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Wildly popular Maxime Bernier is taking the Canadian election by storm

maxime bernier
© NurPhoto via Getty Images
Canada is edging closer to its federal election on Monday, with Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party and Erin O'Toole's Conservative Party in a tight race for first place. But the once fringe People's Party of Canada has emerged as a potential spoiler, riding a wave of anti-lockdown and vaccine mandate sentiment.

In 2018, after a falling out with his party and amid a backlash over statements he made about immigration and multiculturalism, then member of Parliament Maxime Bernier quit the Conservatives and formed his own federal party.

Mr Bernier, a former Canadian foreign minister, is a populist with a libertarian bent who supporters have nicknamed "Mad Max". He has previously described his upstart party, the People's Party of Canada (PPC), as a coalition of people "disenchanted with traditional politicians".

Comment: See also:


Eye 1

Italy to mandate ALL workers show 'green pass', failure to do so will result in suspension from work, fines for businesses

school italy vaccine passport
© Getty
School staff in Italy are already required to show a so-called "green pass"
Italy is to make it compulsory for all workers to have a Covid "green pass" - proof of vaccination, a negative test or recovery from the virus.

The measures are a first for Europe and some of the strictest in the world.


Comment: Italy may be 'the first' to enforce these restrictions but the threat is looming over citizens throughout the EU, however there are other countries, like Sweden and Denmark, which are in the process of dropping all restrictions.


Anyone without a pass will reportedly face suspension from work and may have their pay stopped after five days.

Comment: See also: And check out SOTT radio's: NewsReal: Covid-19/11




Chess

Biden adds measles to list of 'quarantinable' diseases after infections among Afghan refugees

afghan refugees
© Reuters / Evelyn Hockstein
President Joe Biden on Friday signed an executive order adding measles to a list of communicable diseases that could require quarantine after several Afghan refugees were diagnosed with the highly contagious disease after arriving in the United States.

The action makes measles one of the diseases for which federal health authorities have the authority to issue quarantine orders requiring people who have been diagnosed with measles or exposed to it to self-isolate to protect public health, a White House official said in a statement.

"This action was taken at the request of public health officials, who cited the cases of measles among Afghans who recently arrived in the U.S. as well as several previous outbreaks of measles in recent years," the official added, speaking on condition of anonymity.

The statement did not give details on the nature or length of the quarantine.

Bad Guys

US, UK and Australia forge military alliance, intend to antagonize and contain China

Biden boris johnson
© REUTERS/Tom Brenner
FILE PHOTO: US President Joe Biden walks to the podium before his remarks on a National Security Initiative virtually with Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, inside the East Room at the White House in Washington, US
The US, UK and Australia are setting up a trilateral security partnership aimed at confronting China, which will include helping Australia to build nuclear-powered submarines.

The initiative, called Aukus, was announced jointly by US president Joe Biden and prime ministers Boris Johnson and Scott Morrison, joined virtually by videoconference. They presented it as the next critical step in an old alliance.

Morrison said teams from the three countries would draw up a joint plan over the coming 18 months for assembling the new Australian nuclear-powered submarine fleet, which will be built in Adelaide. The project will make Australia only the seventh country in the world to have submarines propelled by nuclear reactors.

Comment: RT reports that the UK defense minister claims that sidelining the French is not a 'bretrayal':
The agreement comes at the expense of Naval Group, whose 2016 deal with Australia will now be thrown out. It will be the first time the UK and US, both of which have operated nuclear submarines for decades, have shared nuclear technology for military purposes with Canberra.

"I understand France's disappointment on its industrial contract," but this is not a "betrayal," Wallace told the BBC, confirming that he had already spoken with his French counterparts. Naval Group's deal to build diesel-power vessels for Australia was reportedly worth $40 billion.

Wallace said the deal would be worth a considerable amount to the British economy, echoing PM Boris Johnson's talk of "levelling up" during his Wednesday night press conference with US President Joe Biden and Australian PM Scott Morrison.

"There will be a boost for the British defence industry in this collaboration because we have sub-systems that Australia doesn't have that we will be able to offer into that," Wallace told the BBC.


Indeed it will. The average citizen will not see any of the benefits.


