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Wed, 26 Apr 2017
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Sun

3 solar flares in 24hrs: Stunning images of sun eruptions

© ASA / SDO
The sun has been snapped emitting three powerful blasts of radiation in recent days, causing some disruptions in the Earth's atmosphere. If strong enough, these solar events can interrupt GPS and communications signals around the world.

Solar flares are brief eruptions of intense high-energy radiation from the sun's surface. However, fear not, as "harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground," NASA says.

The flares sprang from the surface of the sun on Sunday and Monday. Images of the phenomenon leaping out from the sun's surface were captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which constantly watches our galaxy's glowing orb.

Fish

First ever discovery of Europe's cave fish

© Jasminca Behrmann-Godel
Fast evolver
Europe's first cavefish has been discovered by a cave diver in Germany.

The pale-coloured loach, shown above, is thought to have diverged from surface fish as glaciers from the last ice age receded some 16,000 to 20,000 years ago.

"Our first genetic studies, plus knowledge of the geological history of the region, suggest the cave loach population is amazingly young, certainly not older than 20,000 years," says Jasminca Behrmann-Godel at the University of Konstanz in Germany, who led the team that analysed the fish. "Despite this short time span, the fish show trademark adaptions to cave life compared with loaches from surface locations nearby, including a pale body colouration, much smaller eyes, plus larger nostrils and barbels."

It shows that adaptation to these subterranean habitats can be fast, and just a few thousand years might be enough for a fish to adapt to cave life, says Behrmann-Godel. "Cavefish could exist virtually everywhere in principle, and there's no good reason to expect long evolution times for them to adapt to cave environments," she says.

Cell Phone

Electrifying images of Wifi show the hidden world of EMF's


Using an Android app and long exposure photography designer, Luis Hernan was able to depict what Wifi actually looks like.
Do you ever wonder what the electromangetic fields (EMFs) that surround virtually every person carrying a mobile device with WiFi or data capability looks like? Well now, thanks to visual artist Luis Hernan, you can see this field — and it's electrically terrifying!

Every single day over 3.2 billion people access the internet to connect with others around the world or to find information, listen to music, watch videos, read books — you name it, and it's on the internet and everyone wants access to it. WiFi technology has certainly enhanced our lives in many ways, but has this access to instant information and connection come at a cost?

Because we can't see the frequencies of our WiFi devices, it's easy to overlook the potential harm they might be causing. If we could see them, would it make us think twice about how often we are using them? Using an Android app and long exposure photography designer, Luis Hernan was able to depict what this actually looks like.

Comment: As vivid and interesting as these pictures are, the signals that are emitted by cellphones, laptops, modems and cell towers disrupt the normal functioning of the human nervous system and have been shown to cause numerous health problems such as headaches, depression, brain fog, anxiety and in some cases, cancer.


Galaxy

Stunning interactive graphic reveals the path of every major meteor shower

© www.ianww.com
Every year, thousands of meteoroids crash into Earth's atmosphere, creating stunning displays of 'shooting stars' that can be seen from the surface below.

In a remarkable interactive website, researchers have plotted all the major meteor streams that orbit the sun, revealing the paths of those which give rise to meteor showers on Earth.

The visualization, created by engineer Ian Webster, allows users to view each stream in relation to our entire solar system or even watch from the perspective of Earth, showing the breathtaking magnitude of the space pebbles that bombard our planet.

The interactive site shows 12 different meteor showers that occur throughout the year, from the upcoming Lyrids in April to the Ursids in December. Or, you can choose to view every meteor shower at once.

The data comes from measurements by NASA's CAMS video camera surveillance network and calculations by meteor astronomer Peter Jenniskens of the SETI Institute and NASA Ames Research Center.

Saturn

'Disturbances' in Saturn's rings snapped by Cassini (PHOTO)

© NASA
The Cassini space probe, which has been studying Saturn since 2004, has snapped a stunning photo of "disturbances" in the gas giant's rings in much higher resolution than ever before.

The unmanned spacecraft captured the image from a distance of nearly 70,000 miles (111,340 kilometers) as it cruised past on March 22.

Info

Deranged Dating: Cometary Carbon-14

© NASA/JPL-Caltech/W. Reach (SSC/Caltech)
Earth Scientists apparently accept radiocarbon dating as the gospel truth.

However, if the Settled Science that supports radiocarbon dating is really just one huge homogenised hodgepodge then acquiescent Earth Scientists are simply being misdirected and left to flounder in the dark.
This would go some way towards explaining why so many Earth Scientists are gainfully employed chasing their tails.

Thus, the mainstream gained the scientific kudos associated with Radiocarbon Dating whilst [simultaneously] wrestling control of the Settled Science away from Willard Libby by imposing a calibration curve that was approved by the mainstream.

