James Quincy
© Screenshot/Ben Franske/KJN
Coca-Cola CEO James Quincy
Coke got woke, and now they're gonna go broke.

I don't know why these companies literally can't stop themselves from jumping into social and political issues. It's like, you make fizzy sugar water, shut up. But much like sports and Hollywood, these progressive corporate commies just can't stop themselves from giving their unsolicited two cents.

Everyone's a friggen activist nowadays. And it's not like going "woke" is this super-profitable gig for most companies and sports franchises. Hollywood is quite literally circling the drain as we speak - there are more people in my living room right now than actual viewers who watch their narcissistic awards shows, and the ratings for sports are on their second flush as well.

Even so, companies like Coke and Apple, and about a bazillion others, decided to chime in on the new voter integrity laws in Georgia...

A bunch of soft drink executives, who didn't read the bill, hop on the wave of outrage in order to score some quick progressive brownie points, not realizing the wave won't last - it's gonna hit the shore and crash within days, and they'll be left standing there with a brand that's destroyed and customers who are pissed.

And that's exactly where Coke is right now. They're on the shore sinking in the wet sand because they didn't realize that 75+million Americans want their voice and their vote to matter, and a vast majority of ALL Americans want voter ID, including blacks.

Now what, Coke?

So, getting all SJW and political isn't a smart gig when the vast majority of the country is sitting back looking at this circus unfold and thinking everyone involved has some type of personality disorder or emotional imbalance.

Well, now the back-peddling begins.

Suddenly "loud and proud" woke Coke is much mellower - kind of like a glass of soda that's lost its fizz - and now they're offering up a much more "conciliatory" tone about voting. In other words, they caved to the tremendous backlash from conservatives after President Trump called on his supporters to boycott the soda company and all the woke corps who butted into something that was none of their business.

If you'll recall, when this all started Coke CEO James Quincey put out a very strong statement - he sounded like a full-blown Dem activist, for crying out loud.
"We want to be crystal clear and state unambiguously that we are disappointed in the outcome of the Georgia voting legislation."
Crystal clear...he wasn't mincing words, and he capped that off by going on CNBC, where he called the law "unacceptable" and a "step backward."

Well, James didn't leave much wiggle room for interpretation. He was quite clear on where he stood and it was with the communist Dems and their rigged elections.

But that tone has changed. A lot.

Here's what Coke just said to Washington Examiner in a statement about voting rights:
"We believe the best way to make progress now is for everyone to come together to listen, respectfully share concerns and collaborate on a path forward. We remain open to productive conversations with advocacy groups and lawmakers who may have differing views. It's time to find common ground. In the end, we all want the same thing - free and fair elections, the cornerstone of our democracy."
Clearly, this is a far cry from the tone they had just a couple of weeks ago - a far, far cry.

They're waving the white flag. I guess the silent majority, got loud and Coke had to listen.

But the bigger question still remains: why on earth is a soft drink company discussing voting at all? Why do we now have to contend with corporations who know literally nothing about laws, voting, or local politics, pop off constantly about things that do not concern them.

This virtue signaling and pandering for progressive accolades from a small minority of very loud-mouth people is stomach-turning.

We didn't elect coke, and they're not registered as a SuperPac for Dems (yet), so why are they even involved in this?

Shut up, and make your carbonated corn syrup drink, and allow the people we elected and who represent us to deal with these issues.

None of us need a can of cruddy Coke determining our future.