On Thursday, French Armed Forces Minister Florence Parly said the government will look to limit the financial damage to Naval Group following the contract's cancellation and refused to rule out seeking compensation from Australia."We are studying all avenues," Parly told French radio station RFI. The Naval Group contract had been personally backed by French President Emmanuel Macron, although it is understood that complications had arisen in the past few years.

Wallace told Sky News on Thursday that the pact was looking to safeguard against a number of threats, dismissing the notion that it was aimed solely at China. He explained that nuclear submarines were harder to detect and don't need to resurface.


He's probably telling the truth, because the West is actively antagonising Russia, too.


France mulling compensation claim

naval workers
© REUTERS/Benoit Tessier
FILE PHOTO of Naval Group workers
Hurel said that some 500 Naval Group employees were involved in the "Australia program," adding he did not believe they should foot the bill for the Australian decision, suggesting the cost lies firmly with Canberra.

French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian didn't hold back, telling FranceInfo: "I am angry and bitter. This isn't done between allies." He added that it was "brutal, unilateral and unpredictable decision [which] reminds me a lot of what Mr [Donald] Trump used to do."

The UK, whose military industry stands to gain substantially from the new deal, claimed the move was not a "betrayal" of France, though defense secretary Ben Wallace said he understood why the French would be disappointed.
See also:


Info

Trump voices support for Saturday's pro-Capitol riots rally

Donald Trump
© Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Comment: What a disingenuous title. "Pro-Capitol riots"? Even if the editors can't accept that the January 6th incident at the Capitol wasn't a riot, surely they can see that Trump obviously doesn't think it was and therefore isn't "pro-riot".


Former President Trump on Thursday expressed solidarity with people facing prosecution in connection to the Capitol insurrection.

The statement was issued ahead of Saturday's rally to protest the treatment of Capitol rioters. Over 600 known federal defendants face charges related to the Jan. 6 insurrection.

Rioters committed over 1,000 assaults against police officers, according to prosecutors.

Comment: It seems the mainstream narrative about what happened on January 6th shows no sign of reaching common sense. There's nothing wrong with Trump supporting a rally in support of fair treatment for those who have been prosecuted for what more or less amounts to being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

See also:


Bullseye

Social Justice and the Emergence of Covid Tyranny

opening door
Signs of incipient totalitarian impulses have been evident since the rise of political correctness.1 Yet, warnings from those who saw the character of contemporary "social justice" went largely unheeded. Nevertheless, even before degenerating into "wokeness," social justice bore the seeds of civilizational decline and the simultaneous rise of social and political tyranny. The weaponization of mostly feigned fragility by snowflake totalitarians has been marshaled to abrogate the rights of those deemed offensive, injurious, and even "dangerous." It also has evinced "paralogistic discourse," or "[d]iscourse that is out of touch with reality, involving illogical, fallacious, unwarranted premises and conclusions."2 Such thinking is characteristic of societal hysteria.3 This weaponization escalated, germinating "cancel culture," the buds from which neo-Stalinist purges have since blossomed.

As I was first to point out, social justice amounts to "practical postmodernism."4 The relativism, subjectivism, and antiobjectivity of postmodern theory, as well as the priority it places on language, have been harnessed by social justice activists and their followers and put to political ends. Social justice ideology claims that "narratives," "my truth," and language trump or produce reality. In terms of transgender ideology, this means that declaring one's gender, or mere (re)naming, supersedes and cancels biology. In terms of critical race theory and the Black Lives Matter movement, it means that personal stories of oppression overwrite evidence, statistics, and the arc of history. Given that appeals to objective criteria are banished, when backed by the requisite power, such claims are necessarily authoritarian. Without objective criteria, there is no court of appeal other than power, and thus such "truths" are deemed incontrovertible.5 The legal ramifications of practical postmodernism have been nothing less than astonishing.

The policies of so-called diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) accelerated the already prevalent upward movement of unqualified persons, those who have achieved important positions thanks to affirmative action and adherence to political ideology. DEI (or DIE) metastasized throughout the culture at large, with signs of the upward mobility of the unqualified seen in government, academia, and the corporate world. On Twitter, the accounts of unremarkable activists and otherwise unaccomplished leftists are granted the official blue checkmark of authority and significance.

