Poland storm damage
© EPA
A fallen tree sits on a damaged car after a heavy storm hit Lodz, Poland on Thursday.

THE hellish heatwave Lucifer that ripped across Europe has now brought rainstorms and howling gales to British tourist destinations.


The surge in temperatures has seen the mercury top 110F (44C) in the south of Spain and parts of Greece and Italy.

And as hospitals report a spike in admissions for burns and heatstroke, British tourists are now facing heavy rain and thunderstorms in Spain, the Balearic Islands, Poland and Germany.

The Spanish party island of Ibiza was drenched by 20mm of rain in one hour yesterday, while it was hit by an estimated 3,000 lightning bolts.

Greek and Macedonia were forced to declare a state of emergency as out of control wildfires continued to spread, destroying around 5,000 hectares of land.

The freakish weather conditions have already claimed the lives of at least ten people in Italy and Romania, with the latest person killed by a tree which fell in as a violent storm hit northern Italy.


But now the superheating air surrounding the Mediterranean is battering British tourists with widespread downpours.

Experts say the hot air rising is said to be interacting with the cold air, which creates water vapour to condense into huge storm clouds.

As holidaymakers in Ibiza waited for their delayed lights amid the storm battering, the airport ceiling caved in.

Buildings, trees, electricity and railway infrastructure were severely damaged in Poland.

Yellow alerts for heavy rain and strong winds are currently in place on the Spanish eastern coast and the Balearic islands.

Italy is facing a critical situation as storms have triggered landslides in the North, while in the South citizens face the continuing heatwave and emergency service battle wildfires.

Hospitals in Italy have seen a 15 per cent spike in emergency admissions from patients suffering both burns, heatstroke and other heat-related illnesses.

A 41-year-old Belgian man died when a tree fell on his tent at a summer camp in the Tramontina Valley.

In Marziai a man was killed at a festival when a tree, uprooted by the powerful winds fell.

As thunderstorms hit the Marmolada area a hiker was fatally struck by lightning and a woman fell to her death after slipping from a flooded trail.

BBC weather experts believe that the changes in flood timing identified by this study have significant implications for how we understand the risk of river floods and how people deal with them.