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Fri, 23 Feb 2018
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Fireballs

Fireball 4

A large fluorescent green trail above France

meteorite, fireball
© Jon Burnett
Question asked on 26-11-2017 by FONTENEAU Bernard, from 85500 les HERBIERS and answered by Thibaut Alexandre

- Yesterday morning at the Herbiers in the Vendée, at around 8:45 a. m., I saw a great green fluorescent train located North-West, going from the North and going down to the West, it only lasted a fraction of a second... It looked like a fireworks trail, but very high in the sky and almost parallel to the horizon line...

- Hello Bernard, and thank you very much for your testimony. According to the description, you had the chance to observe a daytime fireball. It so happens that there was one of them observed in the North-West of France this Saturday morning, around 8:15 am. I think it's about this one.

Translation : Sott

Fireball 2

Mysterious fireball shedding burning sparks filmed blazing across sky in Saskatchewan, Canada

Dallas Bitternose filmed the bright light

Dallas Bitternose filmed the bright light
A mysterious fireball spotted blazing across the night sky with burning sparks falling off it has left locals baffled.

Incredible footage of the bright light was captured after it was seen across several locations in Saskatchewan and Alberta in Canada last night.

Videos shared on social media shows the unidentified object glowing against the pitch black sky.

Dallas Bitternose was outside his house in Saskatchewan when he noticed the mystery blaze coming from the west before midnight.

He initially thought it could be a satellite or a plane coming down, sparking as it dropped.


Fireball

Seasons Greetings: Three-mile-wide Asteroid 3200 Phaethon to skim Earth just before Christmas (VIDEO)

An artist’s impression of a massive space rock zooming near Earth (Picture: Science Photo Library/Getty)
© Science Photo Library/Getty
An artist’s impression of a massive space rock zooming near Earth
Planet Earth will have a terrifyingly close encounter with a three-mile-wide asteroid just over a week before Christmas.

A gigantic space rock called 3200 Phaethon is due to brush 'quite close' to our planet on December 17, Russian astronomers have revealed.

This huge asteroid is thought to cause the beautiful Geminids meteor shower which will take place between December 13 and 14, causing hundreds of bright meteors to illuminate the night sky as they burn up in Earth's atmosphere.


But NASA has also described it as a 'potentially hazardous asteroid whose path misses Earth's orbit by only 2 million miles' - which is tiny in galactic terms.


Comment: In light of recent news this is concerning, and due to the cyclical nature of these events, if not now then in the coming years: BOOM! Mysterious blasts rattling the skies are on the increase around the world - UPDATE at least 64 documented events (VIDEO)


It's about half the size of Chicxulub, the rock which wiped out the dinosaurs, and has a very unusual orbit which causes it to pass closer to the sun than any other named asteroid.


Fireball 4

Meteor fireball spotted over the Jersey Shore and nearby states

fireball
© NASA stock image
If you saw a vivid object race across the Jersey Shore sky early Friday evening, you're not alone.

More than 20 spotters reported seeing a fireball across portions of the Mid-Atlantic, according to a reporting log on the American Meteor Society website.

"Please tell me someone else saw the huge fireball streaking east to west across the sky south of Toms River a few minutes ago," Nick Cittadino posted on Jersey Shore Hurricane News at 6:30 p.m. Friday.

It was also spotted in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina.


Fireball 4

Green meteor fireball seen over New South Wales, Australia

Fireball over NSW
© Lawana Hillhouse
Speculation ran rife online after Inverell Times reader Lawana Hillhouse reported seeing a strange light moving over the town on Thursday night, November 23, at approximately 9.45pm.

"It was sort of round and real red," Lawana said. She watched the object, which she initially believed was a fireball, move at a medium pace towards Moree.

"I thought it was some sort of weird weather event," she said.

Meteors, ball lightning, burning space junk and even aliens were among the many possible explanations given, as the Higgins Storm Chasing website reported similar sightings across NSW between 9.30-11pm.

