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6.0 magnitude earthquake in South Sandwich Islands region

Earthquake
© AFP 2021 / FREDERICK FLORIN
6.0 magnitude earthquake

UTC time: Thursday, August 12, 2021 19:43 PM

Your time: Thursday, August 12, 2021, 8:43 PM GMT+1

Magnitude Type: mb

USGS page: M 6.0 - South Sandwich Islands region

USGS status: Reviewed by a seismologist

Reports from the public: 0 people

Seismograph

Major magnitude 7.5 earthquake - South Sandwich Islands Region

MAPPED
Major magnitude 7.5 earthquake at 63 km depth

Local time at epicenter: Thursday, 12 Aug 2021 4:32 pm (GMT -2)

Magnitude: 7.5

Depth: 63.3 km

Epicenter latitude / longitude: 57.5959°S / 25.1874°W (South Atlantic Ocean, South Georgia & South Sandwich Islands)

Nearest volcano: Michael (107 km / 66 mi)

Bizarro Earth

Powerful magnitude 7.1 earthquake rattles Philippines

Earthquake
© AFP 2021 / FREDERICK FLORIN
Sitting off the ring of fire, the Philippines is no stranger to seismic activity. One of the most disastrous earthquakes that shook the nation took place in 2012 after a magnitude 6.7 unfolded and led to the deaths of dozens of individuals and prompted injuries to over a hundred others. Many are still considered missing.

A massive magnitude 7.1 earthquake struck the Philippines early Thursday, according to readings by the United States Geological Service.

Although the US agency initially issued a tsunami warning for the archipelagic country and nearby Indonesia, the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology has since stated that there is no longer a tsunami threat to the Philippines.

Details released by the USGS indicate that the quake struck at a depth of 50 kilometers at a distance of just 66 kilometers southeast of Bobon, Philippines. Initial readings of the the quake came in at a magnitude 6.1 and later upgraded to a magnitude 7.2 quake, before being downgraded to 7.1.
Philippines Earthquake
© USGS

Blue Planet

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Downfall of civilization triggers

Histomap
© YouTube/Adapt 2030 (screen capture)
The Histomap of the last 4000 years of world history published in 1931 shows all of the major Grand Solar Minimums with contractions of empires and kingdoms through history. Its simple, inadequate food supplies equal civilization crumbling. There are several unnamed GSM's in the 4000 years as well. 2024 brings the next global contraction in food supplies.


Comment: See also:


Attention

1,000+ earthquakes rattle Yellowstone in July - the most in a single month since 2017

Yellowstone

Yellowstone National Park sits in the northwest region of Wyoming and is home to bursting geysers, steam vents and bubbling pools. At 3,472 square miles, the park is larger than the states of Rhode Island and Delaware combined
A swarm of more than 1,000 earthquakes ripped through Yellowstone National Park in July, which officials are calling a 'doozy' of a month.

This was the most seismic activity in the region since the Maple Creek swarm of more than 1,100 quakes shook the park in June 2017.

Although some may fear this increase in activity may mean 'the big one [earthquake] is near,' the US Geological Survey (USGS) says the earthquakes were not caused by magma, but rather groundwater moving through pre-existing faults.


Comment: Is this an attempt to be reassuring?


The University of Utah Seismograph Stations, responsible for the operation and analysis of the Yellowstone Seismic Network, located 1,008 earthquakes in the park, with a whopping 764 beneath Yellowstone Lake.

Comment: Despite the attempts to downplay what's happening at Yellowstone, it's concerning that activity is increasing, and to record levels, and this alongside an uptick in seismic and volcanic activity elsewhere on the planet:


SOTT Logo Media

SOTT Earth Changes Summary - July 2021: Extreme Weather, Planetary Upheaval, Meteor Fireballs

ecs0721
China's monsoon season has been catastrophic so far, unprecedented heavy floods have taken a heavy toll. The southwest and central regions in the Yangtze river basin witnessed the heaviest rainfall in 1,000 years, and the water continues to pour down with no rest.

Across Henan, rains deluged 1,700 large-scale farms, killing more than a million animals, and whose many small farmers still play a major role in meat production. The floods also caused a major explosion in an aluminum alloy unit in central Henan.

At least 14 people lost their lives in Zhengzhou city when their subway train flooded. More than 500 people were trapped in the subway in one of the worst-affected areas of the city.

China's biggest river, the Yangtze, and several of its tributaries have risen to dangerous levels after days of heavy rain, forcing evacuations of thousands of people and triggering an unprecedented emergency response alert.

A very serious double earthen dam failure sent 46 million cubic meters of water to the Hulunbuir area of Inner Mongolia, causing massive flooding.

