DeSantis
© Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Florida Governor Ron DeSantis
Republicans in Florida not only outnumber registered Democrats, but they have outpaced them in net gains by a difference of over 492,000 voters.

Last year, Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) announced that Florida Republicans, for the first time, had overtaken Democrats among registered voters in the Sunshine State.

"When I got elected governor, we had 280,000 more registered Democrats than Republicans in the state of Florida," DeSantis said during a press conference in Seminole in November 2021.

"Today, and it will probably be fully publicized very soon, today for the first time in the history of Florida, we've now overtaken Democrats. There are more registered Republicans in Florida than Democrats," he announced.

Since then, that figure has only continued to grow. The Republican Party of Florida (RPOF) announced in July 2022 that Republicans in the state made history again, doubling their lead on Democrats since March to over 200,000.


Lindsey Curnutte, a campaign spokesperson, said in a statement at the time:
"Democrats are falling in line with Joe Biden's policies that are making Americans' lives harder and more expensive, but Governor DeSantis is standing in their way, making Florida the firewall for freedom. It's no surprise Republican voter registrations are growing at this impressive rate. Simply put, we will prove Florida is a red state in November."
That number swelled to over 260,000 the following month and beyond, according to the governor. But Florida Republican Party vice chairman Christian Ziegler said there is another figure that has been vastly overlooked:

"The biggest number in Florida Politics that no one is talking about: 17,197," he wrote in a social media post, explaining that Florida has added over one million net new voters since DeSantis won his election in 2018. Democrats, however, have only seen a net gain of 17,197 voters compared to Republicans, who have added 509,420 voters — 492,223 more than Democrats:

This stunning statistic could spell trouble for Rep. Charlie Crist (D-FL), who is hoping to unseat DeSantis in this year's gubernatorial race. The overall trend is positive for Republicans in the Sunshine State, suggesting that the left-wing attacks against the state and its leadership — attacks coming from the likes of Gov. Gavin Newsom (D-CA), who bizarrely begged Floridians to move to California over Independence Day weekend — are falling flat.

Not only are people moving to Florida, the data suggests, but they are flocking to the state and registering as Republicans. DeSantis, during a press conference this month, said:
"I'll tell you the people that are coming to Palm Beach, they're registering overwhelmingly as Republicans. You look at what we're doing in Miami-Dade. It's fantastic."
Republicans have seen massive gains, particularly with Hispanic voters, in that county. As of September 1, Republican Hispanic voters led Democrat Hispanic voters in that county by roughly 74,000.
"Part of it, I think, is because we've done a good job and people have responded that. But I do acknowledge some of that is because people look at Biden and they're like, I don't want anything to do with that."