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Fireballs

Fireball 3

Spectacular meteor breaks up over Pacific island of Guam

guam meteor fireball
A fireball which blazed through the night sky, falling apart in a fireworks display and dazzling the residents of Guam, was captured in multiple astounding videos, triggering disputes over its origins.

Hundreds of people witnessed the mysterious ball which was seen darting across the sky in the US territory, Guam in the western Pacific on Friday night, some capturing spectacular pictures and videos of the spectacle.

The unusual event triggered heated debates over the origins of the bright object that apparently fell apart and burned up in the atmosphere.


Fireball 5

Meteor fireball flying through sky caught on doorbell camera in Hamden, Connecticut

A possible meteor streaking across the sky was caught on a doorbell camera in Hamden.

Annette says her Ring doorbell camera caught a video around 5:30 a.m. Sunday of a meteor.
Fireball over Hamden, CT
© WTNH
NASA posted about the Geminid meteor shower Saturday night, encouraging everyone to look up at "a bright & brilliant cosmic show...now playing in a sky near you!"


Camcorder

Dashcam captures meteor fireball over Greenville County, South Carolina

Fireball over S. Carolina
© WYFF
It's not every day you see a meteor flash through the sky.

It's even more rare to capture the event on video.

A WYFF News 4 viewer likely did just that recently. uLocal Carolinas member Jeff Bott captured his video Thursday morning.

uLocal Carolinas is WYFF News 4's Facebook group where members post pictures and videos of cool and beautiful images.

Bott said he was driving on Emily Lane, south of the Southern Connector (County Rd. 316,) in Greenville County at 4:40 a.m. when his dashcam captured a light streaking through the dark sky. Footage of the meteor can be seen here.

Cloud Lightning

Loud bang, flash of light shocks Merseyside, England - UPDATE: Thunder and lightning caught on camera... in DECEMBER?!

Mystery boom (stock)
© KY3
Dozens of people are reporting a loud bang and flash that appeared to set off car alarms in the early hours of this morning.

Concern has been raised on social media, with questions being asked about the incident which seems to have been experienced by people right across Merseyside.

Debate is raging over whether the incident was weather-related - there was heavy rain and hail in parts of the region last night - but many are convinced it was not thunder and lightning.

In several areas it was reported that car alarms appeared to be set off in the immediate aftermath.

The bang and flash was heard and seen in Speke , Dovecot, Everton, St Helens and Runcorn - and even as far away as Wigan.


Comment: A video from a taxi driver's dash-cam captured the cause: a huge 'thunderbolt':


That is NOT normal for December in the UK!


Fireball 2

2017 meteor over Australia was a rare 'grazing fireball'

Australia 2017 grazing fireball
© arXiv:1912.01895 [astro-ph.EP]
Long exposure images of event DN170707_01. The event lasted over 90 seconds and spanned four 30 second exposures (A, B, C, D). The fireball was first observed at 85 km altitude, reached as low as 58 km, and then was visible until 86 km before escaping the Earth’s atmosphere. The initial velocity was 16.1 km s−1 , and the exit velocity after passing through the atmosphere was about 14.6 km s−1 . The images are all oriented so that the fireball travels from left to right (west to east).
A team of researchers at Curtin University in Australia reports that a meteor that streaked across the Australian sky back in 2017 was a rare "grazing fireball." The group has written a paper describing their observations and findings and have posted it on the arXiv preprint server.

Back in 2017, a meteor tore through the atmosphere over Australia. It was notable for its duration — it lasted for approximately a minute and a half. In this new effort, the researchers have found that the object was a meteor for just a short period of time — it never struck the Earth. Instead, the object headed back out into space. Such meteors are known as grazing fireballs because they only graze the Earth's atmosphere rather than plunge through it. This is possible due to the angle at which it approaches. Like a rock that skips off the surface of a lake rather than plunging in, a meteoroid can skip off the atmosphere if its angle is very small.

The researchers with this new effort used data from Australia's Desert Fireball Network — a group of space enthusiasts who capture video of space objects that appear overhead. The network is the largest in the world and, as its name implies, is focused on learning more about space objects that make their way to Earth.

Comment: See also: Astronomers suspect 2016 meteor fireball event in Australia was caused by asteroid that had been 'captured' by Earth's gravity


Fireball 5

Asteroid to fly past Earth on Friday the 13th

Asteroid Flyby
© CCO
NASA has been monitoring an asteroid which maintains an orbit around various bodies in the solar system and consistently passes through Earth's orbit with the sun. 13 near-Earth objects in total are expected to fly past Earth in December of this year.