Historically, the upward movement of the unqualified has been a harbinger of increasing authoritarianism; the unqualified favor authoritarianism, which protects their unearned status, and authoritarianism selects the unqualified, who become avid loyalists of the authoritarian regime.6 Thus, the upward movement of the unqualified should be taken as a telltale sign.

Comment: For more on Political Ponerology see:


Beaker

A bodyguard of secrets: Novichok secret paralyzes British doctors following German doctors' disclosure

Hippocrates
The leading hospital doctors on Novichok poisoning in Britain and Germany are not allowed by their governments to reveal publicly the medical information they have exchanged with each other.

James Haslam, the chief doctor at Salisbury District Hospital treating Sergei Skripal and Yulia Skripal for Novichok poisoning in March 2018, and Elspeth Hulse, an anaesthetist at Newcastle upon Tyne hospital and co-author with Haslam of a medical research paper on the Skripal case, refused this week to say if they participated with German doctors in the treatment of Alexei Navalny for Novichok poisoning at Charité Hospital in Berlin in August 2020.

Attention

The four biggest problems with Biden's vaccine order

Biden
© Flickr/LBJ Library/Public Domain
US President Joe Biden
Back in December of 2020, then President-elect Biden said that he would not make vaccines against COVID-19 mandatory, nor did he think they should be mandatory. Given the new vaccine mandate by the White House, set to affect nearly 100 million Americans by some estimates, one reasonably conclude that Biden misled the people. However, Biden's actions will likely increase vaccine hesitancy, lead to further distrust of the government, and can expect multiple legal challenges - as well as civil disobedience.

These outcomes can all be expected due to four distinct challenges to the mandate.

1. Disregard for Congress and the Constitution

First, Biden's executive order is just that - an executive order. Congress, the legislative branch, and thus the entire concept of representative government, has been bypassed by President Biden. The White House has no legislative authority to create an emergency rule under OSHA and it says as much in the U.S. Constitution. Article 1, Section 1 states very plainly, in a single sentence:
"All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives."
Nowhere in that sentence are legislative authorities granted to the Executive branch. Likewise, the President does not reserve such powers - powers which belong to the states or to the people, as outlined by the Tenth Amendment in the Bill of Rights.

Comment: The push-back is revving up as many states are in uproar over Biden's stance:
Twenty-seven Republican governors or attorneys general have vowed to fight the latest executive order issued by President Joe Biden mandating that over 80 million private employees receive COVID vaccinations or undergo weekly testing, or their employer will be fined.

The governors who've expressed opposition include those from Arizona, Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

Republican attorneys general from states with Democratic governors who also vowed to fight include Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron and Louisiana AG Jeff Landry.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, with whom Biden has sparred over mask mandates and vaccine passports, said Florida would fight back:
"When you have a president like Biden issuing unconstitutional edicts against the American people, we have a responsibility to stand up for the Constitution and to fight back, and we are doing that in the state of Florida," he said. "This is a president who has acknowledged in the past he does not have the authority to force this on anybody, and this order would result potentially in millions of Americans losing their jobs."
Texas, which is already embroiled in several lawsuits with the Biden administration, vowed to sue. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said after hearing Biden's announcement that
"Texas is already working to halt this power grab" and Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said Texas would be suing the Biden administration "very soon."
Missouri Gov. Mike Parson said,
"OSHA cannot dictate personal health care decisions for Missourians. Missouri is not under an OSHA state plan, and Parson will not allow state employees to be used to enforce this unconstitutional action."
South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster vowed to fight Biden, saying,
"The American Dream has turned into a nightmare under President Biden and the radical Democrats. They have declared war against capitalism, thumbed their noses at the Constitution, and empowered our enemies abroad. Rest assured, we will fight them to the gates of hell to protect the liberty and livelihood of every South Carolinian."
Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey said,
"Governors don't report to Joe Biden. Governors don't report to the federal government, the states created the federal government, and Joe Biden has stepped out of his reach. These mandates are outrageous. They will never stand up in court. We must and will push back."
Indiana Attorney General Todd Rokita indicated he was working with a group of AGs to file a lawsuit.
"My team and I, along with other like-minded attorneys general, are reviewing all legal action on how to stand against these authoritarian actions by the Biden administration."
In response to Republican pushback, White House senior adviser Cedric Richmond, a former Democratic congressman from Louisiana, told CNN the White House expected the opposition.
"... those governors that stand in the way, I think, it was very clear from the president's tone today that he will run over them. And it is important. It's not for political purposes. It's to save the lives of American people. And so, we won't let one or two individuals stand in the way. We will always err on the side of protecting the American people."
What will be Biden's move?
And...Biden will attempt to implement the employer vaccine mandate and punishments through an Emergency Temporary Standard (ETS). Think of this as a temporary measure that allows the agency to bypass normal rulemaking and regulatory procedures. The ETS is governed by 29 USC 655, which states:
ETS rule
Look closely at part (A), which requires the Secretary of Labor to determine that
"employees are exposed to grave danger from exposure to substances or agents determined to be toxic or physically harmful or from new hazards."
How has OSHA determined ALL large employers are exposing their employees to "grave danger"?

