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Fri, 23 Feb 2018
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Strange Skies

Question

Massive glowing ball over Siberian sky puzzles locals

glowing light russia
© Sergey Anisimov
The extraordinary scenes were captured by leading Siberian photographer Sergey Anisimov in the town of Salekhard which straddles the Arctic Circle.
Russia has been hit by a wave of reports of a giant UFO in the sky last night with spectacular pictures of an enormous glowing ball illuminating northern Siberia.

Social media erupted with claims of 'aliens arriving' and locals in far flung parts of the country told of 'shivers down their spines'.

While the source of the light has not been confirmed, some have suggested that it was the trace of four rockets launched by the Russian military that caused this extraordinary phenomenon in the night sky.

A similar light was seen in the skies over Norway in December 2009, which was caused by a failed missile. During that incident, the peculiar spiral shaped light pattern was created from reflection of the sun in the leaking fuel.

Vasily Zubkov posted: 'I went out to smoke a cigarette and thought it was the end of the world.'

The extraordinary scenes were captured by leading Siberian photographer Sergey Anisimov in the town of Salekhard which straddles the Arctic Circle.

'I was taken aback for a few minutes, not understanding what was happening,' he said.

Question

Bizarre glowing light seen over Siberia

Aurora borealis
© AP Photo/M. Scott Moon
The aurora borealis, or northern lights, fill the sky early Sunday, March 17, 2013, above the Holy Assumption of the Virgin Mary Russian Orthodox church in Kenai, Alaska. The bright display at times filled the sky.
People in Siberia were stunned Thursday night by a one-in-a-kind spectacle: a huge glowing ball rising up in the sky. What was it? A UFO? A portal to a different dimension?

"I went out to smoke a cigarette and thought it was the end of the world," said Vasiliy Zubkov, according to the Siberian Times.

The website published spectacular photos by Sergey Anisimov, a photographer from the northernmost city of Salekhard.

"'At first I was taken aback for a few minutes, not understanding what was happening," Anisimov told the Times.

"The glowing ball rose from behind the trees and moved in my direction," he explained. "My first thought was of a very powerful searchlight, but the speed [the spectacle] changed everything around changed [my] idea."

Rainbow

Spectacular 'fire rainbow' spotted over nature reserve in Cambridgeshire, UK

Fire rainbow over Wicken Fen, Cambridgeshire
© Glynis Pierson/National Trust
The rare phenomenon captured at Wicken Fen is also known as a ‘sun dog’ or ‘fire rainbow’ .
These amazing photos show a vivid upside-down rainbow above skies at Cambridgeshire's Wicken Fen nature reserve.

The phenomenon, called a circumzenithal arc, is caused by ice crystals refracting the sun's rays.

The rare turn in weather is also known as a 'sun dog' or 'fire rainbow' - and was captured at Wicken Fen by National Trust volunteer Glynis Pierson.

Unlike normal rainbows, which form when light shines through rain, circumzenithal arcs are likely to appear on clear, still days.

Cloud Grey

Rare 'hole-punch clouds' shaped like UFOs seen over Dorset, UK

Residents in Dorset were in for a surprise this week when they spotted what could easily be mistaken for a pair of UFOs

Residents in Dorset were in for a surprise this week when they spotted what could easily be mistaken for a pair of UFOs in the sky. The rare atmospheric phenomenon is a strange cloud formation, known as hole-punch, or fallstreak clouds
Residents in Dorset were in for a surprise this week when they spotted what looked like a pair of UFOs in the sky.

The rare atmospheric phenomenon is a strange cloud formation, known as hole-punch, or fallstreak clouds.

Experts say that the bizarre shapes are caused by aircraft, and are often mistaken for alien craft by confused onlookers.

The spectacular formation appeared in the sky above West Bay, Dorset, on Wednesday afternoon.

Photographer Len Copeland, 55, captured the images after noticing everyone around him was pointing their smartphone cameras toward the sky.

He said: 'People started stopping me and asking what was going on. They assumed I knew something because I was taking photographs, but of course I had no idea.

Info

Ionospheric cold plasma discovered at the magnetopause

Magnetospheric Multiscale
© Southwest Research Institute, CC BY 2.0
Artist’s conception of the four Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft investigating magnetic reconnection at the boundary of Earth’s magnetosphere.
The Sun and Earth both produce powerful magnetic fields, and their intersection creates a complex system of physics that determines the space weather experienced by our planet.

The solar wind-a constant stream of charged particles (plasma) emitted from the Sun-collides with Earth's magnetic field, like water flowing around a rock in a river. The collision of the two magnetic fields produces a phenomenon known as magnetic reconnection, in which the field lines of both the planet and its star snap together following the perturbation. The process releases jets of high-energy plasma, which can produce auroras and disrupt communication systems when they collide with Earth's magnetic field.

Scientists believe that plasma from the magnetosheath-the magnetically weak layer of the magnetosphere where Earth's field contacts the outflowing solar wind-is the dominant driver of magnetic reconnection. However, a new publication by Li et al. shows that "cold" plasma from the planet's ionosphere may play a larger role than previously thought.

Gem

Rare red sprites in action: Mysterious electric tendrils lighting up the sky over Oklahoma filmed

This month, people in Oklahoma have been treated to a stunning and extremely rare display - a red sprite lightning storm

This month, people in Oklahoma have been treated to a stunning and extremely rare display - a red sprite lightning storm
This month, people in Oklahoma have been treated to a stunning and extremely rare display - a red sprite lightning storm.

The extraordinary weather occurrence is caused by electrical bursts of light above highly active thunderstorms, and appears as jellyfish-shaped clusters of red light.

Red sprites are rarely seen, yet one lucky videographer managed to catch the display six times during a storm earlier this month over Edmond, Oklahoma.

On October 6, videographer Paul Smith headed outdoors with his camera to capture some of the lightening forks on film, but instead he managed to capture something far more remarkable.

Sprawled out in the sky intermittently appears a spectacular series of bright red, jellyfish-shaped clusters of light, an extraordinary weather occurrence known as a 'red sprite'.


Bizarro Earth

Supernova theory explains global warming, extinction events, ice ages says engineer

Do Supernova Events Cause Extreme Climate Changes?
"Global warming will not be reduced by reducing man made CO2 emissions" - Dr. William Sokeland
Ice Core Temps
© No Tricks Zone
In recent years, mass die-offs of large animals - like the sudden deaths of 211,000 endangered antelopes within a matter of weeks - have been described as "mysterious" and remain largely unexplained.

Determining the cause of the retreat to ice ages and the abrupt warmings that spawned the interglacial periods has remained controversial for many decades.

Dr. William Sokeland, a heat transfer expert and thermal engineer from the University of Florida, has published a paper in the Journal of Earth Science and Engineering that proposes rapid ice melt events and ice age terminations, extreme weather events leading to mass die-offs, and even modern global warming can be traced to (or at least correlate well with) supernova impact events.

The perspectives and conclusions of researchers who claim to have found strong correlations that could explain such wide-ranging geological phenomena as the causes of glacials/interglacials, modern temperatures, and mysterious large animal die-offs should at least be considered...while maintaining a healthy level of skepticism, of course.

Discovery - if that is potentially what is occurring here - is worth a look.

Bizarro Earth

Sandstorm blocks sun in UK, 50% orange crop losses & rice flooded in USA

Sun shines red at London Bridge
© Alex Glen/Rex/Shutterstock
Behind a veil of dust, the sun shines red at London Bridge.
Hurricane Ophelia somehow has pulled Saharan dust from the western edges of the African continent in a strange N-S wind pattern. The flow is usually from west Africa to eastern coast of N. America. 80mph winds and dust turn day to night, literally where drivers needed to turn on headlights during the day. This is in London and across the UK. 50% of the orange crop in the US is gone, lowest yield since world war two, USA rice crop collapsing, wheat prices up and somehow the main stream media still refuses to discuss the Sun as driving climate on our planet in multi century cycles.


Sun

Dust from Sahara and fires in Portugal turn UK sky an eerie red

Red sun over Cardiff Castle
© Anoup Kerrai
The sky above Cardiff Castle turned orange


Unusual glow comes about as result of Storm Ophelia picking up sands from north Africa and particles from Iberian forest fires


The strange reddish sky reported over parts of the UK may appear to some a sign of impending apocalypse or a celestial Instagram filter, but experts say there is a scientific explanation.

The hue is a remnant of Storm Ophelia dragging in tropical air and dust from the Sahara, while debris from forest fires in Portugal and Spain is also playing a part, according to the BBC weather presenter Simon King.

The dust has caused shorter-wavelength blue light to be scattered, making it appear red. "Ophelia originated in the Azores, where it was a hurricane, and as it tracked its way northwards, it dragged in tropical air from the Sahara," King said.

"The dust gets picked up into the air and goes high up into the atmosphere, and that dust has been dragged high up in the atmosphere above the UK."

The Met Office said the vast majority of the dust was due to forest fires on the Iberian peninsula, which have sent debris into the air. This has been dragged north by Ophelia.

Info

Oral accounts of Aboriginal Australians referenced red giants

Milky Way
© SKA Organisation/Alex Cherney/terrastro.com
View of the Milky Way over one of the Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder antennas, in the Australian outback.
Australian Aborigines probably observed the cyclical changes in the brightness of pulsating red giant stars such as Antares, Betelgeuse, and Aldebaran. They integrated their observations into their oral traditions - cultural narratives that served as a system of laws, social rules, and general knowledge transmission.

European astronomers realized that red giants changed in brightness in 1596, when David Fabricius registered the variability of the star Mira. Johannes Hevelius went on to calculate the amplitude and periodicity of Mira's changes in 1662. But the oral traditions of Australian Aborigines could go much further back in time: they have inhabited the fifth continent for more than 65,000 years. Research examining oral tradition for geological events, such as volcanic eruptions or meteorite impacts, have shown that such oral traditions can survive for thousands of years.

Duane Hamacher (Monash University and University of Southern Queensland, Australia), found new references to variable stars after reinterpreting the accounts of 19th- and 20th-century anthropologists and ethnologists, who recorded some of the Aboriginal oral traditions. His results are being published in a new study in the Australian Journal of Anthropology.

According to Hamacher, anthropologists sometimes misinterpreted Aboriginal accounts in the past, wrongfully assuming them to refer to planets in the solar system rather than stars.

"Many anthropologists had limited training in astronomy, so misidentifications, conflated terminology, and errors were not uncommon," Hamacher says. "Mars and Antares are often mixed up because of their comparable brightness and occasional close proximity."

Hamacher found two oral traditions that referenced the variable stars Betelgeuse, Antares and Aldebaran. Their changes in brightness carried important weight in the narratives and helped encode certain social rules, such as signaling to the tribe when to celebrate initiation rituals.

This is the first clear evidence of indigenous peoples observing and recording stellar variation in oral traditions. The only widely accepted record of a pulsating variable comes from an Egyptian papyrus called the Cairo calendar, which predicted good and bad luck periods throughout the year, dated around 1200 B.C. A statistical analysis of those periods revealed that they followed the variation of the eclipsing binary star Algol.