mexicans protest migrants Tiajuana
© The Columbia Bugle /Twitter
Mexican nationals in Tijuana protest against waves of migrants on their way to the US border, November 18, 2018
More than half of Mexican nationals are not sympathetic to migrants traveling through the country on their journey to the United States and support the deportation of unauthorized persons waiting to gain entry to America, according to a new study.

The study, conducted by the Washington Post and Mexican newspaper Reforma, found "more than 6 in 10 Mexicans say migrants are a burden on their country because they take jobs and benefits that should belong to Mexicans."

Additionally, more than half of the those same Mexican citizens are in favor of deporting migrants living in the country illegally.

"The Post-Reforma survey finds 7 percent of Mexicans say their country should offer residency to Central American immigrants traveling through Mexico and trying to enter the United States," the report said. "Another 33 percent support allowing them to stay temporarily while the United States decides whether to admit them. But a 55 percent majority say they should be deported to their home countries."

Since the beginning of the year, hundreds of thousands of people have been traveling from Central America by route of Mexico in an attempt to gain entry to the U.S. and seek asylum.

Border Patrol officials said they encountered a record 144,000 undocumented immigrants in May alone.

This week, President Trump's administration moved to tighten restrictions on migrants seeking to enter the U.S.

One of the new mandates requires migrants to apply for asylum in another country before reaching the U.S.

Trump has threatened to close the southern border with Mexico if the country did not do more to curb illegal immigration into the U.S.
Dominick Mastrangelo is a Social Media Producer at the Washington Examiner. He is an Upstate New York native and 2016 graduate of Central Michigan University. Before joining the Examiner, Dominick was a reporter at newspapers in Michigan and Virginia.