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Mon, 27 Feb 2017
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Attention

Avoid serious infection with proper neti pot use

© Corbis/RT
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a warning about neti pots, which are nasal irrigation tools that look like genie lamps.

Along with other nasal irrigation systems, these devices use a saline, or saltwater, solution to treat congested sinuses, colds, and allergies. They're also used to moisten nasal passages exposed to dry indoor air.

The concept of nasal flushing is pretty simple. The spout of the neti pot is placed in one nostril and the head is tilted at about a 45 degree angle so the other nostril is lower. The pot is held high and the salty water flows in one nostril and out of the other, flushing out any debris with it.

These nasal rinse devices — which include bulb syringes, squeeze bottles, and battery-operated pulsed water devices — are usually safe and effective products when used and cleaned properly, says Eric A. Mann, MD, PhD, a doctor at FDA.

But using the wrong type of water for irrigation and/or improper cleaning of the devices can lead to serious infections - including some that are deadly, including Naegleria fowleri - better known as the "brain-eating" amoeba.

Researchers believe that two deaths in 2011 were caused by brain-eating amoebae that made its way into the victims' tap water, reports CBS:

Comment: See also:


Health

Boost alertness with cinnamon and peppermint

According to the results of a study at Wheeling Jesuit University, participants demonstrated increased alertness and decreased levels of frustration, anxiety and fatigue when exposed to peppermint and cinnamon scents.

Merely smelling or snorting cinnamon and peppermint can improve performance several types of memory tasks. Like many spices, both cinnamon and peppermint have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. So they could be expected to exert a range of health-boosting actions, and they do have a centuries-long history of medicinal use around the world.

Cinnamon is one of the most potent antioxidants in the world and regular consumption can lower blood sugar, help digestion, ease arthritis, lower blood pressure and even ward off Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. When it comes to the highest antioxidant values on the ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) scale, cinnamon comes in third only lower than clove and sumac.

Peppermint is a perfect spice when brainstorming. An energy booster, this scent invigorates the mind, promotes concentration and stimulates clear thinking. Smelling peppermint is linked to greater cognitive stamina, motivation and overall performance.

Health

Weight isn't an accurate gauge of metabolic health: One-third of slim American adults have pre-diabetes

It's often assumed that in order to develop type 2 diabetes, you have to be overweight. While it's true that excess weight is clearly associated with insulin resistance and diabetes, it's the insulin resistance — not necessarily the weight gain — that drives the disease.

As such, many people with a healthy weight are not metabolically healthy, putting them at risk of diseases like type 2 diabetes — even without being overweight or obese.

One of the greatest risk factors, according to University of Florida researchers, is actually inactivity, which drives up your risk of pre-diabetes regardless of your weight.

Inactivity Is Associated With Pre-Diabetes, Even if You're a Healthy Weight

If you were looking for motivation to get moving, this study, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, is as good as it gets.1

In a survey of more than 1,100 healthy-weight individuals, those who were inactive (physically active for less than 30 minutes per week) were more likely to have an A1C level of 5.7 or higher, which is considered to be pre-diabetic.

Among all the inactive participants (aged 20 and over), about one-quarter were either pre-diabetic or diabetic. When only those inactive people aged 40 and over were analyzed, the percentage rose to 40 percent.

Comment: See also:


Alarm Clock

Kentucky's opioid-stricken town of Manchester is thriving with pharmacies

© Paul Galewitz
A Family Drug Center pharmacy in Manchester, Ky., one of 11 pharmacies in the city of 1,500 people that fill prescriptions for opioid drugs
In a year, one county filled enough prescriptions for 150 doses of painkillers per resident.

Manchester, Kentucky —This economically depressed city in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains is an image of frozen-in-time decline: empty storefronts with faded facades, sagging power lines, and aged streets with few stoplights.

But there is one type of business that seems to thrive: pharmacies.

Eleven drug stores, mostly independents, are scattered about a tiny city of 1,500 people. Many have opened in the past decade—four in the past three years. And prescription pain drugs are one of the best-selling items—the very best seller at some.

Most pharmacies here and in surrounding Clay County (population 21,000) lack the convenience-store trappings of national chains like CVS or Walgreen's. They sell few items over the counter, focusing on prescriptions and little else.

Comment: A World of Hillbilly Heroin: The Hollowing Out of America, Up Close and Personal


SOTT Logo Radio

The Health & Wellness Show: Treatment Essentials with Dr. Mark Sircus

© Dr. Mark Sircus
On this episode of The Health and Wellness Show we are joined by Dr. Mark Sircus of drsircus.com. He is the Director of the International Medical Veritas Association, an acupuncturist and Doctor of Oriental and Pastoral Medicine and the author of several books on natural allopathic medicine including Treatment Essentials: Practicing Natural Allopathic Medicine, Sodium Bicarbonate: Nature's Unique First Aid Remedy, and Iodine - Bringing Back the Universal Medicine. Join us as we discuss natural (and inexpensive) ways to boost your health and well-being with magnesium, iodine, selenium, sodium bicarbonate and more!

Running Time: 01:11:16

Download: OGG, MP3


Listen live, chat, and call in to future shows on the SOTT Radio Network!


Microscope 2

Microbes that helped us evolve now make us sick

© The Why Files
Between the mid-1990s and the mid-2000s alone, the likelihood of having a classmate with a food allergy increased by 20 per cent in the United States. In fact, over the past five decades, the incidence of all allergies and autoimmune diseases - caused by your body attacking itself - has skyrocketed. What could explain our sudden hypersensitivity to our surroundings and ourselves? Since evolution operates on the timescale of millennia, the culprits lie not in our genes but somewhere within our environment.

One thing that has changed in public health is our awareness of germs and how they spread. In response to that insight, over the past half-century our implementation of hygiene practices has spared us from debilitating infections and enormous human misery. But the new vigilance might have altered the development of our immune system, the collection of organs that fight infections and internal threats to our health.

The idea that too clean an environment might be harmful has been dubbed 'the hygiene hypothesis'. The concept has been perverted by some to suggest that the less clean the environment, the better. But its meaning is different: it is not dirt that we are missing but exposure to certain microbes that normally contribute to the development of our immune system. 'It's not that we aren't exposed enough to microbes but that we're not exposed to the right types of microbes,' says the immunobiologist Ruslan Medzhitov at the Yale School of Medicine, also head of the Food Allergy Science Initiative at the Broad Institute.

So what has changed? In short, it's the standard for what constitutes a good microbe versus a bad one. 'Take bacterial species that increase nutrient absorption from food,' Medzhitov says. These were immensely beneficial at a time where you had to go days without eating. Today in the parts of the world with an overabundance of food, having such bacteria in your intestine contributes to obesity. 'Microbes that cause intestinal inflammation are another example of what we call bad microbes because they induce [detrimental immune] responses. But in the past, these microbes could have protected you from intestinal pathogens,' he adds.

Eye 2

Rat-related disease infected three people discovered in New York City, 1 dead

A rare bacterial outbreak in New York City linked to rats has infected three people, one of whom died, according to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

Three people in one city block in the Bronx were diagnosed with leptospirosis within the last two months, after they had become severely ill, the department reported yesterday. One of the infected people, a man in his 30s, died.

"The Health Department has identified a cluster of three cases of leptospirosis on one block in the Concourse area of the Bronx," officials from the New York City Health Department said in a statement yesterday. "Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection that is most commonly spread by contact with rat urine and is very rarely spread from person to person. This illness can be serious, but is treatable with readily available antibiotics."

Two of the patients were diagnosed in December and one was diagnosed in February, the department said, after they were hospitalized with acute liver and kidney failure.

Brain

Certain neurological disorders occur in vaccinated children versus non-vaccinated children

© Health Blog
With all the hype from Big Pharma, federal and state health agencies and medical doctors regarding vaccines as being 'safe' with no adverse health problems from them, especially neurological, e.g., Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), the peer-review medical journal Frontiers in Psychiatry published on January 19, 2017 [1] some rather implicating study results titled "Temporal Association of Certain Neuropsychiatric Disorders Following Vaccination of Children and Adolescents: A Pilot Case—Control Study."

The study has five authors: one from the Department of Public Health Sciences, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and four co-authors from Yale Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine. One can't get more mainstreamed than that!

However the study results are not being lionized by the medical establishment. Interesting? Of course, because the researchers found implicating facts medicine and vaccinology do not want to own up to.

Comment: More information about vaccinated vs.unvaccinated children:


Info

Breastfeeding: Can it reduce a woman's risk of metabolic syndrome?

A new study shows that women who spend a longer time breastfeeding during their lifetimes may be able to lower their risk of metabolic syndrome and related disorders included elevated blood pressure, glucose, and triglyceride levels. Life-long breastfeeding of 12 months or longer was associated with a lower risk of metabolic syndrome, as reported in Journal of Women's Health.

The article entitled "Association Between Duration of Breast Feeding and Metabolic Syndrome: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys" describes a study of more than 4,700 Korean women aged 19-50 years in which the risk of developing metabolic syndrome or its component disorders was assessed based on life-long duration of breastfeeding, divided into four groups: < 5 months, 6-11 months, 12-23 months, or > 24 months. Coauthors Se Rin Choi, Yong Min Kim, Min Su Cho, So Hyun Kim, and Young Suk Shim, Hallym University, College of Medicine (Seoul, Korea), report the duration of breastfeeding found to be associated with decreased risk of individual components of metabolic syndrome, such as blood pressure, blood glucose, and cholesterol.

Comment: Read more about the benefits of breastfeeding for both mother and child:


Donut

Common food ingredient found to damage the gut lining

The ability of small intestine cells to absorb nutrients and act as a barrier to pathogens is "significantly decreased" after chronic exposure to nanoparticles of titanium dioxide, a common food additive found in everything from chewing gum to bread, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Researchers exposed a small intestinal cell culture model to the physiological equivalent of a meal's worth of titanium oxide nanoparticles—30 nanometers across—over four hours (acute exposure), or three meal's worth over five days (chronic exposure).

Acute exposures did not have much effect, but chronic exposure diminished the absorptive projections on the surface of intestinal cells called microvilli. With fewer microvilli, the intestinal barrier was weakened, metabolism slowed and some nutrients—iron, zinc, and fatty acids, specifically—were more difficult to absorb. Enzyme functions were negatively affected, while inflammation signals increased.

"Titanium oxide is a common food additive and people have been eating a lot of it for a long time—don't worry, it won't kill you!—but we were interested in some of the subtle effects, and we think people should know about them," said Biomedical Engineering Assistant Professor Gretchen Mahler, one of the authors of the paper.

Comment: Avoid titanium dioxide by eating real food, taking high-end supplements and avoiding sunscreen.