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From Russell and Hilbert to Wiener and Harari: The Disturbing Origins of Cybernetics and Transhumanism

Norbert Wiener image
© norbertwiener.org/KJN
US Mathematician/Cybernetician Norbert Wiener
The more we are encouraged to think like cold computers, the more the thesis that "computers must replace human thought" could be maintained.

As I outlined in my previous article on the Clash of the Two Systems, the end of the 19th century saw a major clash between two opposing paradigms of political economy which has largely been scrubbed out of history books.

Just like today, the two opposing systems were characterized on the one hand, by a demand for centralized control of the world by a unipolar elite yearning to stand above the influence of sovereign nation states like modern gods of Olympus, while the other was premised on a "multipolar" design of a community of sovereign nation states working together on large scale infrastructure and technological progress. One was premised on closed system Malthusian economic standards of adapting to diminishing returns while the other was founded upon standards of ongoing scientific progress generating creative leaps out of the constraints of limited resource baskets.

Today I would like to continue to trace the roots of those poisonous ideas which characterize today's unipolar paradigm which masquerades behind a billionaire-authored "Great Reset" of world civilization. In this reset, we are told by the likes of Klaus Schwab that a "Fourth Industrial Revolution" will usher in not only vast automation and Artificial Intelligence operations at every level of society, but also a merging of humanity with machines. Figures like Elon Musk and Google's Ray Kurzweil assert this merging is needed in order to "stay relevant" in the next phase of our evolution. Davos-man Yuval Harari echoed that the levers of evolution will now be moved from the randomness of nature into the new gods running Google, Facebook and the WEF.

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Light Sabers

Eugenics, The Fourth Industrial Revolution and the Clash of Two Systems

Galton
© Wikimedia Commons/KJN
Matt Ehret explains what caused the rise of the perversion of science known as "eugenics" as a new scientific religion in the 19th century.

Today's world is gripped between two possible futures: on the one hand, a multipolar alliance in defense of sovereign nation states has organized itself around a paradigm of long-term thinking, scientific optimism and win-win cooperation, while a unipolar paradigm of world government, depopulation and zero-sum thinking pushes a program of Great Resets, controlled pandemics and war.

Gaining insight into these two opposing paradigms is more important now than ever before, and one important place to start is the disturbing mind of Great Reset Architects who are today pushing society into a "Fourth Industrial Revolution" where it is believed that automation, and Artificial Intelligence will render most of humanity obsolete. As the World Economic Forum's star philosopher Yuval Harari has repeatedly described this outlook:
"Technology may disrupt human society and the very meaning of human life in numerous ways ranging from the creation of a global useless class to the rise of data colonialism and digital dictatorships."
In the first article in this series, I reviewed the re-organization of the eugenics movement after WW2 as it followed Sir Julian Huxley's demand that "the unthinkable be made, once again thinkable".

In this second segment, we will leap back a little further in time to better understand what caused the rise of the perversion of science known as "eugenics" as a new scientific religion in the 19th century, before continuing with part three (From Russell to Wiener: The Rise of Cybernetics and Transhumanism).

Comet 2

Citizen science, the cosmos and the meaning of life: How the comet that may destroy us offers the most transcendent celestial spectacle

Solar system quilt
© Ellen Harding Baker
19th-century Solar System quilt featuring a comet, designed and embroidered by Ellen Harding Baker over the course of seven years to teach women astronomy when they were barred from higher education in science.
Encounters with the beautiful and the sublime in the science of "the single most dangerous object known to humanity."

On July 13, 1862, while a young experiment in democracy was being ripped asunder by its first Civil War, The Springfield Republican reported a strange and wondrous celestial sighting in the undivided sky, as bright as Polaris. Within days, two astronomers — Lewis Swift and Horace Parnell Tuttle — independently observed the phenomenon and determined it to be a colossal comet. Comet Swift-Tuttle — the largest Solar System object to periodically pass near Earth — is now known to return every 133 years, dragging in its long wake a dazzling annual gift: Each summer, as our lonely planet crosses the orbit of Swift-Tuttle and the debris shed by the icy colossus burn up in our atmosphere, the Perseid meteor shower streaks across the common sky, washing the whole of humanity with wonder.

