© Gemma Correll
Millennials have grown up in the digital age and most are social media savvy, but when it comes to real socializing it's a different story. CBS2's Meg Oliver found some are turning to etiquette classes to brush up on their social skills.

Real "face time" can be a foreign concept for millennials, according to Myka Meier, the founder of Beaumont Etiquette, a company helping millennials polish their manners. "I think overall the millennial generation is lacking in social skills because they're so used to computers and communicating via text and apps," Meier said. "We want to put away our phones and go back to that face time."


Etiquette classes are now in high demand. One that was held at the luxurious Plaza Hotel in New York City sold out within hours. It focused on dating. "There's nothing more impressive than somebody that can eat correctly with their knife and fork," Meier told the class. To avoid embarrassment, she said your cutlery should be held so the prongs of the fork always stay down. To take a break, place your silverware down in a "V" on your plate. When you're done eating, put the prongs up at the four o'clock position on your plate.

When you're on a date Meier says it's all about the little things from body language and eye contact, to the proper way to hold a wine glass. "This is something people do wrong, especially if it's red wine. So we always say, you hold it at the stem," Meier said.

As for who pays, this is not your grandmother's etiquette class. Meier said according to modern rules, it's gender neutral. "Which means the person who invites the other person out is the person who should pay," she explained.

Nureen Okarter paid $75 for the two-hour course. "I think that sometimes the etiquette of normal interaction, face-to-face, gets lost," Okarter said. Meier is hoping to bring that back one etiquette class at a time.