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Wed, 23 May 2018
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Earthquakes

Seismograph

Magnitude 6.8 earthquake hits Bolivia

quake
A powerful 6.8-magnitude earthquake struck Bolivia on Monday, but it was so deep that there were no reports of injuries or damage.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake struck at 10:40 a.m. local time (9:40 a.m. EDT; 1340 GMT) and it was centered 205 miles (127 kilometers) southeast of Tarija, Bolivia. The epicenter was 346 miles (557 kilometers) below the surface.

The San Calixto Observatory in La Paz said that it is one of the most powerful quakes on record in Bolivia, but that there was no damage because it was so deep.

Seismograph

Magnitude 6.1 earthquake hits south of the Fiji Islands

quake
An earthquake measuring 6.1 on the Richter scale jolted South of the Fiji Islands on Monday, the US Geological Survey (USGS) said.

An earthquake measuring 6.1 on the Richter scale jolted South of the Fiji Islands on Monday, the US Geological Survey (USGS) said.

The epicenter, with a depth of 83.52 km, was initially determined to be at 24.8965 degrees south latitude and 176.6055 degrees west longitude.

Seismograph

Massive 6.9 magnitude earthquake strikes off the coast of Papua New Guinea

A 6.9 magnitude earthquake hit off the coast of Papua New Guinea on Friday morning, sending people running out of buildings and triggering a tsunami warning

A 6.9 magnitude earthquake hit off the coast of Papua New Guinea on Friday morning, sending people running out of buildings and triggering a tsunami warning
A 6.9 magnitude earthquake has struck off the coast of Papua New Guinea, triggering a tsunami warning for nearby coastlines.

The quake struck at a depth of 10km, about 162 kilometres from the town of Rabaul on New Britain Island, about 7.25am on Friday.

There have been no immediate reports of damage or casualties, though one hotel worker told Reuters her guests ran out of the building in fright.

The tsunami warning was later called off.

Little more than a month ago, the country suffered a lethal 7.5 magnitude earthquake.

Seismograph

Scientists: The bigger the earthquake, the longer it takes to issue an alert

Bigger earthquake alerts
© Science
Earthquake early warning systems can give people crucial seconds to move to safety-but only if they send the message in time. Now, scientists working on such systems have discovered that the bigger the tremor, the longer it takes to issue an alert-giving people little time to prepare for the big one, but lots of time to brace for a ho-hum event.

All earthquakes start with P waves, which are fast moving and cause little damage. S waves come next, moving more slowly but causing more destruction. Early warning systems measure ground movement during the fast P waves to predict how much shaking the S waves will cause, and then send out an alert.

Seismograph

Earthquake swarm hits North Iceland

Iceland earthquake swarm
© Skjáskot/Veðurstofa Íslands
The earthquakes this morning with the largest shown as a green star on the map.
Almost thirty earthquakes occurred in North Iceland and the ocean north of Iceland last night. The largest earthquake of the swarm occured at 2.30 AM at a magnitude of 3.0. Its origins were around 20 km North East of Siglufjörður.

The swarm began at around 00.30 last night and most of them were at a magnitude of between 1.0 and 2.0. An earthquake of 2.8 occurred North East of Grímsey.

The Iceland Met Office sees no cause for concern but is carefully monitoring events.

Comment: Some other seismic activity from around the world this week includes: See also: Scientists predict upsurge in major earthquakes for 2018 due to slowdown in Earth's rotation


Seismograph

Powerful shallow earthquake of magnitude 6.6 hits off Papua New Guinea

The earthquake struck 180 km west of the town of Rabaul, on New Britain island, at a shallow depth of 10 km, the USGS said.
© USGS
The earthquake struck 180 km west of the town of Rabaul, on New Britain island, at a shallow depth of 10 km, the USGS said.
A shallow 6.6 magnitude earthquake struck off Papua New Guinea on Monday (March 26), the US Geological Survey said, the latest in a series to hit the region in recent days, but there were no immediate reports of casualties or damage.

The quake struck 180km west of the town of Rabaul, on New Britain island, at a depth of 10 km, the USGS said. The quake was initially recorded with a magnitude of 7.0 but was later downgraded. There was no immediate tsunami warning.

"We are okay. No one is injured," said Sylvia Ombul, night desk supervisor at the Kimbe Bay Hotel in the port town of Kimbe, about 140 km to the west of the quake.

Comment: Just 2 days ago: 6.3-magnitude earthquake strikes Papua New Guinea region


Seismograph

Powerful 6.5 earthquake in the Banda Sea

LOCATION
Date & time: Sun, 25 Mar 20:14:48 UTC

Magnitude: 6.5

Depth: 181.0 km

Epicenter latitude / longitude: 6.7°S / 129.72°E [Map]

Nearest volcano: Nila (31 km)

Primary data source: GFZ

Seismograph

Shallow 6.3-magnitude quake strikes Southeast Indian Ridge

graph
An earthquake measuring 6.3 on the Richter scale jolted Southeast Indian Ridge at 19:58:33 GMT on Saturday, the U.S. Geological Survey said.

The epicenter, with a depth of 10.0 km, was initially determined to be at 45.8299 degrees south latitude and 96.099 degrees east longitude.

Seismograph

6.3-magnitude earthquake strikes Papua New Guinea region

The epicentre of the quake was located 180km south-west of Rabaul on New Britain island, some 900km north-east of the capital Port Moresby, at a depth of 68km.
© USGS
The epicentre of the quake was located 180km south-west of Rabaul on New Britain island, some 900km north-east of the capital Port Moresby, at a depth of 68km
A 6.3-magnitude earthquake struck off the north-east coast of an island of the Pacific Ocean nation of Papua New Guinea on Saturday (March 24), officials said, but the tremor posed no tsunami threat to the region.

There were no immediate reports of damage or casualties from the quake, which was centred in a much more remote region than a magnitude-7.5 tremor that rocked the country's mountainous mainland highlands on Feb 26, killing 100 people.

The epicentre of Saturday's quake was located 180km south-west of Rabaul on New Britain island, some 900km north-east of the capital Port Moresby, at a depth of 68km, the US Geological Survey (USGS) said.

The quake was revised down from an initial reading of magnitude 6.8 and a depth of 60km.

Stock Down

Lloyd's of London reports £2bn loss after natural disasters in 2017

Hurricane Irma damage
© Chris Wattie/Reuters
Local residents look inside a collapsed coastal house in the wake of Hurricane Irma in Vilano Beach, Florida.
Lloyd's of London reported a £2bn loss after a year of natural disasters

Lloyd's of London has posted its first loss in six years, after what the insurer described as "one of the costliest years for natural catastrophes in the past decade".

The iconic insurance market reported an overall pre-tax loss of £2bn for last year, down from a profit of £2.1bn the year before, despite gross written premiums climbing to £33.6bn from £29.9bn.

Major claims in 2017 were more than double the cost of the previous year, at £4.5bn, which led to an underwriting loss of £3.4bn, compared with profit of £500m in 2016.

This led the group's combined ratio to deteriorate to 114 per cent from 97.9 per cent - a combined ratio of less than 100 per cent means a firm is profitable.

A series of huge storms in the second half of 2017, including Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, left homes and businesses across the south coast of the US and the Caribbean destroyed.

Earthquakes in Mexico and wildfires in California added to the financial losses due to natural disasters, with one study putting the total cost of global disasters last year at $306bn (£218bn).

Comment: The costs of natural disasters are likely to increase in the coming years. See also: World sees rapid upsurge in extreme weather says report