Fireball 2

Blue-green meteor shoots across East Iceland skies

Village of Breiðdalsvík
© Steinunn Ásmundsdóttir
The tiny village of Breiðdalsvík in the East Fjords. The lights were seen just above the rocks at the back of the photograph.
Locals of Breiðdalsvík in East Iceland wondered if the aliens were actually coming on Tuesday when they were surprised by strange lights shooting across the sky.

According to local paper Austurfrétt the blue-green light shot across the sky at an incredible speed. One of the witnesses was Hrafnkell Hannesson who says he was at the supermarket when the lights appeared.

Fireball 2

Geminid meteor shower: how to watch as Phaethon asteroid debris lights up Earth's skies

A view of the Geminid meteor shower Asim Patel/Wikimedia
© Asim Patel/Wikimedia
A view of the Geminid meteor shower
Photographers and sky-watchers will be treated to an awe-inspiring celestial display in December as the Geminid meteor shower lights up Earth's atmosphere.

As our planet moves through the debris field left by the Phaethon asteroid next month, flashes and trails of light will be visible overhead - as long as the weather is clear.


Phaethon, named for the son of Greek god Helios, is a rocky asteroid that orbits the Sun unusually closely.

Fireball 2

Flashing meteor fireball streaks through Japan's night sky (VIDEOS)

fireball
A blazing object believed to be a large meteor whizzed through the night sky over Japan on Nov. 21.

It was visible for a few seconds around 9:30 p.m. and flashed with intense light a few times before vanishing, witnesses said.

The stunning display sparked an explosion of activity on social media.

"It's a fireball ... a big meteor," said Chisato Yamauchi, 43, a researcher at Misato astronomical observatory in Wakayama Prefecture, who watched video footage of the event online.

"Fragments of sand and stone moving through space lit up due to friction upon entering Earth's atmosphere," he explained.


Fireball 4

Bright green meteor fireball captured on camera over Oostkapelle, the Netherlands

green fireball
© Klaas Jobse
On the night of November 19th, amateur astronomer Klaas Jobse captured a green meteor/fireball over the Dutch village of Oostkapelle.

Estimating the size of the fragment as that of a large marble, Jobse told regional broadcaster Omroep Zeeland that "such a fragment of a comet enters the atmosphere with a gigantic speed and then a spectacular reaction occurs, with this fireball as a result."

While he suspects the meteor fragment originates from the Leonids, he remarked that a great fireball such as this one is extraordinary. "It was pretty clear, so you could see it beautifully. And it was very bright. I think you can compare it with the light of a full moon. Yes, for an amateur astronomer, this is the icing on the cake."

See the footage of the fireball in the video below (00:11-00:15):


Fireball

'Oumuamua' - Definitely not your average asteroid or comet

Oumuamua
© SpaceRef
Oumuamua.
In October astronomers were surprised by a visitor that came racing into our Solar System from interstellar space. Now, researchers using the Gemini Observatory have determined that the first known object to graze our Solar System from beyond is similar to, but definitely not, your average asteroid or comet. "This thing is an oddball," said Karen Meech of the University of Hawaii's Institute for Astronomy who leads an international team studying this interstellar interloper.

Originally denoted A2017 U1, the body now goes by the Hawaiian name 'Oumuamua, in part because of its discovery by Meech's team using the Pan-STARRS1 survey telescope on Haleakala in Hawai'i. When discovered in mid-October 'Oumuamua was only about 85 times the Earth-Moon distance away and its discovery was announced in early November.

Since its discovery 'Oumuamua has faded from view. The object's rapidly increasing distance from the Earth and Sun now makes it too faint to be studied by even the largest telescopes.

"Needless to say, we dropped everything so we could quickly point the Gemini telescopes at this object immediately after its discovery," said Gemini Director Laura Ferrarese who coordinated the Gemini South observations for Meech's group.