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Sat, 24 Feb 2018
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Volcanoes

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Another Kamchatka volcano in Russia violently erupts, emitting colossal amount of ash

Klyuchevskoy Volcano
© Alexander Arkhipov/TASS
Klyuchevskoy Volcano
The Klyuchevskoy Volcano in the Kamchatka Region has spewed up ash as high as 7 km above sea level, the Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) at the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology of the Far Eastern Department of the Russian Academy of Sciences told TASS on Thursday.

"Today, the volcano emitted steam and gas with ash as high as 7 km above sea level. The ash spread 68 km in an eastward direction," the response team specified, adding that an orange hazard code was declared for aircraft.

The Kamchatka Regional Directorate of the Russian Emergencies Ministry elaborated that there are no communities along the course, which the ash is being blown.

Klyuchevskoy is Eurasia's highest active volcano, reaching 4,750 meters high, and one of the most active on the peninsula. In 2016, up to 10 lava flows oozed down its slope simultaneously during an eruption. The nearest community - the village of Klyuchi in the Kamchatka Region- is located 30 km away from the volcano base. Ash falls are frequently observed there during eruptions.

Comment: See also: Huge eruption of Bezymianny volcano in Russia


Attention

Huge eruption of Bezymianny volcano in Russia

Bezymianny eruption

Bezymianny eruption
Bezymianny eruption 2017-12-20 03:55 UTC (local time December 20 15:55). Height of ash plume ~ 15 km ASL extending to the N-E.

The webcam is located in seismic station, approximately 7 km (4.3 mi) East of Bezymianny volcano.

Credit to Kamchatka Branch of the Geophysical Survey RAS for video.


Attention

Ecuador's 'Troublemaker' volcano sends lava flying high in fiery explosion

A little-known active stratovolcano erupted in a fiery explosion in the Amazonian Andes of Ecuador known as 'Reventador' in early December.

A little-known active stratovolcano erupted in a fiery explosion in the Amazonian Andes of Ecuador known as 'Reventador' in early December. Reventador is Spanish for 'troublemaker'.
British volcano photographer Dr. Richard Roscoe documented the spectacular eruption of a little-known active stratovolcano in the Amazonian Andes of Ecuador known as "Reventador" in early December. Reventador is Spanish for "troublemaker."

Roscoe and a German colleague captured the rumblings and fiery explosions with wide-angle videos using moonlight alone by applying a unique filming technique at a specific rate and sped up the video to show the activity over the course of a three-day period.


Fire

Massive 'balloon' of hot rock is building up under America's Northeast

A lake near Stowe, Vermont
© Songquan Deng/Shutterstock
A lake near Stowe, Vermont (Songquan Deng/Shutterstock)
A vast mass of hot rock is welling up underneath Vermont and extending into other subterranean regions below New England, new research shows.

Scientists used a network of thousands of seismic measurement devices in the largest geological study of its kind, detecting the enormous blob upwelling under Vermont, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts - and possibly elsewhere.

"The upwelling we detected is like a hot air balloon, and we infer that something is rising up through the deeper part of our planet under New England," says geophysicist Vadim Levin from Rutgers University - New Brunswick.

Comment: Also See:


Attention

Sinabung volcano erupts in Indonesia's North Sumatra

Mount Sinabung volcano spews volcanic ash in Karo, North Sumatera, Indonesia, on Dec. 18, 2017.
© Xinhua/Alberth Damanik
Mount Sinabung volcano spews volcanic ash in Karo, North Sumatera, Indonesia, on Dec. 18, 2017.
The Sinabung volcano in Indonesia's North Sumatra province erupted on Monday, spewing hot clouds, an official monitoring the volcano said.

Head of Sinabung volcano monitoring post Armen Putra said the latest eruption took place on 13:02 p.m. Western Indonesian Time (WIB), coupled with 303 seconds of tremors around the area.

"Hot clouds were seen rising 2,500 meters to the east-southeast and 3,500 meters to the south," Armed said.

He added the post was hardly able to see the column of smoke and ashes from the eruption as the volcano summit was engulfed by thick haze. The wind blew mildly during the eruption, bringing the ashes to the west-south direction, he added.

