Robert Kennedy, Jr. fights to stop vaccine 'holocaust'


Syringe

Oh, Canada! Nearly 2,000 people completed doctor-assisted suicide in the year since bill was passed

© AFP Photo/PATRICK KOVARIK
Doctor-assisted suicide in Canada consists of a lethal injection in hospital or at home.
Nearly 2,000 people with incurable diseases were helped to die by a doctor in the first year since Canada legalized medically-assisted suicide, according to a report published Friday.

From the time Ottawa passed the legislation in June 2016 to June 30, 2017, 1,982 people ended their lives in this way, according to Health Canada.


Most had cancer, the agency said.

Extrapolating from the data collected for the first half of 2017, the number of assisted deaths is expected to rise but remain at less than two percent of all deaths nationwide this year -- "consistent with international experience," it said a statement.