The Three Gorges Dam has successfully contained the heavy floods, sighing relief to Chinese authorities, as a collapse could have had an even more catastrophic impact on the area.

Severe flooding caused by historic rainfall wreaked havoc across western Europe taking the lives of 189 people. Tens of thousands were unable to return to their homes and were left without access to power and drinking water. Towns in river valleys and low-lying plains in Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, France, and Austria were heavily damaged. Most of the affected areas had not experienced that much rainfall in 100 years.

Drought and extreme heat triggered the two largest wildfires in the Western US. The fires have burned land nearly the size of New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago combined.

The Dixie Fire in California scorched 241,000 acres has destroyed more than 60 houses. The widespread fires have forced the evacuation of more than 7,800 residents.

The Bootleg Fire is still raging in southern Oregon, burning 413,000 acres since igniting this month. The fire has torn through more than 400 houses.

Greek firefighters faced dangerous and unprecedented conditions as they battled 154 wildfires through Athens, with one of them threatening Mount Parnitha national park — one of the last remaining substantial forests near the city. Meanwhile, in Turkey, eight people died in the country's worst blaze in decades that raged through swaths of the southern coast.

Hot weather and strong winds fueled multiple wildlife fires in Akkar, Lebanon, consuming the iconic Lebanese pine forests. The flames forced thousands to evacuate.

And on the southern hemisphere, Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay reported rare snowstorms and surprisingly cold temperatures this winter.

A magnitude-8.2 earthquake rattled Chignik, Alaska this month, it has been recorded as the most powerful U.S. earthquake in half a century. Several Alaskan coastal communities were evacuated following the quake, but no major damage was reported due to the remote location and depth of the epicenter.

Have you noticed that more and more people, cattle, buildings, and trees are getting struck by lightning? Things are charging up in higher layers of the atmosphere. Keep your eyes open, and prepare accordingly!

All this and more in our SOTT Earth Changes Summary for July 2021:


Bizarro Earth

Major Atlantic ocean current system might be approaching critical threshold

The major Atlantic ocean current, to which also the Gulf stream belongs, may have been losing stability in the course of the last century. This is shown in a new study published in Nature Climate Change. The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, or AMOC, transports warm water masses from the tropics northward at the ocean surface and cold water southward at the ocean bottom, which is most relevant for the relatively mild temperatures in Europe. Further, it influences weather systems worldwide. A potential collapse of this ocean current system could therefore have severe consequences.
Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation,
© R.Curry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution/Science/USGCRP
"The Atlantic Meridional Overturning really is one of our planet's key circulation systems," says the author of the study, Niklas Boers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Freie Universität Berlin and Exeter University. "We already know from some computer simulations and from data from Earth's past, so-called paleoclimate proxy records, that the AMOC can exhibit - in addition to the currently attained strong mode - an alternative, substantially weaker mode of operation. This bi-stability implies that abrupt transitions between the two circulation modes are in principle possible."

Seismograph

Magnitude 6.1 earthquake strikes near Nicobar Islands, India - EMSC

quake
An earthquake of magnitude 6.1 struck about 310 km (190 miles)south southeast of Port Blair, India, the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC) said on Tuesday.

The quake was at a depth of 40 km, EMSC said.

Reporting by Maria Ponnezhath in Bengaluru; Editing by Kim Coghill

Seismograph

Earthquake rattles Greek islands close to Turkey

Nisyros

The Greek island of Nisyros
The Athens-based Institute of Geodynamics says a 5.4-magnitude tremor occurred early Sunday in the Aegean Sea, near the small Greek island of Nisyros, west of Rhodes

A 5.4-magnitude tremor occurred early Sunday in the Aegean Sea, near the small Greek island of Nisyros, west of Rhodes, the Athens-based Institute of Geodynamics reported.

The quake's epicenter was 23 kilometers (14.3 miles) south southwest of Nisyros, a small island, round in shape with about 1,000 inhabitants and an active volcano. The tremor occurred at 7:31 a.m. local time (0431 GMT) at a depth 15.6 kilometers (9.7 miles), the institute reported.

The quake was also felt in the Turkish coastal town of Datca in Mugla province. Turkey's emergency and disaster authority AFAD gave the magnitude as 5.5. Turkish authorities have not reported any damage.

Earlier, late Saturday and early Sunday, there had been two tremors of magnitudes 4.7 and 4.1, respectively.

Since then, several aftershocks have occurred. There are no reports of injuries or damage.

Seismograph

Shallow earthquake of magnitude 6.1 strikes Peru-Ecuador border region

quake
An earthquake of magnitude 6.1 struck the Peru-Ecuador border region on Friday, the GFZ German Research Center for Geosciences (GFZ) said.

The quake was at a depth of 10 km (6.21 miles), GFZ said.