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Mon, 17 Jan 2022
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Poll: Most Americans Support Occupy Wall Street

National Journal's latest survey shows broad support for the protest movement and Democrats' plan to make the rich pay more
Occupy Wall Street

At a time when protests have erupted across the country over a growing inequality of wealth and Congress is considering measures to impose a surtax on those earning more than $1 million annually, the public seems to be in a populist mood--one that's tempered by skepticism about Washington's ability to do anything about the grim economy.

A new survey shows that Americans overwhelmingly support the self-styled Occupy Wall Street protests that not only have disrupted life in Lower Manhattan but also in Washington and cities and towns across the U.S. and in other nations. Some 59 percent of adults either completely agree or mostly agree with the protesters, while 31 percent mostly disagree or completely disagree; 10 percent of those surveyed didn't know or refused to answer.

What's more, many people are paying attention to the rallies. Almost two-thirds of respondents--65 percent--said they've heard "a lot" or "some" about the rallies, while 35 percent have said they've heard or seen "not too much" or "nothing at all" about the demonstrations.

The results appear in the latest edition of the United Technologies/National Journal Congressional Connection Poll.

Bad Guys

Muammar Gaddafi's grisly death raises questions the length of Libya's revolutionary road

The manner of Gaddafi's killing raises questions for the militias that make up the new Libya, writes Andrew Gilligan in Sirte.


The highway from Benghazi to Sirte was the Libyan revolution's battleground and success gauge: the road it drove up, retreated down, drove up again, then got stuck on for months; the road, this Thursday, on which it trapped and killed Colonel Muammar Gaddafi.

All along the revolutionary road, less than 48 hours after that final triumph, we found something unexpected: a smidgeon of sympathy for the dead dictator.

In Benghazi, on the main square where it all started, they were slaughtering camels in celebration. There they sat, eight of them, feet tied so they could not move, quivering with fear as they were beheaded one by one. As soldiers fired rifles in the air, members of the cheering crowd held up the severed heads as trophies. They daubed their hands in the camel-blood, and gave the V-for-victory sign with dripping fingers.

But away from the square, the birthplace of the revolution was not in party mood. The streets were fairly quiet. And in the cafes, people were watching TV pictures - more graphic than any shown in Britain - of a bloodied Gaddafi dragged along and beaten, feebly protesting, before a gun was put to his head.

The picture then cut to the dead ex-leader being rolled onto the pavement, blood pooling from the back of his skull.

Stormtrooper

US, Utah: Police pepper spray Haka dancers at football game


Police in a small Utah town are being accused of overreacting after using pepper spray to break up a group of Polynesian men and boys performing a traditional dance called the Haka after a high school football game.

The police action came after a pair of officers unsuccessfully attempted to disperse the dozen or so performers who were blocking an exit after the Union-Uintah game Thursday night, the Deseret News and Salt Lake Tribune reported.

A form of the Haka has been popularized by rugby players in New Zealand who chant, beat their chests and gesture aggressively before matches. The Maori tradition also can include fierce facial expressions. Haka are now performed at football and rugby games around the world.

The group in Roosevelt, a town of 8,000, had traveled about 125 miles east from the Salt Lake City area to watch a relative play his final game for Union, which lost to rival Uintah and finished the season without a victory.

Pistol

US, Georgia: Sheriff: Fort Gordon soldier kills deputy, self

police, crime scene
© unknown
Authorities say a Tennessee National Guardsman training at a Georgia military post shot and killed a sheriff's deputy, then committed suicide alongside a road.

Richmond County Sheriff Ronnie Strength said evidence shows 26-year-old Christopher Michael Hodges fired 35 rounds from his M4 semiautomatic rifle during the incident early Sunday morning. The Augusta Chronicle reports that Hodges and 47-year-old Deputy James D. Paugh were found dead on the side of Bobby Jones Expressway.

Hodges had been training at Fort Gordon.

Strength said Paugh was off duty and on his way home when he saw a suspicious car on the side of the road. He was shot several times when he stopped to check on the car and apparently fired two shots from his service weapon before he was killed.

Info

Life's Extremes: Tightwads vs. Spendthrifts

Infograph
© Karl Tate / Live Science

In the shop window gleams the coolest pair of shoes ever. Despite being able to afford them, some people will walk away, while others - though the purchase blows a hole in their personal finances - grab the kicks anyway.

We all have to spend money for necessities, such as groceries or rent. Occasionally, we also indulge on unhealthy treats and entertainment. Two contrary sorts of people, however, struggle to open their wallets even for things they really need - "tightwads" - while others can't stop their shopping sprees - "spendthrifts."

"Tightwads spend less than they should," said George Loewenstein, a professor of economics and psychology at Carnegie Mellon University. "They recognize that they should be spending more for their own wellbeing. The spendthrifts are the opposite. They spend more than they should spend by their own self-definition."