Bizarro Earth

New analysis of ancient grave site concludes climate change likely contributed to one of the oldest examples of human warfare

Jebel Sahaba graveyard sudan egypt climate change violence
© Wendorf Archives of the British Museum.
Two of the individuals found buried at Jebel Sahaba in the Nile Valley in the 1960s are shown. Pencils mark the position of associated stone artifacts. Image courtesy of the Wendorf Archives of the British Museum.
One of the oldest known war cemeteries, discovered in the Nile River Valley, did not necessarily originate from a single epic battle like we once thought.

According to a full reanalysis of this ancient burial site, known as Jebel Sahaba, the humans buried here were probably subject to a series of violent skirmishes rather than one single, tragic onslaught. If so, the researchers suggest a coveted spot in a landscape ravaged by climate change could be the cause.

Reexamining the bones of 61 individuals from the site, researchers have found over a hundred new signs of injury, many of which were not fatal.

A quarter of the skeletons were found with both healed and unhealed wounds, which suggests this group of hunter-gatherers experienced brutal episodes of violence more than once in their lives.

X

Eisenhower rejected military chiefs' demand for nuclear war on China, classified account of '58 Taiwan Strait crisis reveals

US Navy Plane and ship
© Unknown
US Navy • Taiwan Strait • 1958
A previously censored account of the 1958 Taiwan Strait crisis that was sponsored by the Pentagon has been published in full by the leaker of the Pentagon Papers, Daniel Ellsberg. The report provides a hair-raising portrait of a reckless US military leadership relentlessly pressing President Dwight Eisenhower for the authority to carry out nuclear attacks on communist China.

After holding the still-classified version of the account in his possession for fifty years, Ellsberg said he decided to release it because of the growing threat of US war with China over Taiwan, and the danger that such a conflict could escalate into a nuclear exchange.

A May 22 New York Times report on the account offered only general details of the role the US Joint Chiefs of Staff played in the run-up to the 1958 Taiwan crisis. However, it is now clear from the original highly classified documents as well as other evidence now available that from the beginning, the Joint Chiefs aimed first and foremost to exploit the tensions to carry out nuclear strikes against Chinese nuclear military targets deep in highly-populated areas.

Chiang Kai-shek's nationalist Kuomintang regime and the Joint Chiefs were allies in wanting to embroil the United States in a war with China.

Evil Rays

How The Unthinkable Became Thinkable: Eric Lander, Julian Huxley And The Awakening of Sleeping Monsters

sleeping monsters
Will we see biotechnology serve the interests of humanity under a multipolar paradigm that cherishes national sovereignty, human life, family, and faith?

As much as it might cause us a fair deal of displeasure and even an upset stomach to consider such ideas as the hold eugenics has on our presently troubled era, I believe that ignoring such a topic really does no one any favors in the long run.

This is especially serious, as leading World Economic Forum darlings like Yuval Harari flaunt such concepts as "the new global useless class" which Artificial intelligence, genetic engineering, automation and the Fourth Industrial Revolution is supposedly ushering in. Other Davos creatures like Klaus Schwab call openly for a microchipped global citizenry capable of interfacing with a global web with a single thought while Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg promote 'neuralinks' to "keep humanity relevant" by merging with computers in a new epoch of evolutionary biology.

Leading Darwinian geneticists like Sir James Watson and Sir Richard Dawkins openly defend eugenics while a technocracy consolidates itself in a governing station using a "Great Reset" as an excuse to usher in a new post-nation state era.

Hiliter

Oldest known tattoo tools found at an ancient Tennessee site

tattoo turkey bone
© A. Deter-Wolf, T.M. Peres and S. Karacic/Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports 2021
Two previously unearthed turkey leg bones with sharpened tips (top) are the oldest known tattooing tools. Two other turkey bones from the same site (bottom) may also have been used for tattooing but lack tips for analysis.
Ancient tattooing tools are tough to find or even recognize as implements for creating skin designs. But new microscopic studies of two turkey leg bones with sharpened ends indicate that Native Americans used these items to make tattoos between around 5,520 and 3,620 years ago.