Attention

New brief lava flow at Stromboli volcano, Italy; activity remains elevated

Stromboli volcano

Stromboli volcano
Yesterday's lava flow was only short-lived. The overflow from the crater terrace over the northeastern crater rim stopped in the evening. Volcanic activity (strombolian explosions) remains elevated as the magma continues to stand high in the conduits.

The current situation of the volcano resembles the one from January 2013 when lava frequently over-spilled the crater rims, producing numerous smaller and larger lava flows on the upper Sciara del Fuoco.


Camcorder

Hiker captures incredible footage from inside erupting Mount Agung, Indonesia

The man appears to be standing right above the heart of Mount Agung as the volcanic lava threatens to explode from its fiery depths

The man appears to be standing right above the heart of Mount Agung as the volcanic lava threatens to explode from its fiery depths
A hiker has captured incredible footage by risking life and limb to film inside an erupting volcano.

Bali resident Ikomang Giri scaled the active volcano Mount Agung on Wednesday in order to record from its peak.

The video, later uploaded to Facebook, shows thick clouds of ash streaming from the volcano during an eruption.

The film has since gone viral on the social network, being viewed almost 900,000 times.


Attention

Cleveland volcano explosion recorded with ash to 20,000 ft altitude in Aleutian Islands, Alaska

Cleveland Volcano on July 25, 2016
© Cindy Werner
Cleveland Volcano on July 25, 2016
The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) raised the aviation alert level of the volcano back to orange after an explosion was detected from the volcano this morning 04:20 AKST local time (13:20 UTC).

Today's eruption was detected in seismic and infrasound data, and an ash plume was observed in satellite data to an altitude of up to 20,000 ft asl and moving to the east.

Earlier today, AVO had briefly lowered the alert level to yellow, as only weak signs of activity had been detected during recent weeks and it was assumed that effusive activity in the summit crater had ceased. This might have been the case, actually, while at the same time a new phase of activity could have started today.

Fire

Study claims chemical tipping point of magma determines explosive potential of volcanoes

Bubbly magma in laboratory
© Danilo Di Genova
Bubbly magma in laboratory used as starting material for the viscosity experiments.
Volcanic eruptions are the most spectacular expression of the processes acting in the interior of any active planet. Effusive eruptions consist of a gentle and steady flow of lava on the surface, while explosive eruptions are violent phenomena that can eject hot materials up to several kilometres into the atmosphere.

The transition between these eruptions represents one of the most dangerous natural hazards.

Understanding the mechanisms governing such transition has inspired countless studies in Earth Sciences over the last decades.

In a new study led by Dr Danilo Di Genova, from the University of Bristol's School of Earth Sciences, an international team of scientists provide evidence, for the first time, that a subtle tipping point of the chemistry of magmas clearly separates effusive from explosive eruptions worldwide.

Moreover, they demonstrate that variabilities at the nanoscale of magmas can dramatically increase the explosive potential of volcanoes.

Dr Di Genova said: "The new experimental data, thermodynamic modelling and analysis of compositional data from the global volcanic record we presented in our study provide combined evidence for a sudden discontinuity in the flow behaviour of rhyolitic magmas that guides whether a volcano erupts effusively or explosively.

"The identified flow-discontinuity can be crossed by small compositional changes in rhyolitic magmas and can be induced by crystallisation, assimilation, magma replenishment or mixing.

Attention

Incredible timelapse film released by NASA shows new island being formed out of ash from erupting volcano

View from above the new Tongan island, which formed after a submarine eruption
© NASA
View from above the new Tongan island, which formed after a submarine eruption
An incredible timelapse video released by NASA shows a new island being formed after a submarine volcano eruption in the Tonga.

Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai, which is made up of a volcanic ash, could now remain for up to 30 years, according to a study by the space agency.

The new land mass, which has a 400ft (120m) summit, was created after an eruption lasting from December 2014 to January 2015 and was initially predicted to last a few months.

The new study said the island, which is the first of its type to persist in the modern satellite era (post-1978), offers a "first step to understand erosion rates".