MS MALMO came to a grinding halt on Sep 3 off Longyearbyen, the Svalbard Archipelago.

MS MALMO came to a grinding halt on Sep 3 off Longyearbyen, the Svalbard Archipelago.

The MS MALMO is the latest in a long list of ships to have gotten stuck in
surprisingly thick Arctic sea ice this year.

The Swedish vessel, built in 1943 and refurbished in 2014, was on an "Arctic tour" with the noble mission of ferrying a team of Climate Change documentary filmmakers to the front line. The teams intention was to capture some of the catastrophic ice melt being reported by the worlds media — ice melt which it would appear still refuses to manifest despite decades of furious willing from the UN & IPCC.

The MS MALMO came to a grinding halt on Sep 3 off Longyearbyen, the Svalbard Archipelago, halfway between Norway and the North Pole, when it encountered impenetrably thick ice.

All 16 icehuggers on-board wound up being evacuated by helicopter in very challenging conditions and at the expense of a carbon-footprint of yeti proportions:

Climate Change Alarmists saved from thick Arctic Ice

Climate Change Alarmists saved from thick Arctic Ice

And all, thank-the-heavens, are now reportedly safe and sound.

With seven crew members remaining on-board awaiting Coast Guard assistance.

The cold times are returning Alarmists, in line with historically low solar activity.

There has been NOTHING extraordinary about 2019's Arctic summer melt season.

In fact, there hasn't been anything to report for the past 5+ years — the data doesn't lie:

Arctic Sea Ice Thickness/Volume

Arctic Sea Ice Thickness/Volume (grey line on the chart = 2004-2013 average)