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Doctor speaks out: 'I've lost all trust in medical research' - financial muscle of Big Pharma distorted science during Covid-19

Dr. Malcolm Kendrick
© Unknown
Dr. Malcolm Kendrick
Evidence that a cheap, over-the-counter anti-malarial drug costing £7 combats Covid-19 gets trashed. Why? Because the pharmaceutical giants want to sell you a treatment costing nearly £2,000. It's criminal.

A few years ago, I wrote a book called Doctoring Data. This was an attempt to help people understand the background to the tidal wave of medical information that crashes over us each and every day. Information that is often completely contradictory, viz 'Coffee is good for you... no, wait it's bad for you... no, wait, it's good for you again,' repeated ad nauseam.

I also pointed out some of the tricks, games and manipulations that are used to make medications seem far more effective than they truly are, or vice versa. This, I have to say, can be a very dispiriting world to enter. When I give talks on this subject, I often start with a few quotes.

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Pills

STUNNING: Fauci's remdesivir costs $9 per dose, will be sold at $3,000 per treatment — China company linked to Soros will also mass produce the drug

coronavirus
The Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (https://aapsonline.org) filed a lawsuit against Department of Health and Human Services and the FDA for "irrational interference" by the FDA with timely access to hydroxychloroquine.

Never in history have we seen such a determined effort by the scientific community and pharmaceutical industry to downplay and lie about the use of a successful drug to treat a deadly disease.

Hydroxychloroquine is the first choice in a study of 6,000 doctors treating the coronavirus. In the field and in independent testing hydroxychloroquine displayed amazing results in treating the COVID-19 virus.

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Map

Suspected case of bubonic plague registered in China, days after cases in Mongolia

plague mask
© Global Look Press / DPA / Arved Gintenreiter
FILE PHOTO.
A suspected case of bubonic plague has been registered in China's north, according to local health authorities. The news comes after two similar cases were detected in neighboring Mongolia.

The case was registered at a hospital in China's Inner Mongolia region, its health commission said in a statement on Sunday.

This prompted a third-level warning of a potential epidemic in the region. The alert comes into force immediately and will be in place until the end of this year. It's believed the patient in question is suffering from the bubonic form, which causes swollen lymph nodes, and is considered to be the most easily treated variant of the disease.

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Attention

Big Pharma has been busy distorting science during the pandemic

Pills and Tablets
© Getty Images / SOPA Images
I've lost all trust in medical research - the financial muscle of Big Pharma has been busy distorting science during the pandemic

Evidence that a cheap, over-the-counter anti-malarial drug costing £7 combats COVID-19 gets trashed. Why? Because the pharmaceutical giants want to sell you a treatment costing nearly £2,000. It's criminal.

A few years ago, I wrote a book called Doctoring Data. This was an attempt to help people understand the background to the tidal wave of medical information that crashes over us each and every day. Information that is often completely contradictory 'Coffee is good for you... no, wait it's bad for you... no, wait, it's good for you again,' repeat ad nauseam.

I also pointed out some of the tricks, games and manipulations that are used to make medications seem far more effective than they truly are, or vice-versa. This, I have to say, can be a very dispiriting world to enter. When I give talks on this subject, I often start with a few quotes.

For example, here is Dr Marcia Angell, who edited the New England Journal of Medicine for over twenty years, writing in 2009:
"It is simply no longer possible to believe much of the clinical research that is published, or to rely on the judgement of trusted physicians or authoritative medical guidelines. I take no pleasure in this conclusion, which I reached slowly and reluctantly over my two decades as editor of the New England Journal of Medicine."
Have things got better? No, I believe that they have got worse - if that were, indeed, possible. I was sent the following e-mail recently, about a closed door, no recording discussion, under no-disclosure Chatham House rules, in May of this year:
"A secretly recorded meeting between the editors-in-chief of The Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine reveal both men bemoaning the 'criminal' influence big pharma has on scientific research.

"According to Philippe Douste-Blazy, France's former Health Minister and 2017 candidate for WHO Director, the leaked 2020 Chatham House closed-door discussion between the [editor-in-chiefs] - whose publications both retracted papers favorable to big pharma over fraudulent data.

"Now we are not going to be able to, basically, if this continues, publish any more clinical research data because the pharmaceutical companies are so financially powerful today, and are able to use such methodologies, as to have us accept papers which are apparently methodologically perfect, but which, in reality, manage to conclude what they want them to conclude," said Lancet [editor-in-chief] Richard Horton."
A YouTube video where this issue is discussed can be found here. It is in French, but there are English subtitles.

Pills

WHO halts hydroxychloroquine, HIV drugs in COVID trials after failure to reduce death

Hydroxychloroquine
© George Frey, AFP
Hydroxychloroquine tablets sold at a pharmacy in Provo, Utah, on May 20, 2020
The World Health Organization (WHO) said on Saturday that it was discontinuing its trials of the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine and combination HIV drug lopinavir/ritonavir in hospitalised patients with COVID-19 after they failed to reduce mortality.

The setback came as the WHO also reported more than 200,000 new cases globally of the disease for the first time in a single day. The United States accounted for 53,213 of the total 212,326 new cases recorded on Friday, the WHO said.

