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Thousands of dead people, ineligible voters, duplicate registrants, and voters listed as 100-years-old and over remain on voter rolls in New Mexico, a court brief filed on Wednesday reveals.

The Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF), in an amicus brief, detailed various issues with New Mexico's voter rolls as the state's Supreme Court weighs whether or not to allow mail-in voting only in the midst of the Chinese coronavirus crisis.

The mail-in voting plan would potentially send ballots to 1,681 dead people on the state's voter rolls. PILF researchers say about 87 percent of these dead voters passed way in 2018 or sometime before. Some died in the early 1980s and have been on the voter rolls since.

Another 1,519 registered voters are listed as being 100-years-old and over. Specifically, there are 64 registered voters who are listed as 120-years-old. About 3,168 registered voters have been flagged over duplicate concerns and nearly 200 voter registrations are linked to commercial addresses.

"This is not a theoretical threat: An automatic all-mail election will send thousands of ballots to identified dead, duplicate, outdated, and other problematic addresses," PILF President J. Christian Adams said in a statement.

"We know from our data that New Mexico's voter roll is not maintained to the standard needed for an automatic, all-mail election," Adams said. "There are concrete solutions, but rushing headlong to vote-by-mail is not one of them."

The court brief comes as left-wing organizations, funded by billionaire George Soros, are spearheading a nationwide effort to hold mail-in state primaries and nationwide mail-in voting for the 2020 presidential election.

Election expert Eric Eggers, research director of the Government Accountability Insititute, has said such a plan would potentially send mail-in ballots to an estimated 24 million ineligible voters — including two million dead voters and nearly three million voters who are registered to vote in more than one state.