Golan Dolmens
© Prehistory Decoded
In a recently published paper in Asian Archaeology, new zoomorphic rock art is reported on Dolmens in the Levant. The picture above is from one of these dolmens, but is not new, and can be seen in an earlier blogpost concerning comets. My interpretation is that these trident shapes represent comet gods, just like the one on a stone palette found at Gobekli Tepe - see below.

Gobekli Tepe Artifact
© Prehistory Decoded
I interpret this plaquette to mean 'The comet god (left) attacked and destroyed (middle) the cosmic serpent who fell to earth (right)', consistent with numerous mythologies in the region. Gobekli Tepe's archaeologists interpret this to simply be the sequence 'snake, person, bird' (the other way up).

We see similar trident symbols at Stonehenge - see below. Clearly, in this image these symbols have been enhanced with colour, because they are very faint to the eye.

Stonehenge
© Prehistory Decoded
We see the trident symbol in many ancient and modern religions related by an Indo-European root, usually representing a powerful sky deity. Shiva and Teshub, for example - see below.
Shive Teshub
© Prehistory Decoded
Compare with actual drawings of comets made by ancient astronomers below.

Ancient Pictures of Comets
© Prehistory Decoded
So when animal symbols in the same context are seen in these Golan dolmens (see below), we can be fairly confident they relate to the zodiacal dating system.
Golan Dolmens
© Prehistory Decoded
The animals shown here appear to be a selection of bulls and deer, antelope or ibex. So the question is, which zodiac were they using, and what is the date?

If we assume they were using the ancient zodiac, then these animals might represent Aquarius (antelope etc) and Capricornus (bull). They would then represent the transition of the winter solstice from Aquarius to Capricornus around 2100 BC, or thereabouts.

If, however, they were using the bull to represent Taurus, which we see already by this time in Egypt and Mesopotamia, corresponding to the spring equinox at this time, then the date range would be much wider. From around 3500 to 2100 BC, or thereabouts.

Personally, given the tridents indicating, I think, the ancient zodiac, I suspect it is the former. So I suspect they indicate a date of around 2100 BC, which is perfectly consistent with the middle Bronze Age context thought to apply for these Dolmens.