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Biohazard

Second patient dies from 'novel' coronavirus in China, 1 confirmed case in Japan, fears outbreak may have spread further

wuhan china
A second person has died from the mystery virus in China amid fears the lethal outbreak may spread globally, officials have said.

The 69-year-old man, known only as Xiong, died in the early hours of January 15 at Jinyintan Hospital in Wuhan city.

Officials at Wuhan Municipal Health Commission said the man was admitted to hospital on December 31 with symptoms of the virus.

His health deteriorated on January 4 before he died, local media claims.

A total of 41 patients in Wuhan have been struck with the virus since December. The first death, on January 9, was a man aged 61.

Comment: See also: Mysterious coronavirus identified by China in record time as cause of pneumonia outbreak


Heart

How immersing yourself in nature benefits your health

Nature
© LUISA RIVERA FOR YALE ENVIRONMENT 360
How long does it take to get a dose of nature high enough to make people say they feel healthy and have a strong sense of well-being?

Precisely 120 minutes.

In a study of 20,000 people, a team led by Mathew White of the European Centre for Environment & Human Health at the University of Exeter, found that people who spent two hours a week in green spaces — local parks or other natural environments, either all at once or spaced over several visits — were substantially more likely to report good health and psychological well-being than those who don't. Two hours was a hard boundary: The study, published last June, showed there were no benefits for people who didn't meet that threshold.

The effects were robust, cutting across different occupations, ethnic groups, people from rich and poor areas, and people with chronic illnesses and disabilities.

Cow

Backlash over meat dietary recommendations raises questions about corporate ties to nutrition scientists

meat vs veg
It's almost unheard of for medical journals to get blowback for studies before the data are published. But that's what happened to the Annals of Internal Medicine last fall as editors were about to post several studies showing that the evidence linking red meat consumption with cardiovascular disease and cancer is too weak to recommend that adults eat less of it.

Annals Editor-in-Chief Christine Laine, MD, MPH, saw her inbox flooded with roughly 2000 emails — most bore the same message, apparently generated by a bot — in a half hour. Laine's inbox had to be shut down, she said. Not only was the volume unprecedented in her decade at the helm of the respected journal, the tone of the emails was particularly caustic.

"We've published a lot on firearm injury prevention," Laine said. "The response from the NRA (National Rifle Association) was less vitriolic than the response from the True Health Initiative."

Comment: If you ever needed more evidence that the anti-meat brigade are, at the top echelons, a bunch of crazy people, here it is. That academics, who one would hope would be open to contradictory evidence and opinions in the pursuit of truth, would go into overdrive using such under-handed tactics to censor evidence that runs counter to their position is truly eye-opening. And as pointed out above, the old adage to "follow the money" never fails to bring a blurry picture into focus.

See also:


Attention

Exposure to flame retardants is causing US kids to lose millions of IQ points. They're more damaging than lead or mercury.

flame retardants
The chemicals we've long feared the most — heavy metals like lead and mercury — are less of a threat to kids' developing brains than they were two decades ago. But two new menaces may be taking their place: pesticides and flame retardants.

According to new research from New York University, flame retardants resulted in a loss of 162 million IQ points among children in the US between 2001 and 2016.

The study, published Tuesday in the journal Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology, looked at the four chemicals known to impact the brain of a developing child most: lead, mercury, pesticides, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (otherwise known as flame retardants).

Leo Trasande, a pediatrician and public-health researcher at NYU who co-authored the study, described these pollutants as "hit-and-run" chemicals: Once a child is exposed to them, there's no reversing the damage.

"Kids' brain development is exquisitely vulnerable," Trasande told Business Insider. "If you disrupt, even with subtle effects, the way a child's brain is wired, you can have permanent and lifelong consequences."

Comment: See also:


Health

Some hospitals are ditching lead aprons during X-rays

lead apron
Patients have come to expect a technician to drape their torsos with a heavy lead apron when they get an X-ray, but new thinking among radiologists and medical physicists is upending the decades-old practice of shielding patients from radiation.

Some hospitals are ditching the ritual of covering reproductive organs and fetuses during imaging exams after prominent medical and scientific groups have said it's a feel-good measure that can impair the quality of diagnostic tests and sometimes inadvertently increase a patient's radiation exposure.

The about-face is intended to improve care, but it will require a major effort to reassure regulators, health care workers and the public that it's better not to shield.

Fear of radiation is entrenched in the collective psyche, and many people are surprised to learn that shielding can cause problems. The movement also has yet to gain much traction among dentists, whose offices perform more than half of all X-rays.

