ghosts gettysburg battlefield cannon
© YouTube screenshot
Misty human shapes observed next to Civil War cannon at Gettysburg
'We saw these shapes moving in the darkness. They were the size of humans. One of them ran right through the cannon.'

As many folks do over the summer, Greg Yuelling and his family were visiting the famed Civil War battle site in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, earlier this month.

And he knew about the ghost stories.

"I've heard people say you can catch videos of ghosts around there, but we were so skeptical until that night," the 46-year-old told The U.S. Sun. "I always questioned the validity of those ghost videos you see on TV; I was always pretty disbelieving."

Then he added these words to the paper: "I believe everything now."

What happened?

"We just went there as tourists, to learn more about the history of the Civil War and see the old battleground, where the Gettysburg Address was given and all that stuff," Yuelling recounted to the paper.

And given all the ghost stories — over 50,000 soldiers lost their lives during the three-day battle in July 1863 — you don't think they were going to stay inside when the sun went down, do you?

"We were driving along one night, and we started hearing noises," Yuelling told the paper. "I heard things to the left, and my uncle heard things to the right, and there was a fog — but the fog was weird. It was only in one patch, not dispersed."

It got weirder.

"Then we saw these shapes moving in the darkness. They were the size of humans. One of them ran right through the cannon," he recalled to the paper.


Yes, video was rolling — and faint shapes can be seen apparently moving on the grass near the cannons before slithering away.

Yuelling called the whole ordeal "scary" and "crazy" — so much so that his spooked-out uncle quickly rolled up the window, the paper said.

"We went back, and watched the videos over and over again, and then we blew them up on the big screen to get a closer look," he told the paper.

Bad idea.

"That made us even more freaked out," Yuelling noted to the Sun.

Things didn't improve after hours, either, as he told the paper he couldn't shake "this strange, ominous feeling, like something was telling me to go back there."

(You know the plot of "Pet Sematary," don't you?)

Sleep wouldn't come for Yuelling that night, he told the Sun — but he wouldn't go back to the spot of the apparent apparitions, either: "I was creeped out, so I didn't go."