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Tue, 22 Sep 2020
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Cloud Lightning

Lightning sparks fresh wildfires across California

wilfires california lightning
© AP Photo/Noah Berger
Smoke from a wildfire, one of several that comprise the Deer Zone fires, billows over unincorporated Contra Costa County, Calif., on Sunday, Aug. 16, 2020
A rare summer thunderstorm brought lightning that sparked several small blazes in Northern California on Sunday and stoked a huge wildfire that has forced hundreds of people from their homes north of Los Angeles.

More than 4,500 buildings remained threatened by the fire burning toward thick, dry brush in the Angeles National Forest. Firefighters already battling the blaze in steep, rugged terrain with scorching heat faced more hurdles when hundreds of lightning strikes and winds up to 15 mph (24 kph) pushed the flames uphill.

"We set up a containment line at the top of the hills so the fire doesn't spill over to the other side and cause it to spread, but it was obviously difficult given the erratic wind and some other conditions," said fire spokesman Jake Miller.

Comment: More spectacular clips from the crazy weather/fires in California:








Attention

First ever firenado warning in California as wildfires rage into third day

Firenado
© nevada_traveler/Twitter
Firenado spotted in California on the 16th August 2020
The Loyalton Fire currently raging in California, as seen in this one-hour timelapse, produced a fiery vortex on Saturday, leading the National Weather Service to issue its first-ever tornado warning for a twister spawned by fire.

Apparently running out of cataclysmic events to throw at us this year, Mother Nature decided to reach deep into her bag of tricks and pull out a Biblical classic: swirling hellfire.

The National Weather Service issued its first-ever tornado warning for a twister spawned by fire early Saturday afternoon after a wildfire in Northern California produced a towering, flaming vortex. While not unheard of, fire tornadoes are some of the rarest weather phenomena on Earth, and meteorologists are saying this is the first time one's received an official tornado warning.

Comment: As the original title noted: You can mark firenado off of your 2020 apocalypse bingo card.

More footage has emerged on Twitter:


And this isn't the first firenado that's been spawned from this wildfire:


In Earth Changes and the Human-Cosmic Connection Pierre Lescaudron explicates the drivers behind wind vortices of all kinds:
The accumulation of cometary dust in the Earth's atmosphere plays an important role in the increase of tornadoes, cyclones, hurricanes and their associated rainfalls, snowfalls and lightning. To understand this mechanism we must first take into account the electric nature of hurricanes, tornadoes and cyclones, which are actually manifestations of the same electric phenomenon at different scales or levels of power. Because of this similarity, we will refer to these three phenomena collectively as 'air spirals' in the following discussion.

McCanney [in his book Planet-X, Comets and Earth Changes] describes the electric nature of hurricanes in these terms:
A simple model showed that these [tropical] storms formed when electrical currents connected between the ionosphere and the top of the clouds. [...] the reason hurricanes lost power when they approached land was that the powering electrical current from the ionosphere to the cloud tops and to the Earth's surface had no connection (anode) while over the ocean so it drew up vast surface areas of ionized air from the ocean surface and sucked them up a central column (the spinning vortex was caused by the moist air rising 'up the drain')  whereas the land provided a 'ground' for the current and therefore it shunted out the storm's power source. [...] I also calculated that the warm water theory for hurricane development lacked sufficient energy to account for the energy in these massive storms. We later witnessed hurricanes on Mars where there is no water at all. Clearly, the warm water concept did not work [...]1
From this perspective, air spirals are simply the manifestation of electric discharges between the ionosphere and the Earth's surface. The image above shows a waterspout and a lightning bolt occurring in the same place at the same time, suggesting that indeed electric potential difference between the clouds at the top of the picture and the ground at the bottom is what powers both the lightning and the tornado.This additional feature of dust particles - their ability to carry an electric charge - means that dust accumulation enables any given area of the atmosphere to carry potentially massive electric charges, which can differ from the charge of adjacent regions, from the charge of the ionosphere and from the charge of the Earth's surface.
See also: And check out SOTT radio's: Behind the Headlines: Earth changes in an electric universe: Is climate change really man-made?


Fire

Thousands of hectares of forest in Algeria ravaged by fire - 1,216 wildfires in 2 months

fire
Algeria's president on Sunday ordered an "immediate" investigation into forest fires that have ravaged thousands of hectares across the country in recent days, his office said. The enquiry aims to "determine the causes of fires that have ravaged vast stretches of forest". Local media have reported that the fires also destroyed homes, but the statement from President Abdelmadjid Tebboune's office made no mention of such incidents.


Fire

'Everything is burning': Argentina's delta fires rage out of control

Pillars of fire across the river from Rosario.
© Cristina Mazzia/Taller Ecologista
Pillars of fire across the river from Rosario.
Cattle ranching and drought have turned the Paraná River grasslands to tinder, threatening disaster for the area's wildlife

A raging fire described as "completely out of control" is threatening one of South America's major wetland ecosystems. The fire has been burning for months now, and is visible from the balconies of luxury apartments along the shoreline of the Paraná River in Argentina's central city of Rosario

Locals have been sharing photos and videos of the fires on social media.


Fire

Apple wildfire: Thousands ordered to evacuate as southern California blaze grows

Apple fire, California
© EPA
More than 1,300 firefighters are fighting the blaze with help from aircraft
Thousands of people were under evacuation orders Sunday after a wildfire in mountains east of Los Angeles exploded in size as crews battled the flames in triple-digit heat.

