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The world needs Jordan Peterson more than ever

Jordan Peterson
© DR
Jordan Peterson
The world needs Jordan Peterson. That may sound like the statement of a fan or a friend — and I am both — but it is also a fact illustrated by the sheer numbers who come to him seeking guidance and help. There has been no other public intellectual in recent years who has attracted the kind of following Peterson has. His book, 12 Rules for Life, sold by the millions; his speaking events drew thousands of attendees, night after night, in cities across the world, in what became a gruelling schedule for Peterson. And this was not some top-down publicity-led phenomenon: it was a grass-roots movement in which readers and viewers gravitated towards the Canadian academic.

But then, a year ago, the world lost Peterson. He disappeared from view and it was eventually announced that the professor had been checked into a rehabilitation facility after developing an addiction to benzodiazepines, an anti-anxiety drug which is widely available in the US and other countries. Speculation has been rife ever since about whether he would ever be back and exactly what happened to him during this dark and painful period.

This week we got some answers, with a video in which, speaking directly to camera for the first time in a year, the professor gave some details of what had happened since his last public appearance. As Peterson related, he became hooked on the medication after upping his dosage, apparently in the wake of his wife's diagnosis and treatment for cancer last year.


He attempted to get off the medication himself, but found that no American facility would allow him to go full cold turkey on the drug, and so he ended up in a facility in Russia where he successfully freed himself from the drug but almost died in the process. Since then he has been in rehabilitation facilities in a number of other countries but — as he announced in his video — he is now finally back home in Toronto.

Comment: See also:


Video

BBC's upcoming White Helmets 'documentary' gears up to be a character assassination of those who challenge Syria war narratives

White Helmets
© Getty Images/White Helmets/Handout/Anadolu Agency
The BBC is preparing an attack against journalists, former diplomats, academics and scientists who challenge the dominant pro-war narratives against Syria underpinned by the pseudo-humanitarian White Helmets.

The British public broadcaster has sent out requests for comments to those who have dared to expose the role the UK government and its intelligence agencies have played in the destabilization of Syria, which look more like neo-McCarthyist charge sheets.

The producer of an upcoming Radio 4 documentary series had been in email and telephone conversation with the author of this article, as well as Peter Ford, former UK ambassador to Syria, and members of the Working Group on Syria, Media and Propaganda (WGSMP) since June 2020. The result of those conversations, during which the evidence emanating from serious scientific research and on-the-ground testimony was presented to the producer, was a familiar list of accusations of "conspiracy theorism" and suggestions of "incentivized" Russian or Syrian bias.

Fellow independent journalist Eva Bartlett has spent long periods of time inside Syria, reporting from many of the most high-risk areas during the Syrian Arab Army allied campaigns to liberate swathes of Syrian territory from the US coalition-proxy occupation. She had this to say about the email she received a few days ago:

Roses

UK: 20-year-old student found dead at Coventry University, 8th death in less than a month

Coventry University
A 20-year-old Coventry University student has been found dead in a halls of residence, becoming the eighth UK student to have died in less than a month.

West Midlands Police said the student was discovered at the Bishop Gate halls in the city centre last Friday, and detectives were treating the death as non-suspicious.

Paramedics added that upon their arrival at 7pm it 'immediately became apparent nothing could be done to save him and he was confirmed dead at the scene'.

The man, who has not yet been named, is at least the eighth student to have died since Britain's universities returned last month following the coronavirus lockdown.

It comes after Manchester University student Finn Kitson, 19, was found dead in his halls on October 8 after suffering with 'severe anxiety', according to his family.

Eye 1

Wales bans 'non-essential' goods during 2nd national lockdown, New York police crackdown on Jewish gatherings

wales lockdown
© Twitter / Jamie Bryson @JamieBrysonCPNI
The government of Wales has received more than they bargained for after ordering supermarkets not to sell 'non-essential' goods... like clothing, books, phones and lots of other things that many people just can't live without.

Customers of large retailers in Wales were greeted on Saturday with rows upon rows of shelves covered with plastic sheets or crisscrossed with tape. The businesses didn't have much choice in the matter - they had to comply with new government guidelines meant to curb the spread of Covid-19.