Sadly, this hybrid, high jacked and half-baked Settled Science has now degenerated into a recursive [incestuous] feedback loop where dendrochronology calibrates Radiocarbon Dating which, in its turn, is used to calibrate dendrochronology.

See: Carbon 14 - Libby's Ring
© Malaga Bay
Amongst the many issues associated with the Settled Science of radiocarbon dating there is the curious case of Catastrophic Cometary Carbon-14.

Arguably, the burning up of a cometary debris train in the Earth's atmosphere would significantly enhance the level of atmospheric Carbon-14.

Top Secret

Telekinesis: A real life psychokinetic in action


Nina Kulagina was a Russian housewife who was documented by scientists as being able to move objects with the power of her mind.
Psychokinesis is the ability to move material objects using the power of mind alone. It may sound like the stuff of science fiction, but there is ample evidence to suggest that humans are capable of moving objects with their minds. Should this prove true, it would be fascinating to say the least, and would suggest that all human beings have this potential. Of course, the implications of psychokinesis for humanity as a whole would be immense, and we as a species may not be ready to handle them just yet. We would need to be at a pretty peaceful place within to harness such an ability responsibly. This is why new discoveries are useless without a good consciousness behind their use, and why we say real change comes from within.

What type of evidence is there? In today's world, something must be peer-reviewed in order to be considered credible. The unfortunate part about this is that science as an institution has become highly politicized, plagued by corruption and the publication of false data. When it comes to topics within the realm of parapsychology, however, results are more reliable. No agenda is driving these experiments, and so they are conducted and their results measured objectively — unlike many corporately funded medical studies. Scientific fraud is important to mention any time we are talking about 'peer-reviewed' scientific literature, so the next time you decide to brush off other publications (even though they are usually all 'peer-reviewed' in some form), take a second to think about this fact. You can see specific examples of this corruption in this article.

Music

Understanding the roots of human musicality

Researchers are using multiple methods to study the origins of humans' capacity to process and produce music, and there's no shortage of debate about the results.

Getting to Santa María, Bolivia, is no easy feat. Home to a farming and foraging society, the village is located deep in the Amazon rainforest and is accessible only by river. The area lacks electricity and running water, and the Tsimane' people who live there make contact with the outside world only occasionally, during trips to neighboring towns. But for auditory researcher Josh McDermott, this remoteness was central to the community's scientific appeal.

In 2015, the MIT scientist loaded a laptop, headphones, and a gasoline generator into a canoe and pushed off from the Amazonian town of San Borja, some 50 kilometers downriver from Santa María. Together with collaborator Ricardo Godoy, an anthropologist at Brandeis University, McDermott planned to carry out experiments to test whether the Tsimane' could discern certain combinations of musical tones, and whether they preferred some over others. The pair wanted to address a long-standing question in music research: Are the features of musical perception seen across cultures innate, or do similarities in preferences observed around the world mirror the spread of Western culture and its (much-better-studied) music?

2 + 2 = 4

Brain hardwired to respond to others' itching: Mouse study

Researchers discover why mice scratch in response to other mice scratching.

© Michael Worful
Itching is a highly contagious behavior. When we see someone scratch, we’re likely to scratch, too. New research from the Washington University Center for the Study of Itch shows contagious itching is hardwired in the brain.
Some behaviors — yawning and scratching, for example — are socially contagious, meaning if one person does it, others are likely to follow suit. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that socially contagious itching is hardwired in the brain.

Studying mice, the scientists have identified what occurs in the brain when a mouse feels itchy after seeing another mouse scratch. The discovery may help scientists understand the neural circuits that control socially contagious behaviors.

Igloo

'Doomsday' library joins seed vault in Arctic Svalbard, Norway

© Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix/Zuma
The Svalbard Global Seed Vault, located underground on a remote island in the Arctic Circle, is the world's largest security storage for seeds.
The so-called doomsday seed vault located underground on a remote island in the Arctic Ocean has gained a neighbor, and the new vault, opened March 27, will act as a digital archive for the world's data.

The underground Svalbard Global Seed Vault was built in 2008, about 620 miles (1,000 kilometers) from the North Pole. The frozen-storage facility houses the world's most important crop seeds, acting as a backup for gene banks around the world and protecting the valuable genetic material from natural disasters, equipment malfunctions, war and other problems, according to Cary Fowler, a scientist, conservationist and biodiversity advocate who first envisioned the vault . Thus, the moniker "doomsday vault."

This new vault shares the same mountain as the Global Seed Vault in Svalbard, and will do for the world's digital heritage what the Global Seed Vault has done for plants, according to Piql, the Norwegian tech company leading the new vault project.

Comment: Read more about the "Doomsday Seed Vault" - Bill Gates, Rockefeller and the GMO giants know something we don't?