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New Karahantepe settlement 'may be older than Göbeklitepe'

Karahantepe
© DHA
Archaeologists work at the historical site of Karahantepe, Şanlıurfa, southeastern Turkey, Nov. 27, 2020.
Excavation work at settlements in the archaeological site of Karahantepe, located in Turkey's southeastern Şanlıurfa province, continues diligently. According to the latest data from the archaeological teams at the site, a new settlement that may be older than the prehistoric site of Göbeklitepe - which is crowned the world's first temple and "zero point" of history - will be unearthed soon.

The surface survey works at Karahantepe, which is an alternative site nearby for tourists visiting Göbeklitepe, started in 1997. As part of the search, some T-shaped obelisks were detected that resembled the ones bearing wild animal figures in Göbeklitepe. Following the discovery, the first excavations in the region started with permission obtained from the Ministry of Culture and Tourism's General Directorate of Cultural Heritage and Museums. The excavations have uncovered 250 obelisks featuring animal figures to date.

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Chess

The art of political lying

Queen Anne
© historic-UK.com
Queen Anne
With idle tales this fills our empty ears;
The next reports what from the first he hears;
The rolling fictions grow in strength and size,
Each author adding to the former lies.
Here vain credulity, with new desires,
Leads us astray, and groundless joy inspires;
The dubious whispers, tumults fresh designed,
And chilling fears astound the anxious mind.

-Ovid's Metamorphosis
While the foundations of the USA tremble under the force of unprecedented vote fraud, color revolutionary operations, and the danger of a renewed fascist takeover of the Wall Street-Big Tech-NSA/FBI/CIA combine, certain facts must be separated from fiction.
  • Despite the mainstream media announcements of Biden's victory, the fact is that things are far from certain as President Trump has made the point that he will fight all cases of blatant vote fraud which have appeared across 8 states.
  • Despite mainstream media assertions to the contrary, there are indeed growing mountains of evidence that vote fraud has occurred among democrat-controlled swing states which have either given tens of thousands of Trump votes to Biden via "glitches", blocked republican observers, used rosters replete with dead voters, modified dates on ballots or hundreds of thousands of mystery ballots appearing out of thin air in the middle of the night tipping the scales for Biden.
  • Every opposing narrative to this political lie is being surgically shut down, such as the immense censoring of the President's Twitter account and cancelling of the "Stop the Steal" Facebook group that garnered over 350 000 members in only 24 hours. Meanwhile MSNBC, CBS, NPR and NBC have decided to take the unprecedented action of censoring the President's press conference of Nov. 5 which raised serious questions about the legitimacy of the fraudulent votes.
While more cases of fraud can be listed here, and here, and here, and here, and here, the political situation is so tumultuous that I think it is important to take another approach to the historic moment we are currently living through by reviewing a parallel moment of great potential which was squandered three centuries ago.

Info

Ancient blanket made from turkey feathers

Fiber Cord and Turkey Feathers
© WSU Department of Anthropology
A segment of fiber cord that has been wrapped with turkey feathers, along with a single downy feather.
Pullman, Washington — The ancient inhabitants of the American Southwest used around 11,500 feathers to make a turkey feather blanket, according to a new paper in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports. The people who made such blankets were ancestors of present-day Pueblo Indians such as the Hopi, Zuni and Rio Grande Pueblos.

A team led by Washington State University archaeologists analyzed an approximately 800-year-old, 99 x 108 cm (about 39 x 42.5 inches) turkey feather blanket from southeastern Utah to get a better idea of how it was made. Their work revealed thousands of downy body feathers were wrapped around 180 meters (nearly 200 yards) of yucca fiber cord to make the blanket, which is currently on display at the Edge of the Cedars State Park Museum in Blanding, Utah.

The researchers also counted body feathers from the pelts of wild turkeys purchased from ethically and legally compliant dealers in Idaho to get an estimate of how many turkeys would have been needed to provide feathers for the blanket. Their efforts show it would have taken feathers from between four to 10 turkeys to make the blanket, depending on the length of feathers selected.

"Blankets or robes made with turkey feathers as the insulating medium were widely used by Ancestral Pueblo people in what is now the Upland Southwest, but little is known about how they were made because so few such textiles have survived due to their perishable nature," said Bill Lipe, emeritus professor of anthropology at WSU and lead author of the paper. "The goal of this study was to shed new light on the production of turkey feather blankets and explore the economic and cultural aspects of raising turkeys to supply the feathers."

Colosseum

Barbegal water mills: Unique hydraulics of 'world's earliest known industrial plant' revealed

Barbegal

View of the ruins of the Barbegal mill complex in 2018. Credit: Robert Fabre, Saint Etienne du Grès, France
The Barbegal watermills in southern France are a unique complex dating back to the second century AD. The construction and its 16 waterwheels represent the first attempt in Europe to build a machine complex on an industrial scale. The complex was created when the Roman Empire was at the height of its power. However, little is known about technological advances, particularly in the field of hydraulics and the spread of knowledge at the time. A team of scientists led by Professor Cees Passchier from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has now gained new knowledge about the construction and principle of the water supply to the mills in Barbegal. The research results were published in Scientific Reports.

Comment: There have been numerous discoveries that reveal how cultures of the past had much more advanced knowledge and technology than is commonly assumed - some that would rival even that of our own time: Also check out SOTT radio's: MindMatters: The Holy Grail, Comets, Earth Changes and Randall Carlson


Nebula

Californian cave artists may have used hallucinogens

rock art
© Devlin Gandy
The rock art that researchers believe may represent the pinwheel-shaped Datura flower
With recurring zigzags, spirals, and other simple geometric patterns, ancient rock art is sometimes surprisingly similar across the globe. One hypothesis is that the artists were all using psychoactive compounds, which nudged the brain toward certain patterns. Now, a new find from a roughly 500-year-old cave used by Native Americans suggests such compounds may indeed have been an important component of their rock art. But the art itself may not have depicted the experience of tripping.

