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Sun, 23 Oct 2016
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Health & Wellness


Setting the people up to die: A conspiracy of silence about swine flu natural remedies

It's emblazoned across the front page of USA Today, just underneath a subhead declaring Michael Jackson was, indeed, killed by a drug overdose: "Flu could infect half of USA." The article goes on to describe the predicted number of deaths expected in the U.S. (30,000 - 90,000 Americans) as well as the actions being taken by the government to protect Americans from the coming swine flu pandemic.

That advice reads sort of like a comic book of health care advice for kindergarteners: Wash your hands, cover your mouth if you cough and let "the grownups" take care of the rest by injecting you with a vaccine. Curiously absent from all the health advice being handed out on the swine flu by the White House, the CDC, the WHO and even the FDA is any mention of Vitamin D or other natural remedies that offer enormous protections from influenza infections.

The absence of this information from virtually all the advice being handed out to the American public is increasingly suspicious. If a pandemic flu is, indeed, threatening to infect half the U.S. population, and if most of the population is deficient in a nutrient known to strongly prevent influenza infections, wouldn't it make good sense to make a few announcements encouraging Americans to raise their vitamin D levels throughout the coming winter?


Getting Real About the High Price of Cheap Food

© Getty Images
Somewhere in Iowa, a pig is being raised in a confined pen, packed in so tightly with other swine that their curly tails have been chopped off so they won't bite one another. To prevent him from getting sick in such close quarters, he is dosed with antibiotics. The waste produced by the pig and his thousands of pen mates on the factory farm where they live goes into manure lagoons that blanket neighboring communities with air pollution and a stomach-churning stench. He's fed on American corn that was grown with the help of government subsidies and millions of tons of chemical fertilizer. When the pig is slaughtered, at about 5 months of age, he'll become sausage or bacon that will sell cheap, feeding an American addiction to meat that has contributed to an obesity epidemic currently afflicting more than two-thirds of the population. And when the rains come, the excess fertilizer that coaxed so much corn from the ground will be washed into the Mississippi River and down into the Gulf of Mexico, where it will help kill fish for miles and miles around. That's the state of your bacon - circa 2009.


Vitamin C Boosts Life Expectancy

A high intake of vitamin C is shown to improve life expectancy by six years. Not only does vitamin C help prevent the diseases that shorten life, but the vitamin itself has life sustaining properties. Vitamin C is known to help prevent heart attacks and strokes. It repairs blood vessels and helps reduce heart disease, which are the leading causes of death in the United States.

The vitamin C intake of more than eleven thousand Americans, aged of 25 to 74, was studied from 1971 to 1974. Then the participants were followed for another ten years. Those with the higher levels of serum (bloodstream) vitamin C lived longer. With only 300 mg a day, heart disease was reduced by 50 percent in men and about 40 percent in women. Those with higher levels of vitamin C in their blood lived six years longer than their counterparts.


Scientists Uncover Immune System's Role in Bone Loss

Finding could lead to new therapies for osteoporosis

Got high cholesterol? You might want to consider a bone density test.

A new UCLA study sheds light on the link between high cholesterol and osteoporosis and identifies a new way that the body's immune cells play a role in bone loss.

Published Aug. 20 in the journal Clinical Immunology, the research could lead to new immune-based approaches for treating osteoporosis. Affecting 10 million Americans, the disease causes fragile bones and increases the risk of fractures, resulting in lost independence and mobility.

Scientists have long recognized the relationship between high cholesterol and osteoporosis, but pinpointing the exact mechanism connecting the two has proved elusive.


Testosterone May Guide Women's Careers

Women often look back on mentors, family members or teachers as influences in their career decisions. But a new study found something as simple as testosterone levels may be nudging women into one career path over another.

A new study of 500 graduate business students showed that women with higher testosterone levels take more risks and are more likely to choose a finance career than women with low testosterone levels.

But testosterone levels made no difference in men's career choices in the study.


Clinical Depression Causes Early Malfunctions In The Brain's Pleasure Center, Study Shows

Clinically depressed individuals are less capable of finding pleasure in activities they previously enjoyed, a recent study has proven. Research featured in the August 26 issue of the NeuroReport shows reduced brain function in the reward center of the brain in depressed individuals, when compared to healthy subjects.

The study was conducted by Dr. Elizabeth Osuch, a researcher at the Lawson Health Research Institute, and is the first scientific publication of data obtained by the newly developed First Episode Mood & Anxiety Program (FEMAP) research arm at the London Health Sciences Centre in Ontario, Canada.


High blood pressure 'can increase risk of memory problems'

Patients with high blood pressure are more likely to develop memory problems in middle age than those who do not have the condition, according to a new study.

The research adds to growing evidence of a link between blood pressure and an early stage of dementia or even dementia itself.

Scientists found that people with high blood pressure were more likely to have problems with recall and other mental skills, signs of a condition called mild cognitive impairment.


Study will address sunscreen's possible link to Alzheimer's

Scientists are to investigate whether human-engineered nanoparticles which are found in sunscreen have any links with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

Professor Vyvyan Howard, a pathologist and toxicologist, and Dr Christian Holster, an expert in Alzheimer's, have been awarded £350,000 from the European Union to carry out a three-year research project.

Their study at the Biomedical Sciences Institute in Coleraine, Co Londonderry, is part of a worldwide project called NeuroNano, which also involves scientists at Dublin, Cork and Edinburgh universities, among others.


Wider Waist Boosts Asthma Risk

Even if women were of normal weight, extra fat around abdomen raised the odds, study found

Women with extra fat around their waists are more likely to develop asthma, even if they aren't overweight, a new study finds.

The California Teachers Study of more than 88,000 women found the same association between obesity and increased incidence of asthma that has been seen in other research, according to the Aug. 25 online report in the journal Thorax.

But it also found a 37 percent increased incidence of asthma among women with a waist circumference of 88 centimeters -- about 35 inches -- even if they were of normal weight.


Car Seats Can Limit Kids' Oxygen Supplies

Kids should be put in car seats only when traveling, not while sleeping or "hanging out" at home, child health experts warn.

That's because sitting upright in a car seat -- the position that's recommended -- can compress the chest and lead to lower levels of oxygen, according to a new study published online Aug. 24 in Pediatrics.

"There are people who have no baby beds and have their kids sleep in the car seat all the time," noted one expert, Dr. Iley Browning, an associate professor of pediatrics at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine. "That's not a good choice. And dropping oxygen levels are going to get worse when children have colds so you're making your child worse by putting them in a car seat when they're sick. And I guarantee that parents do this more when their child is sick."