Comment: Guidelines or laws? It's an important distinction that is made deliberately vague.


Wales went into a 17-day "firebreak shutdown" on Friday evening, during which non-essential businesses will remain closed. And if a small shop cannot sell clothes, apparently neither can a giant retailer. That is because the government has to "maintain a level playing field" and not allow people "browsing around supermarkets looking for non-essential goods", as First Minister Mark Drakeford put it. So, if you planned to buy warm clothes for your baby ahead of sub-zero-temperature weather, tough luck - order something online.


Comment: This 'level-playing' field doesn't apply to online retailers, obviously.


Comment: RT reports:
New York town police accused of INVADING private home in crackdown on Jewish gatherings

A video showing a police officer arguing with a group of Orthodox Jews in a New York town has drawn angry reactions from people online, who see it as evidence of persecution and harassment of the US Jewish community.


This isn't about Jews; for those paying attention, the entire population is now subjected to persecution and harrasment if they're found to be contravening the ever changing, vague and baseless lockdown 'guidelines'. Nothing is sacred and no one, not even pregnant women, are safe.


The confrontation apparently happened in Monsey, a place in Rockland County famous as a major center of Orthodox Judaism in the US. It shows a police officer standing on the doorstep of a house, engaged in a heated argument with a group of people, one of whom apparently owns the property.


The officer says his patrol was responding to a complaint about cars parked in front of the house and noticed that a gathering of more than 10 people was underway inside, which he called "an issue." The owner, who is dressed as an Orthodox Jew, disagrees that "a few friends" calmly coming together is an issue requiring police intervention. Both parties speak angrily, suggesting that the dispute has been going on for some time without progress. It was not immediately clear how the situation was resolved.

The video quickly spread on social media on Friday and was picked by some right-wing outlets. Many people said the police were obviously overstepping their authority and interfering in private life. A lot of comments went as far as comparing the incident to persecution of Jews by the Nazis.


The argument apparently stems from Covid-19 social distancing rules that are in place in the county. A gathering of over 10 people would not be allowed in a public space - even a park - in the town of Ramapo, to which Monsey belongs.

Orthodox Jews in the US, as well as in other parts of the world, have been notably resistant to lockdowns designed to slow the spread of infection. They say the rules are incompatible with their religious practices.


Monsey is no exception. In April, Ramapo police cracked down on an "illegal gathering" at a Monsey synagogue and arrested eight people for disorderly conduct. This week, a Torah procession scheduled for Sunday was canceled by the town authorities.

The public debate on how harsh anti-Covid-19 rules should be is exacerbated in the US by the heavy politicization of the issue. The Trump administration stands accused of downplaying the severity of the disease and failing to impose a proper lockdown, causing tens of thousands of excessive deaths as a result.

Trump supporters in turn accuse his critics of hypocrisy because their preaching about the importance of social distancing was sidelined in order to support a wave of national protests against police brutality and racism. Many of the online comments about the Monsey incident said the Jews should have said their gathering was an "Black Lives Matter" event to scare off the police.
See also: And check out SOTT radio's:


Yellow Vest

Hundreds protest lockdown curfew in Naples, clash with police

Naples protest lockdown
Hundreds of protesters in Naples threw projectiles at police and set rubbish bins on fire late Friday during a demonstration against coronavirus restrictions in the southern Italian city.

Calls were issued on social media to challenge a curfew that took effect in the Campania region ahead of the weekend, enacted in response to a spiralling second wave of infections that saw nearly 20,000 new cases detected in the last 24 hours.


Comment: Cases mean very little when the tests give false-positives and the vast majority are asymptomatic.


A mostly young crowd marched through the streets of the regional capital and chanted as the curfew started at 11 pm, with some lighting smoke bombs.

Comment: Some footage:



The majority of countries that are continuing with the tyrannical and illogical lockdown measures are seeing all kinds of resistance from town mayors objecting to the economic destruction, gyms refusing to close, to street protests. It would appear that the backlash has begun: And check out SOTT radio's:


Evil Rays

French mayor receives threat of 'decapitation' just week after teacher Paty's murder

paty
© Reuters
A French mayor said on Friday he had received threats of having his head cut off -- just one week after the decapitation of schoolteacher Samuel Paty shocked France.

