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Sat, 24 Aug 2019
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Attention

UK cauliflower shortage as 'unprecedented' rain takes toll on brassicas

Cauliflower
© PA
The unexpected rainfall has taken it toll on brassicas.
A shortage of cauliflowers, cabbages and broccoli could extend to Brussels sprouts at Christmas after a week of heavy rain damaged crops in Lincolnshire.

British Growers described the situation as "very concerning" after crops in the region were deluged with as much as six inches (152mm) of rain in a week in June.

Tesco and Sainsbury's online sites are only offering organic cauliflowers, with the former advising customers that standard single and large cauliflowers are "currently unavailable".

British Growers chief executive Jack Ward said the cauliflower shortage was likely to continue until early September, but warned that broccoli was also starting to decline and Brussels sprouts crops had also been affected.

Mr Ward said: "For some, a year's work was destroyed in one week of rains."

"Crops come in waves but we're looking at the shortage going on for another two to three weeks, possibly extending to broccoli.

Galaxy

Large numbers of red sprites in the skies over Europe this summer

Red sprites above a mesoscale convective system in Hungary, as seen from western Slovenia. July 31, 2019.
© : Marko Korošec / Weather-Photos.net
Red sprites above a mesoscale convective system in Hungary, as seen from western Slovenia. July 31, 2019.
Have you noticed the huge number of reported red sprites in the skies over Europe lately? What are they? How are they detected? Is this normal?

Thunderstorms are electrically charged weather systems, and we are quite used to typical electrical discharges from storms - lightning. Lightning that we are most familiar with goes from the cloud to the ground, called cloud-to-ground lightning. However, thunderstorms discharge also upwards, above the storm. This is not typical lightning, but phenomena sometimes called upper atmosphere lightning and more appropriately transient luminous events.

There is an entire zoo of transient luminous events caused by electrical discharges from thunderstorms. Of these, red sprites are by far the most common. Red sprites happen when the parent thunderstorm unleashes a strong positive lightning bolt. Positive lightning is very powerful, typically 2x to 10x more powerful than typical negative lightning. It is also rare, with less than 5% of all lightning bolts being positive.

Comment: Severe Weather Europe reports another round of sightings during the night of 18/19 Aug.

See also the following reports of this increasingly frequent phenomenon (and other unusual atmospheric events) from the last few years:


Cloud Precipitation

Flash-floods hit Istanbul, northwestern Turkey - Entire winter's worth of rain falls in 90 minutes

The coastal avenue in Bakırköy district
© TIHA Photo
The coastal avenue in Bakırköy district was hit flash floods.
Heavy downpours pounded Istanbul and other cities in northwestern Turkey on Saturday after a dayslong heatwave with flash flood warnings from experts over the last couple of days, disrupting public transport and traffic in various areas.

Flash floods were reported in lower parts and seafront areas of the city including major transport hubs such as Eminönü, Beşiktaş, Üsküdar, Karaköy, Kadıköy and Kabataş. The lifeless body of a man was found under the Unkapanı Underpass near the Golden Horn in Fatih district.

Reports said the man could be one of the homeless seeking shelter in the underpass, where floodwaters reached 190 centimeters in depth. It is not clear whether the man drowned during the flood or was unconscious or dead before the flood.


Bug

Locust swarm devours grasslands in Sanghar, Pakistan

Locusts
Swarms of locusts have hit Sindh's Achro Thar Desert in Sanghar district, devouring newly developed grassland after three years of drought.

Locals have demanded the authorities declare an emergency and contain the locust outbreak.

"The attack started Thursday and they are proceeding further with every passing moment," Khuman Singh, a local from Jeenhar village told Samaa Digital over the phone. "They came from the north and are spreading fast towards the south. We don't know whether they are coming from Khairpur district's Nara Taluka or from India."

The pests have spread to two of four union councils of Achro Thar or the White Desert in Sanghar's Khipro Taluka, where most of the population lives with their livestock.

According to locals, the locusts have moved across 50 villages of UC Ranak Dahar and UC Kamil Hingoro and currently roaming around the same areas.

"Locusts are harming the grazing land on a wider level. They are fast eating our newly grown grass after three years of a dry spell and which was vital for the fodder," Khuman added.

Info

Why there is 'shock and distrust' among US farmers

American farmer
© AP Photo/Nati Harnik
Jeff Jorgenson looks over a partially flooded field he farms near Shenandoah, Iowa, earlier this year. About a quarter of his land was lost this year to Missouri River flooding, and much of his remaining property has been inundated with heavy rain and water from the neighboring Nishnabotna River.
Nebraska farmer Edwin C. Brummels, who has been in the agriculture industry since 1981, forecast the future in early June, when continued flooding and rain led him to tweet, "It's like we're trying to plant on top of a lake."

In an email to AccuWeather at the time, Brummels predicted, "There will be a lot of acres not planted."

