Baphomet statue
© JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Baphomet statue is seen in the conversion room at the Satanic Temple. The Satanic Temple opened up an abortion clinic in New Mexico.
Cosmopolitan, a popular magazine for young women, shared with readers how they could have a ritualized abortion service via an abortion facility named after Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito's mother.

Cosmopolitan explained on its Instagram page on Nov. 16 about the process of having a Satanic-themed abortion. It specifically addressed a "ceremonial" service provided at the "Samuel Alito's Mom's Satanic Abortion Clinic," named as an insult to Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito.

"What's it like to have a Satanic abortion? For Jessica* [a fake name to keep the woman anonymous], a 37-year-old mother of three who received abortion medication via Samuel Alito's Mom's Satanic Clinic, 'the experience was just very supportive,'" Cosmopolitan wrote in an Instagram post. "While she's not a Satanist, Jessica decided to incorporate a few ceremonial elements into her solo abortion experience. 'Why not?' she thought. The overall messaging just clicked with her."

The post shared a series of slides elaborating on the steps of how to have a ritualized abortion ceremony as prescribed by The Satanic Temple. This included steps such as staring at one's reflection before taking an abortion pill and saying, "One's body is inviolable, subject to one's own will alone."

The ritual is later concluded by declaring, "By my body, my blood; by my will, it is done."

The slides also attest one can "include as many loved ones as they'd like" in the ceremony and "light candles or even dress up — whatever makes them feel empowered."

Shortly before that post, Cosmopolitan had shared an article about the Satanic abortion clinic, speculating on an alternate timeline where the mother of Alito had chosen abortion instead of birthing him.

"But what if her circumstances had been different — if her own life had been endangered by the pregnancy or if the fetus had a fatal anomaly or if Rose simply hadn't been ready for a child? What if she'd had a choice and access to safe, legal abortion care?" the magazine asked. "Nearly 75 years later, in a reproductive rights landscape that feels like it's sliding back in time, one group decided to channel this policy fantasy into a new health care enterprise named in her honor."

The premise of this clinic, as Cosmopolitan described, is to use religion as a means to protect abortion rights.

Christmas tree Satanic temple
© Fox News DigitalIn this photo illustration, the Satanic temple in Wisconsin was featured in a Christmas tree display from a local museum.
"By TST's accounting, no other faith-based group in the U.S. has ever launched an abortion clinic," the magazine noted. "And that's the game-changing twist here: Unlike other abortion-pill-by-mail providers like Hey Jane or Abuzz, TST is a religion. Meaning its patients, who don't have to be Satanists themselves, are participating in a religious ritual."

The publication added: "That's a key legal distinction TST hopes to leverage in its historic push to expand its clinic model beyond New Mexico — into states where abortion is otherwise banned."

Cosmopolitan did not immediately respond to FOX News Digital's request for comment.