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Fireball 3

Mysterious 'fireball' streaks across Oregon sky, leaves cops scratching their heads

mystery fireball oregon
© Polk County Sheriff’s Office
Possible fireball over the Oregon Coast Mountains
Photos of what looks like a fireball falling in Polk County, Oregon, has sparked a frantic search amid reports of a plane crash. Nothing was found, however and police now believe it was a meteor. Netizens have their own ideas.

It all started on Thursday evening, when the Polk County Sheriff's Office received a 911 call alerting them about a possible plane crash in the area southwest of Polk County. The caller then sent a couple of photos that show what resembles a white streak an airplane might leave behind when going down.

Police rushed to locate the site of the reported crash, sending a helicopter to scan the wooded area in the hope of recovering some wreckage. However, the extensive search has turned up nothing, leaving police dumbfounded over what actually just whizzed above the rural area.

Comment: See the local news interview with Richard Romano here.

The American Meteor Society received two reports of fireballs over Portland, Oregon and Friday Harbor, Washington on the same day.


Meteor

'Boom!' Sonoma Valley, California residents look to skies for answer following nocturnal noises

Mystery boom in Sonoma Valley, CA
© Press Democrat (file photo)
An amateur astronomer sets up his home-made 18" Newton Reflector during the monthly public viewing night at the Ferguson Observatory in Sugarloaf Park. Though there were few reported meteors on the night of Nov. 21, many people heard distant sonic booms with no known source.
People all over Sonoma County looked up at about 7:40 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 21, when a brief series of "booms" rolled across the valleys. But there was no glow in the sky, the stars were visible in the cloudless sky. Was it thunder?

Or was it a meteor?

It may be no coincidence that the sound corresponded to a large but infrequent meteor shower, known as the Unicorn (or Monocerotids, from the constellation of its visible origin), seen only every 25 years or so - and last reported in 1995. But meteors are usually silent apparitions, fleeting and ghostly.

In social media groups, many people dialoged about the Thursday night noises. Descriptions of the noises ranged from "rumbles like thunder" to "like a limb fell on the house."

And it didn't seem to be particularly localized, but strong throughout the Sonoma Valley, in Nextdoor neighborhoods from Temelec to Denmark Street. Similar social media networks reported the noises at about the same time in Healdsburg, 25 miles away. Others on Facebook said it was heard in Sebastopol, Santa Rosa, Cloverdale, Petaluma, Napa and Marin.

Fireball 4

Meteor fireball videoed over Lake Mendota, Wisconsin

Fireball over Lake Mendota
© Madison
Did you see it?

A Sunday morning tweet from NOAA's Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies at the UW-Madison showing a meteor flashing over Lake Mendota drew a host of "oohs" and "ahhhs".

Comet 2

Gigantic, 500ft asteroid to fly past Earth on Monday & come back in 7 years

Asteroid
© A Owen / Pixabay
Traveling more than 60 times faster than a Boeing jet, a huge asteroid is on course to skirt by Earth only to return seven years later.

The space rock, called 2019 VF1, was discovered this year and will pass Earth at about 4:09am GMT on Monday.

Fireball 3

Meteor fireball lights up night sky over northern New England

Fireball Streaks Across New England Sky

Fireball streaks across New England sky
People around Greater Boston, down to Connecticut, and up into Northern New England spotted a streak of light cross the sky during the Friday evening commute.

It's what's called a "fireball."

When objects enter Earth's atmosphere, they encounter intense heat and burn up. That process creates the streak of light seen in the sky, as seen in the photo above.

While unusual, these are spotted around New England from time to time.


Fireball

Meteor fireball lights up sky in Costa Del Sol, Spain

Fireball over Costa Del Sol, Spain
© EuroWeekly
Star gazers had a treat in the early hours of today (November 20) as a slow ball of fire graced the sky above the Costa del Sol in Spain.

The impressive sight was a rock from a comet that entered the Earth's atmosphere at a speed of about 47,000 kilometres per hour at 3.48 am.

The event began at an altitude of about 81 km off the coast of Malaga. From there the fireball advanced in a northeasterly direction. It was finally extinguished at an altitude of 38 km above sea level, at a point about 78 km off the coast of Malaga and 83 km off the coast of Morocco, after a trajectory of 81 km in the atmosphere.


Comment: Another fireball was seen over Spain five days before and was filmed by the SMART project:




Fireball 2

More incoming: NASA detects three asteroids currently approaching Earth

artist meteors earth asteroids
© Pixabay
Representational image of asteroids approaching the earth
NASA's asteroid tracking system is currently monitoring three space rocks that are expected to approach Earth tomorrow, Nov. 20. According to the agency, the biggest asteroid in the group is about half as tall as the Marina Bay Sands Hotel.

The first asteroid that will visit Earth's vicinity tomorrow has been identified by NASA's Center for Near-Earth Object Studies (CNEOS) as 2019 UK6. CNEOS indicated that this asteroid is currently flying towards Earth at an average speed of almost 28,000 kilometers per hour. With an estimated diameter of 110 meters, 2019 UK6 is the biggest asteroid in the group.

Trailing behind 2019 UK6 is an asteroid known as 2019 WF. According to CNEOS, this asteroid is the fastest in the group. The agency's data indicates that 2019 WF currently flying at a velocity of about 42,000 kilometers per hour. CNEOS noted that this asteroid spans about 24 meters wide.

Telescope

They just keep coming! NASA tracking THREE asteroids headed this way, two spotted just 2 days ago

Asteroids nearing Earth
© Pixabay/Thomas Breher
NASA is currently tracking three near-Earth objects (NEOs) due to fly past the Earth on November 20. Worryingly, two of the three were only spotted this past weekend, once again raising tensions over planetary defense.

The first of Wednesday's cosmic flybys and the largest, measuring 157.5ft to 360.8ft (48 to 110 meters) across, will be asteroid 2019 UK6, which will speed past at approximately 6.20am GMT (1.20am EDT). It is 2019 UK6 we had most prior warning about, as it was first observed on October 24.

NEO 2019 UK6 is an Amor asteroid, which that goes around the Sun and the Earth, occasionally, but very rarely, crossing Earth's path. Apollo asteroids, on the other hand, intersect with Earth's orbit as the planet travels around the Sun.

Comment: See also: Something Wicked This Way Comes


Fireball 5

Kilkenny, Ireland early risers spot giant meteor fireball in the frosty sky

Fireball (stock)
© TravelLife/Shutterstock
Stock image
A giant fireball was spotted streaking over Kilkenny's frosty sky early this morning.

Some reports are saying it was a meteorite, while some claim it landed in neighbouring Carlow.

At 5.20am this morning, the flashing fireball was seen by those up early for work, or those out for an early morning run. The huge fireball illuminated the frosty and foggy sky as it shot over.

A spokesperson for Astronomy Ireland confirmed the sighting but are now seeking the public's help for more information about the sighting.
Another fireball this morning over Ireland, about 5.20am. Did any of you see it?
Fireballs occur when tiny meteor enter and then burn up in the Earth's atmosphere. The last reported meteor to land in Carlow was found in Leighlinbridge in 1999.

Comet 2

Leonid meteor shower light up night sky with spectacular shooting stars

Leonid meteor shower
© Reuters / Ali jareji
One of the most famous annual meteor displays, the Leonid shower, is peaking this weekend and even though this year's show could be a downer, stargazers will still be treated to occasional spectacular fireballs and shooting stars.

The Leonid is expected to be best visible in the early hours of the morning on Monday, between 2am and 4am.