Here's the answer: they haven't. And they don't think they have to. In using the ETS - which are temporary - the Biden Administration is bypassing statutory and caselaw requirements that govern permanent health and safety standards.

Think of that for a moment: that they wish to use temporary regulations to mandate permanent vaccines.
Vaccine related info



Star of David

Israel is ramping up and manipulating Iran-US tensions again in order to stop a new nuclear deal

Bennett
© Reuters
Israeli PM Naftali Bennett
After the IAEA struck a breakthrough agreement with Iran last weekend, Israel quickly sought to escalate tensions by accusing Iranian-backed forces of using drones to attack US forces in Iraq.

Perhaps the most positive sign since the inauguration of Iran's new President Ebrahim Raisi, came on Sunday with a new IAEA-Iran agreement. Following a snap visit by the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Rafael Mariano Grossi, Tehran agreed to allow the watchdog group to service cameras monitoring Iran's nuclear facilities.

This step sparked speculation that Iran was posturing towards renewing talks with international partners to re-enter the nuclear deal. However the positive energy was quickly skewered by Israel's Minister of Defense, Benny Gantz, who delivered a speech the same day claiming that:
"Terrorists from Yemen, Iraq, Syria and Lebanon are receiving training on how to operate Iran-made drones in the Kashan Base north of Isfahan. Kashan is leading Iran's export of aerial terrorism in the region."
On Saturday, according to Kurdish Security Forces in Northern Iraq, drone strikes had targeted Erbil airport, a site which hosts US forces. Drone attacks of this nature earlier this year sparked two separate US attacks on the Iraqi Popular Mobilisation Units (PMU) in both Iraq and Syria. Although no evidence has been brought to bear as to who was behind the various drone strikes on US forces, US media and the Biden administration have regularly blamed the Iranian-backed PMU.

Light Sabers

Friction among Taliban pragmatists, hard-liners intensifies

Baradar
© Reuters
Abdul Ghani Baradar
Friction between pragmatists and ideologues in the Taliban leadership has intensified since the group formed a hard-line Cabinet last week that is more in line with their harsh rule in the 1990s than their recent promises of inclusiveness, said two Afghans familiar with the power struggle.

The wrangling has taken place behind the scenes, but rumors quickly began circulating about a recent violent confrontation between the two camps at the presidential palace, including claims that the leader of the pragmatic faction, Abdul Ghani Baradar, was killed.

The rumors reached such intensity that an audio recording and handwritten statement, both purportedly by Baradar himself, denied he had been killed. The Pashto-language letter had a stamp from the office of Baradar, who had served as the chief negotiator during talks between the Taliban and the United States. Those negotiations had paved the way for the U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan, which was completed in late August, two weeks after the Taliban overran the capital of Kabul.

Shortly after the Kabul takeover, Baradar had been the first senior Taliban official to hold out the possibility of an inclusive government, but such hopes were disappointed with the formation of an all-male, all-Taliban lineup last week.

Comment: Hopefully, what is important will remain and what is not will sift out as Afghanistan begins the giant task of governing a broken country that suffered decades of fighting, occupation, contention and deception.