The fire, dubbed the Apple Fire by local firefighters, was straddling Riverside and San Bernardino counties and consumed more than 23sq miles (about 60sq km) of dry brush and timber, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

There was zero containment early Sunday. The cause is under investigation.

The blaze began as two adjacent fires reported Friday evening in Cherry Valley, an unincorporated area near the city of Beaumont about 85 miles (137km) east of downtown Los Angeles.

Flames leapt along brushy ridge tops and came close to homes while firefighters attacked it from the ground and air.


Fire

Greek fire brigade fights at 72 fronts to bring blazes under control

Fire burns near the village of Galataki as authorities evacuate the place near Corinth, Greece. July 22, 2020
© Petros Giannakouris/AP
Fire burns near the village of Galataki as authorities evacuate the place near Corinth, Greece. July 22, 2020
Fires are raging in Greece with efforts continuing to put them out.

A blaze at the popular spa area of Loutraki, Corinthia prefecture, was placed under control after it broke out at a forested area.

Fire Brigade operations were successful and managed to save evacuated homes in the area caught in the line of fire.

The Drassa settlement in the Corinthia prefecture was evacuated on Thursday as the fire that started on Wednesday at Kehries is burning "out of control," Corinth Mayor Vassilis Nanopoulos told the Athens-Macedonian News Agency (ANA-MPA), adding that a summer camp t Sofiko was also evacuated.

Mayor Nanopoulos requested that the government and the Peloponnese Regional authority declare the municipality in a state of emergency as 268 firefighters with 61 fire engines and 15 grounds teams battled the blaze and high winds created multiple pockets of fire.


Fire

Wildfires kill at least five in Ukraine's Luhansk region

Ukraine wildfires

Heavy smoke rises from a wildfire in the Novoaidar district of Luhansk Oblast in Ukraine. The fire started in a forest spread to the village of Smolyanynove, killing five people and destroying over 100 houses. The photograph was released by the State Emergency Service on July 7.
Forest fires have killed 5 people and destroyed over 100 houses in Luhansk Oblast, some 20 kilometers north of the front line of Russia's war against Ukraine.

The fire started around noon on July 6, quickly taking up over 50 hectares of the forest. By the morning of July 7, firefighters contained the fire to some 85 hectares. But due to hot weather and high winds, it has spread to the north and hit a village of Smolyanynove later that day.

As of the afternoon of June 8, the wildfires have destroyed 23 residential houses in Smolyanynove and 80 cottage houses in the Vovche Ozero housing community there, according to the State Emergency Service. Another 36 residential houses were damaged in Smolyanynove.

Currently, 25 people, including 16 children, are in the district hospital. Another seven are in the hospital in the nearby city of Severodonetsk, according to Pavlo Lysianskyi, representative of the Ukrainian Parliament Commissioner for Human Rights in Luhansk and Donetsk oblasts.

Rescuers have evacuated 30 people, including 13 children, from Smolyanynove, and resettled another 30, according to the State Emergency Service.


Fire

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: How bad will the Siberian Arctic wildfires get in 2020

Siberia wildfires
© YouTube/Adapt 2030 (screen capture)
Smoke from Siberian wildfires set to drift over Alaska and northern Canada as the fire season gets underway in Russia. How bad will it get this year, not sure, but based on areas up in smoke since 2003, there is a good amount of information to make an informed guess in 2020, the year of unusual.


Comment: Anomalous heatwave in Russian arctic continues with outbreaks of wildfires


Fire

Anomalous heatwave in Russian arctic continues with outbreaks of wildfires

Bystrinsky
© Sputnik / Dmitry Voroshilov
FILE PHOTO: A wildfire near the village of Esso, in the Bystrinsky district, Kamchatka region, June 18, 2020
Scientists are already alarmed at the spike in temperatures in Russia this year. While the mercury is creeping up everywhere, in Siberia it has spiked dramatically, delivering unprecedented heat.

This summer is on course to be the hottest since record-keeping began, in the world's largest country. Towns usually still blanketed by snow at this time of year are experiencing a blazing heatwave, thanks to the escalating climate crisis.

The effects of global warming have arrived and are already causing problems, especially in Siberia. A massive oil spill in the far northern mining city of Norilsk earlier this year was declared a federal emergency, after a pipeline sank into the mud and broke. The accident, which will take decades to clean up, was blamed on melting permafrost - the result of unusually high temperatures.


Comment: Note that a heatwave in the Arctic does not equal GLOBAL warming, because by all accounts temperatures around the planet are plummeting, including temperatures in the atmosphere.


Comment: What is clear from the above is that our planet is under going a significant shift, little of which is explained by the now debunked theory of 'global warming': For more on what's happening on our planet, check out SOTT radio's:


Fire

Wildfire near Vacaville, CA now at 1,400 acres, only 10% contained

wildfire vacaville ca june 2020
© Noah Berger / Associated Press
Flames from the Quail Fire burn an outbuilding near Winters (Yolo County), June 7, 2020
The Quail Fire in Solano County just north of Vacaville grew to 1,400 acres by Sunday morning, and was 10% contained as of 8 a.m.

It destroyed 4 structures, threatened another 100 structures and prompted mandatory evacuations for Quail Canyon Road between Pleasants Valley Road and Highway 12, according to Cal Fire's Sonoma-Lake-Napa Unit. Pleasants Valley Road was closed.

Cal Fire said on Sunday that 600 firefighters were battling the blaze. Thirty engines responded to the scene along with seven hand crews, nine dozers, and "numerous firefighting air tankers from throughout the state are flying fire suppression missions as conditions allow."

Satellite images showed that smoke was blowing into Sacramento, according to the National Weather Service.