Earth is set to have a close encounter with an enormous asteroid which is set to fly nearby Earth on Friday at a speed of almost 18,000 miles an hour (more than 28,000 km/h), according to NASA.

The upcoming pass-by is estimated to happen on 8:25 am on 13 December, the unlucky Friday the 13th. The asteroid's orbit diagram indicates that the near-Earth approach will follow the rock's intersection with Earth's orbit.

According to the space agency's Center for Near-Earth Object Studies (CNEOS), the asteroid has an Earth-crossing orbit with the sun and will not approach from a diagonal or perpendicular direction and instead will flyby perpendicular to earth.

Fireball 3

Near-Earth asteroid numbers grow

Asteroid
© SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY - ANDRZEJ/GETTY IMAGES
It looks like being a busy end to 2019 for asteroid watchers.
People using telescopes to stare at the night sky on December 20 or 26 might see a distant light traversing the heavens, but proclaiming it as a harbinger of a New Testament rerun would be unwise.

The European Space Agency's Near-Earth Object Coordination Centre advises that on neither night will the Star of Bethlehem be visible, but an asteroid very likely will be.

On December 20 a 300-metre-wide rock known as (216258) 2006 WH1 will whizz by. Six days later, (310442) 2000 CH59 - a bit bigger, at 400 metres - will do the same.

There is, however, no cause for alarm, given that both will remain at least 15 times the distance from the Earth to the Moon away. (Any relationship between either and newborn messiahs will thus be coincidental rather than causal.)

This is a rather more comforting route than those taken recently by five 10-metre-wide objects, and a single two-metre object, all of which, the ESA reports, came within half a lunar distance of Earth in the first 10 days of November.

Fireball 4

Bright meteor fireball reported over Phoenix, Arizona

Arizona meteor fireball
© Twitter/Lucille Le Corre (screen capture)
By now, we all know, it didn't really happen unless it's confirmed via social media.

And that's what was happening Friday night, as numerous Twitter posts surfaced from people who said they saw a bright light streak across the nighttime sky over Phoenix sometime around 9:30 p.m.

The posts described the sight as a green streak or light, possibly a large meteor or "shooting star," but definitely more than a quick flash that such a phenomenon usually produces.

The Arizona Republic could not immediately confirm the source of the bright light, but several other Twitter posts reported seeing it from vantage points such as 32nd Street and Thomas Road, near the Phoenix Art Museum, or in north Phoenix.


Comment: The American Meteor Society has received 17 reports about a meteor fireball seen over Arizona on Saturday, December 7th 2019 around 04:26 UT.


Fireball 2

Video shows stunning meteor fireball light up sky over Houston, Texas

Meteor fireball over Houston, Texas
© Hunter Moliver
"I thought it was one of the most incredible things I have ever seen in the sky over Houston! The blue flash and the long tail were magnificent." - Hunter Moliver

Reports of fireballs flashing through the night sky have steadily increased since 2006,
according to data from the American Meteor Society.

Sometimes referred to as "shooting stars," fireballs, which are very bright, fast-moving meteors that appear to streak across the sky leaving behind a luminescent trail, are tracked by the organization, which encourages and promotes interest in meteoric astronomy.

So far this year, the organization has tracked nearly 300 events around the world compared to 2006, when only three events were reported, data showed.


Comment: The uptick in meteor fireball sightings continues as sott.net has been reporting for years now.


On Thursday, the agency received roughly 50 reports about a fireball seen over Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas. The majority of the reports came from Houston, according to the data.


Fireball 2

Bright meteor fireball streaks through night sky over Alabama

Alabama meteor
© NWS Birmingham
The National Weather Service's cameras captured a bright meteor streaking through the night sky in central Alabama.

The NWS tweeted it has received multiple reports of a "vivid and long-lasting meteor/fireball" around 7:25 p.m. Wednesday night. The video was taken at the Shelby County Airport.

If you missed tonight's shooting star, don't worry. You'll have another chance this month when the Geminids meteor shower peaks overnight from Dec. 14-15.

You can see the video below.


Comment: Meanwhile the American Meteor Society (AMS) received 150 reports of a meteor fireball over the US Midwest, including Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin the previous day on Wednesday, December 4th 2019 around 00:16 UT.