Roses

Flu leaves 4-year-old Iowa girl blind

Jade DeLucia
© Nightly News
Doctors fear 4-year-old Jade DeLucia may never see again because of the flu. She was rushed to the hospital on Christmas Eve and developed a swelling of the brain that caused her to lose her vision.
A four-year-old girl in Iowa who didn't get vaccinated this season was left blind after getting the flu — and her parents said doctors don't know if she will ever see again.

Jade DeLucia's mother took her to the hospital on Christmas Eve when her fever became dangerously high.

"I looked down at her and her eyes were in the back of her head," Jade's mom Amanda Phillips told NBC News.

Comment: That they're not-so-subtly implying the unfortunate youngster would have avoided her fate if her parents had vaccinated her is rather telling. Nothing like fear to push an agenda. There is literally no way to know whether an unbelievably rare complication of the flu could have been avoided with the flu shot. Considering complications from the flu shot likely outnumber complications from the flu itself, this seems unlikely. It's even possible that the child's previous flu shot was responsible for complications from the current flu. As previously stated, it's impossible to know.

See also:


Microscope 2

Excess of immune cells, BBB breakdown found in brains of people with autism

brain
© ISTOCK.COM/RUDALL30
An accumulation of T cells and astrocytes in postmortem brain tissue hints at possible autoimmune origins for many cases of autism.
About four years ago, pathologist Matthew Anderson was examining slices of postmortem brain tissue from an individual with autism under a microscope when he noticed something extremely odd: T cells swarming around a narrow space between blood vessels and neural tissue. The cells were somehow getting through the blood-brain barrier, a wall of cells that separates circulating blood from extracellular fluid, neurons, and other cell types in the central nervous system, explains Anderson, who works at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. "I just have seen so many brains that I know that this is not normal."

He soon identified more T-cell swarms, called lymphocytic cuffs, in a few other postmortem brains of people who had been diagnosed with autism. Not long after that, he started to detect another oddity in the brain tissue — tiny bubbles, or blebs. "I'd never seen them in any other brain tissue that I've looked at for many, many different diseases," he says. Anderson began to wonder whether the neurological features he was observing were specific to autism.

Comment: See also:


Arrow Down

Men in name only: New study shows testosterone levels in American males are dropping dramatically. Why would that be?

flowers guy testosterone
© Getty Images / Rachel Thalia Fisher
Pollution, sedentary lifestyles, soy and even social 'feminization' have been blamed for a deepening testosterone crisis. But finding the answer fast is important - the future of America's population literally depends on it.

Alarming discoveries

Testosterone truly is the male hormone. It is what turns boys into men — upon puberty the testes drastically upregulate their production of it, triggering secondary sexual characteristics. These include the growth of muscle and bone, a deeper voice and the sprouting of body hair. Without testosterone, one suspects there would be a lot of noodle-armed, squeaky-voiced man-babies stalking the streets, perhaps in the vein of a Michael Jackson (rumoured to have been on hormone-blockers since childhood) or even a young Jeff Bezos (until he allegedly started pumping himself full of replacement testosterone).

Comment: See also:


Biohazard

Treating mercury toxicity with emeramide

mercury
Boyd Haley, Ph.D., is a chemist specializing in the development of chemicals to chelate toxic metals, both from the environment and the human body. I had the opportunity to interview Haley (below) at the 2018 Academy of Comprehensive Integrative Medicine (ACIM) conference in Orlando.

Haley has a Ph.D. in chemistry and biochemistry and conducted research funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for 25 years at the University of Wyoming and at the University of Kentucky. Early in his career, he developed a biochemical detection system called nucleotide photoaffinity labeling and has published studies on its usage.1 Haley explains:
I took ATP and made it radioactive, which isn't a big feat. But then I attached to that a molecule that would explode when it hit a photon of light. When it exploded, it made a very reactive intermediate that had a half-life of something like 10-12 or 10-13 seconds.

Comment: See also:


SOTT Logo Radio

Objective:Health - Breast is Best! Mother's Milk Much More Than Just a Meal

O:H header
The human body, when looked at in enough detail, is truly miraculous. A study in 2009 found that human breast milk actually varies its composition throughout the day, sending circadian signals to the infant to help regulate its biology appropriately.

Among many different nutritional factors, the milk varied in composition by providing more cortisol in the daytime and more melatonin at night. Another study has found that, when the baby is ill, the mother's breast milk provides more immune factors to help the infant body to fight off the infection.

Such amazing findings have wide-ranging implications (not the least of which questions the value of infant formula in providing all the 'nutrition', or more accurately information, the baby needs).

Join us on this episode of Objective:Health as we explore the amazing benefits of breast feeding.


And check us out on Brighteon!


For other health-related news and more, you can find us on:
♥Twitter: https://twitter.com/objecthealth
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♥Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/channel/objectivehealth

And you can check out all of our previous shows (pre YouTube) here.

Running Time: 00:32:08

Download: MP3 — 28.9 MB