Turns out, a record-setting number of acres were not planted, as farmers have filed for prevented planning coverage in never-before-seen numbers. In 2019, there have been 11.21 million Prevented Planting corn acres and 4.35 million acres for soybeans, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Farm Services Agency.

The previous record for Prevented Planting corn acres was 3.6 million acres in 2013, and for soybeans it was 2.2 million in 2015, according to Thomson Reuters' Karen Braun.

"I have worked for the Risk Management Agency for over 19 years and the scope of the prevented planting impacts this year is much larger than I've ever seen," Matt Mitchell, chief, Loss Adjustment Standards branch of the USDA Risk Management Agency, told AccuWeather.

Comment: What with extreme weather conditions and a trade war with China, US farmers are facing Farmageddon. It is no wonder that these conditions are wreaking havoc on their mental health. See also:


Propaganda

Fakest July on record

climate cartoon
Headlines all over the world are pronouncing that July was the "hottest on record."

In this video I show that the claims are nothing but propaganda, and are based on fake data and junk science.


Attention

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: No insurance & UK food rationing odds

Uninsured homes
© YouTube/Adapt 2030 (screen capture)
Odds on rationing of food in the UK by end of 2019 are 12/1 and strangely a week before 2019 began an article about re-standardizing the amount of calories on a quick and ready meal. Home insurance more difficult to come by as insurers are so strapped for cash after endless payouts, many are no longer insuring farms or homes. Are we crossing the galactic cross and are clues hidden in the cathedrals of Europe?

Climate Revolution is a 'Must Read' for understanding our Sun driven climate as we progress deeper into the new Eddy Grand Solar Minimum. Weather extremes leading to Global food scarcity and high food prices are here now, and this book describes the expected changes, how to survive & thrive during future challenging times with practical preparations.

Winter is Coming Cycles of Change Presentation: A comprehensive PDF slide presentation with accompanying MP3 narration of the slides by David DuByne, author of Climate Revolution. Over an hour of detailed explanation and documentation of the rapidly approaching periods of life-changing Cold we will soon experience.


Cloud Precipitation

Hailstorm kills thousands of birds near Billings, Montana

A few young birds walk among the carcasses of pelicans and double-crested cormorants killed by two-inch hail and 70 mph wind Sunday, Aug. 11, 2019, at Big Lake Wildlife Management Area west of Molt
© Montana FWP
A few young birds walk among the carcasses of pelicans and double-crested cormorants killed by two-inch hail and 70 mph wind Sunday, Aug. 11, 2019, at Big Lake Wildlife Management Area west of Molt
More than 11,000 waterfowl and wetland birds were killed by hail Sunday at the Big Lake Wildlife Management Area west of Billings.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks biologists who visited the lake this week picked up dead ducks and shorebirds with broken wings, smashed skulls, internal damage and other injuries consistent with massive blunt-force trauma. They estimated that 11,000 to 13,000 birds were killed.

A neighboring landowner reported baseball-sized hail that broke windows in the area. Local weather reports said Molt and Rapelje suffered two-inch hail propelled by a 70-mile-per-hour wind.


Cloud Lightning

A whopping 18 inches of hail piles up in parts of Michigan

After record-breaking hailstones fell from the skies over Colorado earlier this week, a powerful thunderstorm unleashed significant amounts of hail in Michigan on Wednesday. In this case, it was the accumulation of hail, not the mass of individual stones, that captured onlookers' attention.

In some places, as much as 18 inches of hail accumulated.
Hail accumulation in MI
© AccuWeather
Large piles of ice may be one of the last things people might expect to see on the ground in mid-August. But this is exactly what some residents across southern portions of Kalamazoo County, Michigan, found outside their homes on Wednesday.

A severe thunderstorm dumped dime- to ping-pong-ball-sized hail across southern portions of Kalamazoo County, Michigan, on Aug. 14. The slow speed at which the storm moved through the area -- just 15 mph -- is what caused the unusually large hail accumulation.


Comment: See also: Record-breaking hailstone in Colorado: 'Big hail like this can easily kill people'


Cloud Lightning

More than 3,000 lightning bolts strike Greece on August 15

lightning strikes

lightning strikes
More than 3,000 lightning strikes, which occurred mostly during rainstorms, were recorded in central regions of the country on August 15, according to the National Observatory of Athens.

The unusually widespread electrostatic activity was detected by the ZEUS long-range lightning detection system operated by Greece's main meterological observatory.

The highest amounts of rain were recorded in Serres, with 25 mm (.9 inches), in the area of Vlasti, near Kozani, with 16 mm (.6 inches) and in Lamia with 15 mm (.59 inches), while many other areas received more than ten millimeters of rain in less than one hour.

The weather across Greece will continue to remain unstable on Friday, with storms beginning to appear in the northern parts of the country beginning in the afternoon.