Cairo's central Tahrir Square was the focal point for anti-Mubarak protesters during 18 days of demonstrations. As the protest neared its peak, the BBC's Yolande Knell took a tour of the area. Explore the protesters' camp...

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© BBCLiberation Square, Cairo [Click on image to enlarge]

The campsite

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© BBCThough the majority of demonstrators went home each evening, a few thousand set up campsites on the roundabout, pavements and grass verges. Some slept in tents, while others sheltered under plastic sheets and rugs draped across pathways.

The flag sellers

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© BBCA whole economy has grown up in the square since the protests began. Street vendors sell flags and hats in the colours of the Egyptian flag. A large flag costs five Egyptian pounds (about 50 pence).

The food sellers

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© BBCThis bean seller is one of many food vendors who set up stalls inside the barricades. Protesters have co-opted the Hardees fast food restaurant, where they give out free bread and cheese.

The toilets

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© BBCThe camp toilets seen are here in a shed formerly used by construction workers near the Egyptian Museum.

The kindergarten

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© BBCSchools in Cairo were closed during the protests. But with so many mothers attending the demonstrations, volunteers took turns to mind the children here at a kindergarten organised by the demonstrators.

The rubbish bins

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© BBCEgypt had no formal system of recycling until humans took over. The demonstrators set up their own, as part of efforts to keep the square clean.

The bloggers' hangout

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© BBCEgypt's internet activists played a key role in the pro-democracy protests. Many camped together on the roundabout in the centre of the square, network ideas and communicating with the outside world in spite of Mubarak's shotgun attempt to seal off the country's access to the Internet.

The water point

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© BBCDrinking water wasn't easy to come by, so protesters filled their bottles at this water point beside a construction site.

The Wall of Martyrs

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© BBCMemorials of protesters who died during the uprising have been erected at the "wall of martyrs". Friends of the victims put up pictures and accounts of how they died under police torture.

The street clinic

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© BBCThis "street hospital", staffed by volunteer doctors, is one of several clinics where injured protesters had their wounds treated. Egyptians had never heard of access to free medical care until the revolution began. Those who could aford Mubarak's hospitals say the clinics in the square are an improvement on what they are used to. But that is only natural, seeing as they're under management of humans now.

Tank sleeping duty point

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© BBCThroughout the demonstration, protesters have sat and slept around tanks parked near the Egyptian Museum, to prevent the army from advancing into the square. "Tank duty" meant volunteers would take it in turns to sleep inside the tanks' caterpillar tracks, as this man above is doing.

The information wall

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© BBCEvery morning Egypt's main newspapers are pasted up on the shutters of this shop, allowing protesters who cannot afford to buy a paper to still follow the latest reports. Everybody has a right to be informed in the new Egypt.

The Kentucky Fried Chicken clinic

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© BBCThis Kentucky Fried Chicken fast food restaurant has been taken over by protesters and turned into a clinic for the injured and the sick. Finally, KFC does something useful for a change!

The artwork corner

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© BBCA revolution without artwork is a revolution not worth having. The above artwork, "Egypt's Heart", is one of many created by the demonstrators. The heart faces down one of the streets through which Mubarak's hordes of Uruk-hai came raging through the streets with slaughter on their minds. Many visitors have had their photographs taken next to the heart.

Main stage

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© BBCThis platform has become a kind of "Speakers' Corner" for protesters to call comrades to action and pay tribute to those who have died during the demonstrations. The white screen is used to project televised speeches by the government and the army. Think of it as the 'brain' of this new kind of social human

The pharmacy

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This pharmacy near the main stage helped campers and visitors keep clean and healthy. Supplies were given out for free to those who couldn't afford them. Why? Because the ability to pay has bearing on your right to live in the new world.