These pigment-stained bones are the world's oldest known tattooing tools, say archaeologist Aaron Deter-Wolf of the Tennessee Division of Archaeology in Nashville and his colleagues. The find suggests that Native American tattoo traditions in eastern North America extend back more than a millennium earlier than previously thought (SN: 3/4/19). Ötzi the Iceman, who lived around 5,250 years ago in Europe, displays the oldest known tattoos (SN: 1/13/16), but researchers haven't found any of the tools used to make the Iceman's tattoos.

Comment: See also: And check out SOTT radio's:


Info

Archaeologists identify 4,000-year-old war memorial in Syria

Tell Banat North in Syria was submerged in 1999.
© New Scientist
Tell Banat North in Syria was submerged in 1999.
An earthen mound in what is now Syria may be the oldest known war memorial in the world, constructed before 2300 BC. The remains of foot soldiers and charioteers were buried in distinct clusters in a monument made of piled-up soil. However, it is not clear if they belonged to the winning or losing side, or what the conflict was about.

The finding comes from a re-examination of remains from the White Monument, which was excavated in the 1980s and 1990s. The area was submerged in 1999 by the construction of the Tishrin Dam on the Euphrates River, and has not been investigated since.

Anne Porter of the University of Toronto in Canada was one of the leaders of the excavations. "It was a salvage project," she says. The flooding was "a really traumatic experience" because the area was "the most fabulous site you could imagine working on".

Immediately to the north of a small mountain called Jebel Bazi, Mesopotamian people built a settlement that archaeologists call the Banat/Bazi complex. It was occupied between about 2700 and 2300 BC. The site included a set of earthen mounds called Tell Banat, and slightly further north a single large mound called Tell Banat North or the White Monument.

The White Monument got its name because it was coated in a chalky mineral called gypsum. Porter says it was built in three stages. The first was a smooth mound, which the team never managed to excavate due to the flooding. Later, people built smaller mounds on top of it, containing human bones. "Imagine upside-down ice cream cones on the outside of a pudding," says Porter. "That's what it must have looked like."

Blue Planet

Largest images ever made by humans found in India

Boha
© C & Y Oetheimer, Archaeological Research in Asia, 2021
Boha 3's meandering lines.
Hidden in the vast, arid expanses of India's Thar Desert lie mysterious old drawings carved into the land.

These newly discovered designs are of such immense scale, they were likely never able to be glimpsed in their entirety by those who made them, researchers say.

The huge motifs are examples of geoglyphs - giant hand-made depictions and patterns built upon or carved into the land, often occupying such scope that the true appearance of their forms can only be appreciated from far above.

Amongst all known geoglyphs of historical relevance - including the famous Nazca Lines of Peru - the Thar Desert formations appear to stand alone, however, representing what may actually be the largest-ever graphical depictions designed by humans.

Comment: See also: Also check out SOTT radio's: MindMatters: America Before: Comets, Catastrophes, Mounds and Mythology


Info

Ancient Chinese kingdom pits filled with artifacts shed light on rituals

Excavation Site
© VCG via Getty Images
Archaeologists excavate one of the six newly discovered pits at the site of Sanxingdui in China.
Archaeologists have discovered six sacrificial pits containing about 500 artifacts, including gold and bronze masks, in the ancient Chinese city of Sanxingdui, according to news reports.

The site is located about 930 miles (1,500 kilometers) southwest of Beijing, Xinhua, China's state-run press agency, reported.

The artifacts date back around 3,000 years, to a time when the ancient kingdom of Shu ruled this part of China. In addition to the masks, the archaeologists uncovered bronze artifacts with dragon and cow engravings, miniature ivory sculptures, silk, carbonized rice (rice that has turned into carbon) and tree seeds, Xinhua reported.

"Surprisingly, we have unearthed some never-heard-of-before bronze ware items," Lei Yu, an archaeologist with the Sichuan Provincial Cultural Relics and Archaeology Research Institute, told Xinhua. "For instance, some large and delicate bronze ware items have bizarre-looking dragon or cow designs on them."

The researchers haven't turned up any human remains in the pits, and they don't know what function the pits may have served.

Even so, the discovery of the six pits may provide clues about the rituals the people of the Shu kingdom practiced at that time.