"They have broken away from the ludicrous school of thought ... which saw all rock art as trance imagery produced by shamans," says Paul Bahn, an archaeologist at Archaeological Institute of America who was not involved in the research.

Comment: The findings in this cave are not necessarily reflective of practices throughout the world and history, because it is known that shamans, as individuals, were revered for their ability to reach ecstatic states without hallucinogens, and it's likely that the reliance on them only became a necessity later when the knowledge and ability to do so otherwise was lost: Also check out SOTT radio's:


USA

John F. Kennedy and America's lost patriotic heritage

JFKennedy
© The Kennedy Center
President John F. Kennedy
"Man holds in his mortal hands the power to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life. And yet the same revolutionary beliefs for which our forebears fought are still at issue around the globe...."
President Kennedy, 1961 Inaugural Address
Where China and Russia are currently leading a new paradigm of cooperation and development around a multipolar alliance, it is too easily forgotten that America itself had once embodied this anti-colonial spirit under the foreign policy vision of John F. Kennedy. Even though the young leader died in office before the full effect of his grand vision could take hold, it is worth revisiting his fight and stated intention for a post-colonial world governed by win-win cooperation. This exercise is especially important now that we are coming to the anniversary of the murder of John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963.

FDR's Death and the Emergence of the New Rome

America didn't become an imperial "dumb giant" after WWII without a major fight.

With FDR's death, the USA began acting more and more like an empire abroad and a racist police state under McCarthyism within its own borders. During this time, those allies of FDR who were committed to Roosevelt's anti colonial post war vision, rallied around former Vice President Henry Wallace's 1948 Presidential bid with the Progressive Party of America. When this effort failed, an outright police state took over and those same fascists who had sponsored WWII took control of the reins of power.

Dig

Pompeii dig reveals almost perfect remains of a 'master and his slave'

pompeii
© Luigi Spina/Parco Archeologico/EPA
The bodies were found during excavations at a villa in the outskirts of the ancient city.
The almost perfectly preserved remains of two men have been unearthed in an extraordinary discovery in the ancient Roman city of Pompeii.

The bodies of what are thought to be a wealthy man and his slave, believed to have died as they were fleeing the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD79, were found during excavations at a villa in the outskirts of the city, Pompeii archaeological park officials said yesterday.

Massimo Osanna, the park's director, said the find was "truly exceptional", while culture minister Dario Franceschini said it underlined the importance of Pompeii as a place for study and research.

Comment: See also:


Wine

Joe Wilson, ambassador who opposed the Iraq War, dead at 69

Wilson and Plame
© Getty Images
Former Ambassador Joe Wilson with then wife and former CIA operative Valerie Plame
Former Ambassador Joe Wilson — who found himself and his then-wife Valerie Plame in the middle of a political firestorm when he contradicted President George W. Bush's rationale for the 2003 invasion of Iraq — has died at the age of 69.

Plame, a former CIA operative who was outed in apparent revenge after Wilson blew the whistle on Bush, said the cause was organ failure. Wilson and Plame ended their marriage in 2017.

A veteran, 23-year diplomat, Wilson had been assigned by the CIA as a private citizen to go to Niger in 2003 and investigate reports that Iraq had been sold uranium yellowcake by the African country in the 1990s. Wilson found nothing — and said as much in a New York Times op-ed headlined, "What I Didn't Find in Africa" in July 2003. He wrote in the column:
"If my information was deemed inaccurate, I understand (though I would be very interested to know why). If, however, the information was ignored because it did not fit certain preconceptions about Iraq, then a legitimate argument can be made that we went to war under false pretenses."
Wilson's words contradicted Bush's contention in his January 2003 State of the Union that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction.

Info

Adapt 2030: Underwater cities mean ancient historical timelines are incorrect

Underwater settlements
© YouTube/Adapt 2030 (screen capture)
Submerged prehistoric settlements in both the Black and Mediterranean seas show that these areas were above water 6000 years prior, but sea levels shown at the time by classic academia are off by 1000 years. Additionally erosion patterns at the Kailash Temple complex in India indicate a far older monolithic structure than academia will allow. Out of time artefact where ever we look.


Comment: Submerged 6,000-year-old prehistoric settlement reveals Black Sea level was 5 meters lower


Microscope 2

Iron Age man with first known case of TB in Britain was migrant from continental Europe

skeleton
© University of Southampton
The skeleton of the man was discovered during archaeological excavations at Tarrant Hinton,
North Dorset, between 1967 and 1985
A new study of the skeleton of an Iron Age man with the first known case of tuberculosis in Britain has shed new light on his origins.

Archaeological excavations at Tarrant Hinton, Dorset, between 1967 and 1985 uncovered a variety of evidence for settlement between the Iron Age and the Roman period. Possibly the most significant discovery was the skeleton of an Iron Age man whose spine displayed signs of tuberculosis (TB). The man, who died between 400 and 230 BC, is in fact the earliest case of TB ever found in Britain.

In a new study, chemical analysis of the man's bones and teeth, carried out by the University of Southampton for the Museum of East Dorset, has finally answered some key questions about his origins. The results show that the man arrived in Dorset as a child, around the age of eight. His family came from an area of Carboniferous Limestone outside Britain, somewhere to the south or west. The skeleton is now on permanent display at the newly-refurbished Museum of East Dorset in Wimborne (currently closed due to COVID-19 restrictions).

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