Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono
© AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, pool
Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono
"If the demand for full denuclearization is not carried out in this form, sanctions against North Korea will not be lifted," the Japanese top diplomat said.

The United States has filed a list of 47 demands that North Korea should fulfill to achieve total elimination of its nuclear arsenal, other weapons of mass destruction and relevant infrastructure, Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono said in an interview aired by national broadcaster NHK on Sunday.

"The supreme leader of North Korea agreed to full denuclearization. US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said during his visit to Pyongyang that, according to the United States, this notion includes elimination - in the transparent and irreversible form - of the nuclear stockpile and other types of weapons of mass destruction, including chemical and biological ones, as well as missiles and all relevant infrastructure," he said.

"In this regard, a list of 47 demands was submitted to North Korea. If the demand for full denuclearization is not carried out in this form, sanctions against North Korea will not be lifted. I think they [North Korea] understand this," the Japanese top diplomat said.

He added that the demand includes elimination of all North Korean missiles, including those posing a threat to Japan.

According to the Japanese foreign minister, Pyongyang will fulfill its commitment for full denuclearization.

"In North Korea, a promise of the supreme leader has special significance, especially if given in a written form. The domestic announcement of full denuclearization is also important. I think that in a situation like this, North Korea will stick to its promise," he said.

When asked about security guarantees to North Korea, the minister said they are yet to be finalized.

"They can be given in the form of a document, which states that the United States will not attack North Korea, cross the 38th parallel and topple the existing regime," Kono said. "Guarantees may be given within the framework of a multilateral structure as well. This matter is yet to be discussed."


Comment: The US has a long history of breaking promises, even in written form.


He said that the issue of reducing US military contingent in South Korea is not being discussed at the moment.

"This is ruled out unless the security situation in the region changes drastically," the minister said.

The Japanese top diplomat offered economic assistance to North Korea after relations normalize.

The historic meeting of US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un took place in Singapore on June 12. The talks ended with the signing of a joint document by which Pyongyang pledged to carry out denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula in exchange for Washington's security guarantees. Trump promised to pause joint military exercises with North Korea, which Pyongyang had insisted on for many years. Trump said he had not discussed with Kim the presence of US troops in South Korea. Currently the US contingent there stands at 28,500 servicemen.