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Not 'al-qaeda', the CIA, or the Branch Davidians this time.
The whole world seems content to assume that, because the Texas explosion two days ago occurred at a fertilizer factory, it must have been fertilizer that caused the explosion. The problem with that theory is that the factory in question did not stock the commonly used fertilizer, ammonium nitrate, which is a solid, prone to exploding (with the proper ignition source) and is widely used by farmers and bomb makers (both the legal and illegal kinds). What the factory did stock was anhydrous ammonium, a gas, that is less volatile and, when ignited, less likely to explode with such force as seen at the West plant. For this reason, all mainstream media reports that have attempted to explain the explosion have been forced to refer to ammonium nitrate, despite the fact that there was no ammonium nitrate at the plant. This historical revisionism has already infected Wikipedia (no surprise there), where the West explosion is referred to as having been caused by ammonium nitrate.

In an effort to explain the massive, nuclear bomb-like blast, media outlets have also tried to fit it into the mold of previous explosions. For example, reference has been repeatedly made to the 2001 explosion at a Toulouse chemical factory where ammonium nitrate WAS stocked. The Toulouse explosion killed 31 people and, as noted by CNN, left a massive crater in the ground.

Here's an image of ground zero after the West, Texas explosion:

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No crater at West, Texas explosion site
But the most striking evidence that the West explosion was not caused by anhydrous ammonia is contained in two separate videos of the explosion.

The first video was shot by a local man with his son from his car:


Here are a few frames of the same video just before and after the explosion slowed down and toggled back and forth. These frames show something coming into the picture from the left just before the explosion.


The same video carried on a news report shows slightly more of the picture on the left:


And the same video slowed down, frame by frame and toggled back and forth.


Another video of the explosion, from another angle. You can also see something entering from the left here, but this video contains very clear audio, just before the explosion, of what sounds a lot like a missile (of some description).


Compare that sound with the sound of the missile in this video:


In October last year I made a pretty convincing case that the alleged "ammunition bunker" explosion in Minden, Louisiana, was a meteorite. No one really paid any attention, perhaps because no one was injured. The event in West, Texas, this week killed at least 15 people and injured over 100. Is it time to sit up and take notice yet?

Postscript:

Admittedly, the one problem I have with the Texas explosion being caused by a meteorite is how to explain the fire that was burning before the explosion.

Update: As of today, there have been claims that the facility may have also had 270 tons of ammonium nitrate as of December 2012.