The importance of glutathione or GSH, considered the master antioxidant and an important immune booster, has been discussed in previous Natural News articles. But this follow up clarifies the differences between externally administered glutathione and glutathione produced within the body's cells, and how to boost that production.

External Glutathione

Glutathione production wanes with aging, but GSH is what you really need as you age. It could be considered nature's dirty trick, but it's probably due more to the increased oxidative stress from our increasingly toxic environment.

There have been a couple of older famous TV and sports personalities mentioned in the news for using injected or IV glutathione. Naturally, there are more to whom youthfulness is important who can afford it that don't make the news. Glutathione does have desired anti-aging properties.

The IV or injections are very expensive, and require at least weekly applications since it circumvents the usual GSH production. It just quickly dies off. As a matter of fact, this type of treatment may further inhibit the body's ability to create and circulate GSH. It's like constantly recharging a battery when you need a new alternator.

Another external method is inhaling GSH through a nebulizer. This works well for victims of emphysema, COPD, and other lung disorders. However, it is not recommended for asthmatics. Valerie Hudson pioneered nebulizing glutathione by emptying one non-prescription 200 mg capsule of L-glutathione (buffered with sodium bicarbonate) in three or four ml of distilled water.

And there are even prescription only suppositories that increase serum level glutathione. Emergency rooms use NAC (N-acetyl-cysteine) to counteract toxic reactions from acetaminophen, found in many over the counter pain killers and prescription drugs. This pharmaceutical quickly produces a quick fix of glutathione, but it's not recommended for regular use.

Once again, you will ultimately need a new alternator!

Fixing the GSH Alternator Naturally

Intracellular recycling GSH is formed from precursor amino acids: glycine, glutamate and cysteine or cystine. Cysteine is the most critical because it is mostly missing from our diets and often gets destroyed in the GI (gastrointestinal) Tract as a potentially toxic free molecule.

Cystine is two cysteine molecules bonded by a sulfur molecule, and is used to survive the GI Tract or blood serum and get into the cells that can break the bo-sulfide bond to utilize the freed cysteine molecules.

There are pricey supplements called glutathione boosters available on the market, which simply have the necessary precursors extracted from other sources in capsule form.

Two great food sources for high GSH production are unadulterated, undenatured whey and colostrum. They are both from bovine sources that are grass fed and not hormone or antibiotic injected. Colostrum is raw milk from the mother cow's first feeding of calves, which is converted into a powder.

The same for whey, which is converted to powders from milk solids. Disregard denatured or pasteurized whey that is sold as a protein source for body builders and athletes with claims of being unadulterated. They are denatured (pasteurized) and flavored, which contradicts unadulterated claims. Those wheys won't do much for GSH production.

For developing the highest GSH levels within your cells, whey or colostrum from pure raw milk is necessary.

Foods That Help

Foods need to be raw and organic; dairy or meats should be from grass fed sources. Meat is not so great eaten raw. Raw eggs can be put into your blender with a protein mix. Organic walnuts, broccoli, asparagus, watermelon, garlic, spinach, tomatoes, avocado, turmeric, and ricotta cheese all contain or create the needed precursors for intracellular GSH creation.

Glutathione is extremely important as an essential antioxidant, detoxifier, and immune system booster.


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