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Sun, 28 Nov 2021
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Volcanoes

Seismograph

Strongest earthquake since volcano erupted shakes La Palma island - 4.5 magnitude

Lava cascades from Spain's Cumbre Vieja volcano

Lava cascades from Spain's Cumbre Vieja volcano
A 4.5-magnitude earthquake shook La Palma in Spain's Canary Islands in what was the strongest recorded temblor since volcanic eruptions began 26 days ago, authorities said Thursday.

The quake was one of around 60 recorded overnight, Spain's National Geographic Institute said, as the Cumbre Vieja volcano continued to spew fiery rivers of lava that are destroying everything in their path and dumping molten rock into the Atlantic Ocean.

The lava has partially or completely destroyed more than 1,600 buildings, about half of them houses, officials said, though prompt evacuations have so far prevented any deaths. Around 7,000 people have had to abandon their homes, 300 of them Thursday.

Attention

Yellowstone volcano rocked by 283 earthquakes as USGS probes "ongoing" swarm of tremors

Yellowstone methane
© CC0 / Pixabay
Stretching over the states of Wyoming, Idaho and Montana, the Yellowstone National Park is one of the US's most seismically active regions. Yellowstone Park is home to the Yellowstone volcano caldera, which has formed during the course of multiple cataclysmic eruptions in the last 3.1 million years. And although there has been no significant volcanism at the park in some 70,000 years, Yellowstone continues to be rocked by thousands of earthquakes every single year.

According to the latest report published by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO) branch of the USGS, September was no exception to the rule.


Comment: Except that the quake swarms and other unusual activity around Yellowstone breaks the 'rule'.


Seismograph stations dotted around the park tracked and continue to track some 283 earthquakes in the month of September.

Comment: Taken together, it's beginning to look like USGS doth protest too much, and that may partly be because the Yellowstone threat is greater than previously thought.


Seismograph

La Palma eruption spits out volcanic bombs, shuts airport again, authorities on high alert

La Palma
© AP Photo/Daniel Roca
Smoke rises on the horizon as lava flows from a volcano on the Canary island of La Palma, Spain on Wednesday Oct. 6, 2021. A volcano that has destroyed nearly 1,000 buildings on a Spanish island increased its explosive power, roaring louder and spewing thicker lava flowing out of its main vent. The eruption started on Sept. 19 and has forced the evacuation of over 6,000 residents of the island of La Palma.
The airport on the Spanish island of La Palma shut down again Thursday due to ashfall from a volcano that has been erupting for almost three weeks.

Scientists said the course of the eruption was unpredictable. It settled down in recent days, but the volcano in the Canary Islands continues to spew lava, and 16 earthquakes of up to magnitude 3.5 shook the area over the previous 24 hours, the National Geographic Institute said.

The lava has forced the evacuation of more than 6,000 people and destroyed more than 600 houses. The ash cloud temporarily closed La Palma Airport last month.

Comment: It's looking increasingly likely that this worldwide uptick in seismic and volcanic activity - amongst other extreme weather phenomena - isn't going to abate any time soon. Notably, it reflects the chaos bubbling under the surface on the global societal level: Also check out SOTT radio's:


Attention

Sabancaya Volcano in Peru spews continuous ash emissions to 24,000 ft

Sabancaya Volcano
Explosive activity continues. Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) Buenos Aires warned about a volcanic ash plume that rose up to estimated 24000 ft (7300 m) altitude or flight level 240 and is moving at 15 kts in N direction.


The full report is as follows:

Red Flag

Largest underwater eruption makes new volcano bigger than Empire State Building

A stock photo showing lava pouring
© EVAN AUSTEN/GETTY
A stock photo showing lava pouring into the ocean at Kīlauea Volcanic eruption in Hawaii on the Big Island, unrelated to the underwater volcano. Scientists have recorded the largest underwater volcanic eruption of lava, which created a new volcano on the seafloor in the Indian Ocean.
The largest underwater eruption ever recorded has created a volcano on the seafloor that is 2,690 feet tall.

The volcano, which is twice as tall as the Empire State Building, was not present off the eastern coast of the island of Mayotte in the Indian Ocean before an earthquake shook the island 2018.

The underwater seismic event generated over 11,000 detectable earthquakes in what the authors of a Nature paper documenting it describes as a "major magmatic event." The event, which caused the deformation of the seafloor was so great it was registered beyond the Indian Ocean and around the globe.

"Volcanic eruptions shape Earth's surface and provide a window into deep Earth processes," the authors said. "This is the largest active submarine eruption ever documented."

Fire

Explosion at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico

Popocatépetl
A cloud obscured explosion at 02:58 CDT. Thanks for watching!!


Fire

La Palma volcano: Third fissure erupts after 8 new earthquakes

A satellite image of the lava flow on the island of La Palma taken before the eruption of a third fissure.
© Copernicus Sentinel-2 Imagery
A satellite image of the lava flow on the island of La Palma taken before the eruption of a third fissure.
An erupting volcano in the Canary Islands has blown open a third fissure - sending a fresh river of lava down the mountainside.

It came as authorities recorded eight new earthquakes up to magnitude 3.5 on the island of La Palma on Friday.

They are now waiting to see whether lava from the new fissure - which burst open around 400m to the north of original eruption site - will join the main flow from the Cumbre Vieja volcano range, which has reached the Atlantic Ocean.



Fire

Kilauea volcano erupts on Hawaii's Big Island

About 28 minutes into Wednesday’s eruption
© USGS
About 28 minutes into Wednesday’s eruption
The Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island has erupted after hours of increased activity, according to officials at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The alert level has been raised to the highest level but there is no immediate threat to populated areas.

The eruption began at about 3:20 p.m. on Wednesday when the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) detected a glow while looking at webcam images from the volcano's summit. Lava became visible a short time later and the eruption appeared to intensify around 7 p.m.

The eruption is taking place within the Halemaʻumaʻu crater in Kīlauea's summit caldera, which is part of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, according to an advisory from the USGS, which raised the volcano's alert level to the highest level.


Fire

Airport closed as La Palma volcano eruption intensifies

Airport closed as La Palma volcano eruption intensifies
© Thomson Reuters
Airport closed as La Palma volcano eruption intensifies
Volcanic explosions spewed red hot lava high into the air on La Palma on Saturday as a new emission vent opened, forcing the small Spanish island to close its airport and preventing some people leaving.

The Cumbre Vieja volcano, which began erupting last Sunday, is entering a new explosive phase. The Canary Islands Volcanology Institute, Involcan, said the new emission vent that had opened was to the west of the principle vent.

Spanish airport operator Aena said the island's airport had been closed because of the volcano, which has spewed out thousands of tons of lava, destroyed hundreds of houses and forced the evacuation of nearly 6,000 people.

"La Palma airport is inoperative due to ash accumulation. Cleaning tasks have started, but the situation may change at any time," it tweeted.


Attention

Fuego volcano in Guatemala erupts

erupts
The Fuego volcano in Guatemala, one of the most active in Central America, entered the eruption phase this Thursday, local authorities reported.

According to preliminary reports, the eruption "produced the descent of pyroclastic flows towards the Ceniza gorge", and is also expected to affect the Trinidad gorge. Photos and videos are already circulating on social networks that show a dense column of gases and ash near the volcano, located about 45 kilometers west of the Guatemalan capital.

The bulletin of the National Coordinator for Disaster Reduction of Guatemala (CONRED) details that the main communities affected by the ash fall are Panimache I and II, Morelia, El Porvenir, Santa Sofía, Sangre de Cristo and San Pedro Yepocapa.