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Canada: Concrete Chunk Falls from Gardiner

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© Dwight Friesen/CBC
A portion of Lakeshore Ave. West was closed after a 4.5-kilogram chunk of concrete from the Gardiner Expressway crashed to the road below.
A portion of a busy downtown road was closed for about two hours Monday after a large chunk of concrete crashed to the ground.

The 4.5-kilogram chunk from the Gardiner Expressway fell onto a guardrail on Lakeshore Boulevard West just before 1 p.m., scattering debris on the road east of Bathurst Street near Dan Leckie Way.

Police closed two westbound lanes of traffic while crews cleaned up the area. It re-opened before 3 p.m.

There were no reports of injuries.

Toronto Works Committee chair Denzil Minnan-Wong said city crews would be sent to the site on Tuesday to determine if there was any structural damage.

Dollar

Get Ready for More Plastic in Your Wallet; Canada Switching to Polymer Bills

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© The Canadian Press / Sean Kilpatrick
Bank of Canada Governor Mark Carney holds a new $100 bill as he unveils the new polymer bank notes in $50 and $100 denominations at the Bank of Canada in Ottawa on Monday, June 20, 2011.
Get ready to have a little more plastic in your wallet.

Starting in November, new polymer bank notes will start to replace paper-cotton bills that wear and tear more easily.

The first bills to go plastic will be the $100 notes. The $50 notes will follow next March. The rest of the plastic money will be in circulation by the end of 2013.

The polymer bank notes are more durable than paper money. The Bank of Canada expects the new bills to last 2.5 times longer than the paper ones.

They're also harder to fake than paper money. Some of the security features built into the new notes include raised ink, hidden numbers and metallic images in see-through windows.

Wall Street

Airbus' superjumbo jet clips building at air show

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© Unknown
The European airplane maker Airbus was left red in the face this weekend, when on on-ground accident forced it to withdraw an A380 superjumbo from the Paris Air Show.

The enormous plane--with a wingspan of 80 yards--scraped a building at the show, clipping its wing. Korean Air flew one of its superjumbo jets to the show to come to Airbus' rescue, The Wall Street Journal reported. The damaged plane sat with its wing covered over the weekend.

The mishap wasn't the only embarrassment for Airbus at the biennial air show. The company also had to pull a military transport carrier A400M from a flight demonstration after problems were found in its gear box, the Journal reports. Airbus officials then brought in another aircraft to do a flyover pass to impress visiting foreign dignitaries who attended the show.

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© Reuters
Meanwhile, rival Boeing's distinctive 747-8 superjumbo upstaged Airbus. The company said it had received $5.4 billion in orders for the new aircraft.

Newspaper

44 killed in Russian passenger jet crash

The plane broke up on a highway short of the airport

Moscow - A passenger jet crashed in heavy fog and burst into flames late Monday on a highway in northwestern Russia, just short of a runway whose high-intensity lights had failed, killing 44 people, officials said. Eight people survived the crash.

The Tu-134 plane, belonging to the RusAir airline, was en route from Moscow to the city of Petrozavodsk, an Emergencies Ministry spokeswoman, Oksana Semyonova, told The Associated Press.

Her ministry said in a website statement that 44 people were killed. Eight survivors, including a 10-year-old boy and a female flight attendant, were hospitalized in critical condition in Petrozavodsk.

Semyonova said the plane went down on its final approach to the airport in Petrozavodsk, making a crash landing about a mile short of the runway, breaking apart and then bursting into flames. It was unclear if the plane had attempted to land on the road, or just happened to fall there, she said. Petrozavodsk is in Karelia province, near the Finnish border, about 400 miles northwest of Moscow.

Arrow Down

US: City Flushes 8M Gallons After Man Caught Urinating in Reservoir

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© unknown
Because a 21-year-old man was caught on a security camera urinating into a city reservoir, Oregon's biggest city is sending 8 million gallons of treated drinking water down the drain.

Portland officials defended the decision Monday, saying they didn't want to send city residents water laced, however infinitesimally, with urine.

Public health officials say, however, that urine is sterile in healthy people and that the urine in the reservoir was so diluted - perhaps a half pint in millions of gallons - that it posed little risk.

Some people in the city, in the suburbs and around the world called the flush an overreaction, especially since animals such as ducks contribute waste routinely and, sometimes, die in the water.

Bad Guys

Brazilian Soldiers and Police Raid Slums Overrun by Drug Trafficking Gangs as they Clear the Way for 2014 Football World Cup

Hundreds of Brazilian soldiers and police officers have swooped on a crime-ridden slum this morning as part of an operation to rid Rio De Janeiro of gangs ahead of the 2014 World Cup.