Studies have revealed a possible basis in the brain for why money burns a hole in some peoples' pockets while the mere thought of spending makes others grimace. Understanding why people under- and over-spend can help with ensuring they don't unduly burden themselves - or their bank accounts - when making a purchase.

Phoenix

Fire halts Swedish nuclear reactor

Image
© © AFP/ Paul Madej / Scanpix Sweden
Oskarshamn. Archivbild.
A nuclear reactor in the Swedish town of Oskarshamn was closed down on Saturday night after a fire broke out at the nuclear power plant, Sweden's newspaper Local reported on Sunday, referring to the plant's operator, OKG.

The fire broke out in the turbine hall of unit 2 and was quickly put out by the plant's own emergency services, after which the reactor and the turbine were closed down as a precautionary measure.

Stop

Dozens missing after Nepal bridge collapse

Image
© Agence France-Presse
Map showing location of the suspension bridge which collapsed in Nepal on Saturday
Rescuers were searching Saturday for more than 40 people, including a bus carrying Indian tourists, after an overloaded suspension bridge collapsed in southern Nepal, killing two people, police said.

Emergency personnel had managed to pull just four people alive from the fast-flowing Trishuli River and recovered the bodies of an Indian and a Nepali, said Gorkha district police officer Krishna Acharya.

"Two people have died when the suspension bridge over Trishuli river connecting Gorkha and Chitwan districts to the Prithvi Highway collapsed this afternoon (Saturday)," he said.

"There were 47 people on the bridge when it crashed and plunged into the river," he told AFP.

Stop

India: 31 killed, over 100 injured as wooden bridge collapses in Darjeeling

Image
© Unknown
At least 31 people have been killed and more than 100 injured as a wooden suspension bridge collapsed at Bijanbari, 40 kilometre from Darjeeling in West Bengal.

While 10 people died on the spot, the rest succumbed to their injuries in hospitals. The death toll may rise as some of those injured are critical.

Over a 100 people had gathered on the bridge to listen to the Gorkha Janmukti Morcha leaders. The pressure of the crowd led to the collapse of the bridge.

The suspension bridge was built in 1972. It was meant for pedestrians but over time was used by motorcycles which weakened it.

The Army's Mountain Brigade at Darjeeling has sent troops to the site for assistance.

The West Bengal government has announced a compensation of Rs. two lakh to the families of those killed.

Family

Class War in America

class warfare
© Unknown
Class war raged for decades. Business and America's super-rich always win. In his 1925 short story titled Rich Boy, F. Scott Fitzgerald said:
"Let me tell you about the very rich. They are different from you and me. They possess and enjoy early...They think, deep in their hearts, that they are better than we.."

"Even when they enter deep into our world....they still think that that they are better than we are. They are different."
In his article, titled "The Truth About 'Class War' in America," economist Richard Wolff said:
"The last 50 years have indeed seen continuous class warfare in and over federal economic policies."

Corporate giants and America's super-rich waged war against working Americans and won. Notably since the 1970s, "(b)usiness and its allies shifted most of its federal tax burden onto individuals."
Since WW II, tax rates on super-rich Americans fell from 91% to 35% today. Obama's deficit cutters want it lowered to 24% along with eliminating some deductions with loopholes to compensate and save others. Moreover, they want the top corporate tax rate slashed from 35% to 26%.

Many corporate giants, in fact, pay minimal or no taxes. Some, like General Electric, get generous rebates in highly profitable years. They game the system, benefiting form tax laws they write. American workers lose out from greater than ever burdens on them.

Bad Guys

Convicted pedophile shuffled between Scout troops in Canada, U.S.

Image
© Unknown
Richard Turley in his scouting uniform in the 1980s
A Scout leader, later convicted of numerous sexual assaults against children, was shuffled from a Scout group in central Victoria to a Sea Scout group in Cordova Bay, - about 10 kilometres across town - after regional Scout Canada leaders decided suspicions of abuse were not hard enough evidence to go to police.

Richard (Rick) Turley, 58, who was involved with Scouts in California and in Victoria through the 1970s and '80s and who spent years preying on victims in Victoria and other Vancouver Island communities, is a focal point of a widespread investigation by the CBC's The Fifth Estate and Los Angeles Times.

The investigation into Scouts in both Canada and the United State claims the organizations kept confidential lists of pedophiles.

In the 1980s, when Turley started volunteering with the 2nd Douglas Scout Group in Victoria, which met at Craigflower elementary school and included boys from the Gorge, View Royal, Burnside and Tillicum areas, had already had been convicted in the U.S. of kidnapping a boy he met through Scouts and served time in a state hospital as a "mentally disordered sex offender."