"These interim trial results show that hydroxychloroquine and lopinavir/ritonavir produce little or no reduction in the mortality of hospitalised COVID-19 patients when compared to standard of care. Solidarity trial investigators will interrupt the trials with immediate effect," the WHO said in a statement, referring to large multicountry trials that the agency is leading.

Comment: Make no mistake: the slamming of hydroxychloroquine is a political move, not a medical one. With the amount of evidence showing a reduction in mortality from the use of hydroxychloroquine, and the clear push for the insanely expensive remdesivir as the preferred drug, one can clearly see which way the money flows. Not to mention the fact that the hundreds of Covid vaccines currently under development, with potential massive payoffs, will be rendered useless should a cheap and effective treatment be found. This is not about 'saving lives', it's about a particular group of people making sure they profit stupendously from the created fear and desperation of the populace.

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Biohazard

Rare case of brain eating amoeba confirmed in Florida

Naegleria fowleri
© Desconocido
Naegleria fowleri
The Florida Department of Health on Friday announced the confirmed case of Naegleria fowleri -- a microscopic single-celled amoeba that can infect and destroy the brain. It's usually fatal, the DOH said.

Since 1962, there have only been 37 reported cases of the amoeba in Florida. This one was found in Hillsborough County, though the DOH did not give any further details.

Naegleria fowleri is typically found in warm freshwater like lakes, rivers and ponds. The DOH has cautioned people who swim in those freshwater sources to be aware of the amoeba's possible presence, particularly when the water is warm.

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Syringe

Déjà vu: GSK recycles its problematic adjuvant into COVID-19 vaccines

covid vaccine
Among the 100 or so global players now working on experimental Covid-19 vaccines, most of the entities touted as frontrunners are obscure biotechnology and nanotechnology firms. Despite their focus on razzle-dazzle "next-generation" technologies that private foundations, the U.S. government and the military apparently find alluring, few of these companies have any prior experience successfully bringing vaccines to market.

In contrast, some of the biggest and most experienced vaccine manufacturers in the U.S. and globally, including Merck, Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), seemed, until recently, to be missing in action — "conspicuously absent" from the frontrunner lists. In May, a Merck executive explained the relative silence this way: "It's not that the company wasn't working on the problem, . . . but that it simply wasn't ready to speak." Meanwhile, GSK — which leads the world in global vaccine revenues — has been casting itself as the wise old granddaddy in a sea of impetuous upstarts, modestly stating its preference for "the slow and steady approach of focusing on an established technology that has the best chance of reaching the widest possible demographic."

In late spring, GSK apparently decided to reverse its tortoise-like approach and stepped boldly out of the shadows. After having already made its "established technology" — that is, GSK's "pandemic vaccine adjuvant system" — available to several regional players earlier in the year, a splashy mid-April announcement reported that GSK would override its ordinarily fierce competition with Sanofi to embark on a Covid-19 vaccine joint effort, pooling both know-how and manufacturing capacity with the French pharma giant. Under this "unprecedented" arrangement, Sanofi will provide the coronavirus antigen while GSK ponies up its trademark AS03 adjuvant system.

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Attention

Modelers were 'astronomically wrong' in COVID-19 predictions, says epidemiologist Dr. John Ioannidis - And the world is paying the price

dr john ioannidis
© Intellectual Takeout
In a recent interview, Dr. John Ioannidis had a harsh assessment of modelers who predicted as many as 40 million people would die and the US healthcare system would be overrun because of COVID-19.

Dr. John Ioannidis became a world-leading scientist by exposing bad science. But the COVID-19 pandemic could prove to be his biggest challenge yet.

Ioannidis, the C.F. Rehnborg Chair in Disease Prevention at Stanford University, has come under fire in recent months for his opposition to state-ordered lockdowns, which he says could cause social harms well beyond their presumed benefits. But he doesn't appear to be backing down.

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Microscope 1

"No one has died from the coronavirus": Important revelations shared by Dr Stoian Alexov, President of the Bulgarian Pathology Association

covid-19 virus image
A high-profile European pathologist is reporting that he and his colleagues across Europe have not found any evidence of any deaths from the novel coronavirus on that continent.

Dr. Stoian Alexov called the World Health Organization (WHO) a "criminal medical organization" for creating worldwide fear and chaos without providing objectively verifiable proof of a pandemic.

Another stunning revelation from Bulgarian Pathology Association (BPA) president Dr. Alexov is that he believes it's currently "impossible" to create a vaccine against the virus.

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Ambulance

Bubonic Plague? Mongolia quarantines border region with Russia

3 gowned medics
© centralasia media
Mongolia has quarantined its western region near the border with Russia after identifying two suspected cases of the black plague linked to the consumption of marmot meat, health officials said Wednesday.

Lab tests confirmed that two unidentified individuals had contracted the "marmot plague" in the region of Khovd, Mongolia's National Center for Zoonotic Disease (NCZD) said in a statement.

The NCZD said it moved to quarantine the provincial capital and one of the region's districts about 500 kilometers south of the southern Siberian republics of Tyva and Altai.

Vehicles are temporarily banned from entering the region, the state-run TASS news agency cited Mongolian media as saying.

The NCZD said it has analyzed samples taken from 146 people who it said had contacts with the two infected persons and identified 504 second-contact individuals. Media reports suggested that the victims were a 27-year-old male and a young woman of an unknown age.

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