A group of marines, backed by helicopters and armoured vehicles, were joined by around 800 armed police and other officers during the raid in the Mangueria neighbourhood, one of Rio de Janeiro's most populous neighborhoods.

The shantytown is a key part of the city as the Maracana stadium located nearby will host both the 2014 World Cup final and the opening and closing ceremonies of the 2016 Olympic Games.

The operation is an attempt to drive from the area the drug traffickers that have held sway there for decades, Brazilian officials said.

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© Reuters
Swoop on the slums: Policemen prepare for the operation against drug dealers at Mangueira favela

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© Reuters
Bulldozing their way in: Brazilian Navy soldiers in an armoured vehicle prepare to take over the heavily populated neighbourhood in Rio de Janeiro

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© Reuters
Forcing their way in: Policeman and Brazilian Navy soldiers met little resistance as they charged into the shantytown

Handcuffs

No Automatic Right to Lawyer in US Civil Cases: Court

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Photo illustration of a courtroom in California. The US Supreme Court ruled that states did not have an automatic duty to provide counsel in civil courts in the case of a divorced father who was jailed for failing to pay child support.
The US Supreme Court ruled that states did not have an automatic duty to provide counsel in civil courts in the case of a divorced father who was jailed for failing to pay child support.

By a majority 5-4 vote, the justices found that while the South Carolina father's rights had been violated because he was not given free counsel, US states did not have to provide such advice in all civil contempt cases.

The case was being highly watched and had become emblematic of what civil rights groups have called a trend towards "debtors' prisons" in America.

In the case before the Supreme Court, Michael Turner had been ordered to pay $51.73 a week in child support. But he had regularly fallen behind, and spent short spells in prison.

On his fifth infraction, the South Carolina family court sentenced him to six months in jail. But on his release he was $5,728 in arrears, and was then sentenced to 12 months in jail.

Turner appealed arguing his constitutional rights had been violated as he had not been given access to free counsel -- as is normal in criminal cases -- to argue that he had been unable to pay the funds due during his jail term.

In Monday's majority decision, the court ruled that a constitutional amendment "does not automatically require the State to provide counsel at civil contempt proceedings to an indigent noncustodial parent who is subject to a child support order, even if that individual faces incarceration."

Heart - Black

US: Concord Dogs Killed By Poisoned Meatballs, Police Say

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© CBS
Concord Police say DJ, a black Scottish terrier (left) and Coco were poisoned with tainted meatballs
Two dogs belonging to a Concord woman were found dead after police said they ate poisoned meatballs. A disgruntled neighbor is accused in the case.

On June 4th, DJ, the woman's black Scottish terrier was suffering from seizures. Despite a visit to the vet, the dog died the same day. Two days later, the owner's second dog, Coco, died.

Tom Tarbill lives next door to the victim and believes the suspect may have gained access to his neighbor's yard through his backyard.

"I was pretty shocked," he said. "This guy, apparently, he just doesn't like dogs for one, and that kind of reflects on his character, I believe."

The owner of the dogs, who is currently out of town and did not want her identity revealed, told CBS5 by phone that she found four meatballs in her yard, and had received three threatening letters this year.

Smoking

US: Anti-Smoking Campagin Strikes Again: FDA to Issue New Graphic Cigarette Warning Labels

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© FDA
The FDA will select the graphic images to be put directly onto the cigarette packaging itself, by June 22, 2011.
Coming to a store near you: nine more reasons not to smoke.

The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday is set to release nine new graphic health warning labels for U.S. cigarette packs, representing the most significant change to cigarette packs in more than 25 years.

The new labels will take up half of a pack of cigarettes and also will appear on advertisements. Cigarette makers have until the fall of 2012 to comply.

Mandates for new warning labels were part of a 2009 law giving the FDA authority to regulate tobacco. The announcement follows reviews of scientific literature, public comments and results from a study of 36 labels proposed last November.

The U.S. first mandated warning labels in 1965. Current warning labels were put on packs in the mid-1980s.

Source: The Associated Press

Bomb

US: Evanston Man Planted Bomb, Tried to Get Reward for Tip

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© stockbyte
A 19-year-old Evanston man is accused of planting a bomb at an Evanston police station - and then calling in a tip about the device to the police and asking for a reward.

Sergio Chaves left the bomb in a garbage can outside the station at 633 Howard, next to an apartment building, officials said Monday.

The Cook County sheriff's bomb squad rendered the device safe Saturday night.

Chaves faces federal charges of attempted bombing of public safety officials, said Tom Ahern, spokesman for the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

"It put a lot of people at risk, including the three officers in the police station at the time," Ahern said.

"We believe he was acting alone," Ahern said.