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Tue, 26 May 2020
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Cloud Lightning

Tropical Storm Chantal Forms in Atlantic

MIAMI - Tropical Storm Chantal formed Tuesday morning in the Atlantic Ocean between Bermuda and Massachusetts, but it was not expected to threaten the United States, forecasters said.

Cloud Lightning

Lightning kills 12 cattle

The carcasses of 12 cattle were airlifted from a valley in southern Austria after they were killed by a lightning storm.

Bizarro Earth

Mt. Bulusan explodes anew, spews 5-km high ash plume

Bulusan Volcano rumbled to life anew Tuesday, sending an ash plume as high as five kilometers high into the Sorsogon sky.

©AP
A column of ash and volcanic debris shooting up from the Mt. Bulusan volcano in the central Philippines on Tuesday.

©Phivolcs
A Bulusan ash explosion seen at 16:17 on 31 May 2006.

Bizarro Earth

Unnatural sea waves on India coast, cause of concern: Environmentalist

Waves crashing against the shore is nothing new for the inhabitants of two of Orissa's seaside tourist resorts---Puri and Gopalpur.

But what they have been witnessing for the last few months has come as a shock.

"The sea has been behaving in an unnatural manner with high waves lashing against the coast and damaging structures. It seems the sea is inching inside", said Jagannath Bastia, an environmental activist, who is a resident of the pilgrim town since long.

Cloud Lightning

China floods put Three Gorges Dam to the test

BEIJING - Flood waters are testing the safety of China's massive Three Gorges Dam and raising water levels on its longest river, the Yangtze, after weeks of flooding that have killed about 700 people, state media said on Tuesday.

Cloud Lightning

Pennsylvania man survives second lightning strike

Lightning can strike twice. Just ask Don Frick.

Frick says he survived his second lightning strike Friday - 27 years to the day of his first - and emerged a bit shaken, with only a burned zipper and a hole in the back of his jeans.

Bomb

Drip, drip of global warming spells change in northern Russia



©AFP

It is summer in this reindeer-herding village in northern Russia and with not an iceberg in sight, residents are acquiring a taste for bathing in the local river.

"We used to have ice on the river all year round. The warming process is speeding up," said the worried head of the state-controlled reindeer company at Kanchalan, Arkady Makhushkin.

"The reindeers' health is suffering. Their meat isn't so tasty," he said, explaining that the animals had to be herded greater distances to find cooler grazing grounds in upland areas.

Cloud Lightning

Storm warning announced in Siberia

Showers, occasionally heavy, thunderstorms and blasts of wind reaching 45 mph, are forecast in the Republics of Altai, Buryatia, the Chita, the Irkutsk, the Kemerovo, the Tomsk Regions and the Altai Territory.

Heavy showers are also expected in the central and southern districts of the Krasnoyarsk Territory. Hail and thunderstorms are possible, along with blasts of wind reaching 35-45 mph.

According to Siberian Regional Center of Ministry for Emergencies, the heaviest storm is forecast in the Republics of Tuva and Khakassia, where heavy showers, thunderstorms, hail, and blasts of wind reaching 60 mph, are expected.

Bulb

Climate Change Sucks Water From China's Two Longest Rivers

Climate change linked to the contraction of wetlands at the source of China's two longest rivers, the Yangtze and the Yellow River, has reduced the volume of water flowing in the rivers, said Chinese scientists. Scientists from the Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment under the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) studied changes over the past 40 years to the wetlands on the cold Qinghai-Tibet Plateau in west China where the two rivers have their source.

Analyzing aerial photos and satellite remote sensing figures, they found that the wetlands on the plateau have shrunk more than 10 percent over the past four decades. The wetlands at the origin of the Yangtze River suffered the most, contracting by 29 percent.

Cloud Lightning

Frequency of Atlantic hurricanes doubled over last century, climate change suspected

About twice as many Atlantic hurricanes form each year on average than a century ago, according to a new statistical analysis of hurricanes and tropical storms in the north Atlantic. The study concludes that warmer sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and altered wind patterns associated with global climate change are fueling much of the increase.

The study, by Greg Holland of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Peter Webster of Georgia Institute of Technology, will be published online July 30 in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London.

"These numbers are a strong indication that climate change is a major factor in the increasing number of Atlantic hurricanes," says Holland.

The analysis identifies three periods since 1900, separated by sharp transitions, during which the average number of hurricanes and tropical storms increased dramatically and then remained elevated and relatively steady. The first period, between 1900 and 1930, saw an average of six Atlantic tropical cyclones (or major storms), of which four were hurricanes and two were tropical storms. From 1930 to 1940, the annual average increased to 10, consisting of five hurricanes and five tropical storms. In the final study period, from 1995 to 2005, the average reached 15, of which eight were hurricanes and seven were tropical storms.