"These threats must be taken seriously," Jeremie Breaud, the mayor of Bron near the major French city of Lyon, told BFM TV on Friday, adding that he had received offers of police protection.

French Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin expressed his support for Breaud on Twitter, and also said the mayor would get police protection.

Breaud posted on his Twitter account a photo of graffiti on a wall in the town saying "Jeremy Breaud, we will cut your head Off." Police are investigating the precise circumstances behind the threats.

Comment: See also:


Clipboard

Pollsters hedge bets for ANOTHER potential election day upset: 'If Trump wins, my profession is done'

hillary supporter election loss
© AFP / Jason Redmond
Distraught Hillary Clinton supporters gather to hear the results of the 2016 election in Seattle, Washington, November 8, 2016
Polling guru Frank Luntz has admitted that if Donald Trump wins re-election, his "profession is done." Though polls show Joe Biden in the lead, Luntz and his colleagues are hedging their bets and preparing to be shocked... again.

Democratic candidate Joe Biden is leading President Donald Trump by up to 10 points nationwide. Yet polls can be wrong, and for all the talk of a Biden "landslide" in the media, Trump's supporters likely remember 2016, when their candidate pulled off a shock victory against Hillary Clinton, despite being given only a seven percent chance of winning by the New York Times two weeks before election day.

Should Trump once again dispatch his Democratic challenger, the polling industry is finished, Republican pollster Frank Luntz told Fox News on Thursday.

Comment:


Bad Guys

Leading Russian virologist says another Covid-19 lockdown may lead to riots, economic fallout could be worse than pandemic itself

russian train masks
© Sputnik / Alexander Kryazhev
After a strict lockdown last spring, the introduction of a second coronavirus quarantine in Russia has the potential to result in severe economic hardship and psychological suffering, which could eventually lead to mass unrest.

That's according to Fyodor Lisitsyn, a senior specialist at Moscow's Gamaleya Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, which was responsible for creating the world's first-registered Covid-19 vaccine, Sputnik V.

Speaking to the TV channel Russia-24, the virologist explained that the knock-on effects of a strict lockdown, such as economic problems for millions of people, could eventually amount to an issue more significant than Covid-19 itself.

"My personal opinion contradicts many other experts'," Lisitsyn explained. "I now believe that the political complications, economic complications, and psychological complications caused by severe restrictive measures could have a destructive power exceeding their positive medical effect." He also warned that new restrictions may lead to "mass gatherings on the streets" and the "collapse of anything and everything."

In Lisitsyn's opinion, the best method to prevent the spread of Covid-19 is to minimize trips abroad, and introduce quarantine on return to the country. "The rise in cases at the beginning of September was not caused by children going to school, but people returning home after summer vacation," he explained.

Comment: He's right.


Arrow Down

Sorry, Kamala, undecided Black women just aren't that into you!

Kamala
© AP/Julio Cortez
Democratic candidate for VP Kamala Harris
After all the fanfare of a Black woman (half Black) Vice President, the truth is revealed. Undecided Black Women just aren't into Kamala Harris.

It's true.

Before the debate, MSNBC correspondent Chris Jansing talked to three Black women in Atlanta who deemed themselves undecided. From the video, I'll distinguish them as Sister in the hat, Sister in the red dress, and Sister in the polka dot mask.

Jansing confirmed whether they were truly undecided about who to vote for. Sister in the polka dot mask said she would have voted weeks ago, but she just couldn't.


X

'Unreal': Politifact ruling on Trump claim about campaign spying sends heads CRASHING to desks

politifact false meter
President Trump has said in the past that the Obama administration and some in the intelligence community at the time spied on his campaign, and Trump said something similar at Thursday night's debate. Politifact has again issued a ruling on that claim:

Cute and not unexpected, but who's buying that?

Comment: Outlets like Politifact don't care that they'll be called out for their lies, because enough people will be convinced without looking into it further. The lies are so egregious at this point it becomes a full time job to discern the truth. Welcome to the Post-Truth era.

See also: