Facebook fake profiles

The next time you receive a friend request on Facebook, take a moment to review their information in the ABOUT section. Pay a visit to their FRIENDS list, and see how many friends you have in common. Look in the MORE section and see what their interests are.
Facebook has over 2 billion profiles, but many of them are nothing more than third-world hackers and government snoopers who want to be fake friends with you

Meet Mary Lambert, she lives in North Carolina. Mary just sent me a friend request, and wants to connect with me on Facebook. I get dozens of requests from such people, mostly women, who have profiles that look just like Mary's profile. I always click the DELETE REQUEST button, and then immediately click the MARK AS SPAM button, and Mary Lambert joins the others who have the same kind of profile.

You see, Mary Lambert is not a real person, at least not in the profile I see in front of me. Mary's profile is filled with red flags which identify it as coming from either hackers seeking access to my information, or from surveillance groups like the NSA or the FBI looking to monitor people.

Fake facebook profiles
Somehow, this pathetically easy-to-identify as fake profile is able to escape Facebook's much-touted security algorithms and make its way into my inbox. Obviously, Facebook is not making an serious attempt to prevent fake profiles. So let me give you a quick lesson in how to stop a phony profile on Facebook or any other social media platform.
  • INCOMPLETE OR NON-MATCHING INFORMATION: Mary Lambert's profile says that she is a student and lives in North Carolina. But the school she says she attends is not a school at all but something called the North Carolina High School Athletic Association. Additionally, she says that she went there from "May 2, 2016 to Apr 6, 2020". How is it possible to know your graduation date when it is yet 2 years in the future? This leads me to believe that the page was created by a bot.
  • MARY'S FRIENDS ARE ALL FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES: Yes, I know that Facebook is a global site and that you can have friends from all over the world. I have Facebook friends from Israel, South Africa, Brazil, New Zealand and many other countries. But I have verified that these are real people. The majority of Mary's friends seem to be black muslims from muslim-dominated nations like Tanzania. She appears to have exactly zero friends from North Carolina. Mary and I have no friends in common, which leads to me to wonder why she would want to be friends with me in the first place.
  • FUNKY PHOTOS: Mary only has two photos showing, and one of them is a selfie in the bathroom. Real people probably would not choose to have this be the their main photo to represent them.
FROM NBC NEWS: The Feds are on Facebook. And MySpace, LinkedIn and Twitter, too. U.S. law enforcement agents are following the rest of the Internet world into popular social-networking services, going undercover with false online profiles to communicate with suspects and gather private information, according to an internal Justice Department document that offers a tantalizing glimpse of issues related to privacy and crime-fighting. Think you know who's behind that "friend" request? Think again. Your new "friend" just might be the FBI. The document, obtained in a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit, makes clear that U.S. agents are already logging on surreptitiously to exchange messages with suspects, identify a target's friends or relatives and browse private information such as postings, personal photographs and video clips. READ MORE
The next time you receive a friend request on Facebook, take a moment to review their information in the ABOUT section. Pay a visit to their FRIENDS list, and see how many friends you have in common. Look in the MORE section and see what their interests are. Mary Lambert had exactly no listings of any kind in a section that should have been highly populated with her personal likes and dislikes.

That's because Mary Lambert is not a real person.