wales coronaviru
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Wales has banned people on public transport from chatting on the phone, reading newspapers, or eating and drinking while on public trains and buses
Wales has banned people on public transport from chatting on the phone, reading newspapers, or eating and drinking while on public trains and buses.

In the Welsh government's guidance for restarting public transport, published earlier this week, a number of new measures have been introduced including 'no "loud" activities in public transport (like singing)'.

It also bans the use of mobile phones for calls on public transport unless in the case of an emergency. Both of these measures are in place in order to 'reduce potential aerosol transmission' of the virus.

The guidelines also state that people should not run for the bus or inside train stations in case of spreading the virus and bus drivers are instead instructed to wait for anyone who may be attempting to get the bus before driving off.

Food and drink is not allowed to be consumed on public transport except for on medical grounds and the guidelines state: 'No newspapers.'

The strict rules were issued under the sub-heading 'administrative controls' as 'additional mitigations in public transport where two-metre physical distancing is difficult or not possible'.

Operators were told they could bring them into force from July 13, on top of current restrictions including requiring all passengers to wear a face mask.

The Welsh government said they were about 'taking every possible precaution' as 'there is clear evidence coronavirus can spread through aerosol transmission - when people are talking loudly, eating or even breathing heavily after running for the bus'.
Wales coronavirus
© Rex
You can take your phone with you when you travel in Wales, but calls aren't allowed as they may spread the virus
Anyone using public transport in Wales - including taxis - will be asked to wear three-layer face coverings from July 27.

It is not clear how the changes will be enforced, or whether there will be any fines imposed for those failing to follow restrictions.

Transport for Wales urged passengers not to use its services except for essential travel earlier this month, as households were allowed to form an 'exclusive bubble' with one other household for the first time.

They said that this was due to the expected increase in the number of journeys and to ensure there was enough space for key workers or those without alternative options.

TfW's CEO, James Price, said: 'The safety of our colleagues and customers has, and will always be, our top priority. 'We need to re-inforce our travel safer campaign highlighting that public transport is for essential travel and where there are no other travel alternatives.'