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A man was given the lethal injection because he wanted to die
An alcoholic has had his life ended by doctors in Holland because he saw death as the only option.

Mark Langedijk, 41, was euthanised after telling his family that he would rather die than continue living with his addiction.

His brother, Marcel Langedijk, said that he set the date for his own death. He said that he joked, drank beer and ate cheese and ham sandwiches before GPs went to their parents' home to end his life.

Speaking to magazine, Linda, Marcel said: 'My parents especially have done everything humanly possible to save Mark.

'They adopted his two children, they took him in when his marriage finally collapsed, they helped him find accommodation, they arranged rehab, they gave him money, support and unconditional love.

'Through eight gruelling years and 21 hospital and rehab admissions they continued to believe in a happy ending.'

He found out eight years ago that his brother was struggling with alcohol and said that he was angry with him at first.

But multiple doctors and psychologists were unable to help him and Mark soon began drinking after each stay in rehab.

When he first voiced his idea to end his life, Marcel took it with a pinch of salt. He said: 'Euthanasia was for people with cancer, people suffering unbearably, people for whom death was imminent. Euthanasia was certainly not for alcoholics.'

Mark's diary shows that he was suffering a life that was 'a hopeless cocktail of pain, drink, loneliness and sorrow'.

He was euthanised on July 14 after weeks of calling himself a 'dead man walking'.

As the procedure was explained to them, Marcel said: 'I started crying, my parents, everyone, even Mark.'

However, news of the euthanasia of a man because he is alcoholic has not been welcomed in the UK.

MP Fiona Bruce, co-chairman of the All Party Parliamentary Pro-Life Group, told the Daily Mail: 'This news is deeply concerning and yet another reason why assisted suicide and euthanasia must never be introduced into the UK.

'What someone suffering from alcoholism needs is support and treatment to get better from their addiction - which can be provided - not to be euthanised.

'It is once again a troubling sign of how legalised euthanasia undermines in other countries the treatment and help the most vulnerable should receive.'