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Sun, 28 May 2017
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HIV Infection Prematurely Ages the Brain

HIV infection or the treatments used to control it are prematurely aging the brain, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California-San Diego have found.

Blood flow in the brains of HIV patients is reduced to levels normally seen in uninfected patients 15 to 20 years older, scientists report online in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

"The graying of the AIDS patient community makes this infection's effects on the brain a significant source of concern," says first author Beau Ances, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of neurology at Washington University. "Patients are surviving into their senior years, and a number of them are coming forward to express concerns about problems they're having with memory and other cognitive functions."

Epidemiologists estimate that 14 percent to 18 percent of all AIDS patients in the United States are more than 50 years old. This age group also has one of the highest rates of new infection. If current trends continue, by the year 2015, their number will grow to more than 50 percent of the overall patient population.

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Brain Abnormalities in Parkinson's Patients Develop Before Symptoms Occur

Scientists who have identified brain networks damaged in Parkinson's disease have new evidence that these systems become abnormal a few years before symptoms appear. And what's more, parts of the network appear to respond in a last ditch attempt to rescue the brain.

"We were surprised," said Chris Tang, MD, PhD, a Parkinson's investigator at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research in Manhasset, NY, and an author of the study, published this month in the Journal of Neuroscience. The Feinstein scientists have been following people with Parkinson's disease for decades. They have had a unique opportunity to take snapshots of the brain over the course of four years in 15 patients and an equal number of normal volunteers. The group initially identified two discrete abnormal networks, one that was involved in mediating the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, and the other that regulates the cognitive dysfunction that develops in many patients with this illness.

Symptoms of Parkinson's disease initially occur on one side of the body, which provided scientists with a unique opportunity to study the brain scans at multiple times and compare the symptoms to changes in the brain networks over time. The idea for the latest study was to watch the activity of the network on the side of the brain that controls the side of the body that's free of symptoms. As the disease progresses, both sides of the body ultimately become involved.

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Vitamin D Supplementation Can Reduce Falls in Nursing Care Facilities

Giving people living in nursing facilities vitamin D can reduce the rate of falls, according to a new Cochrane Review. This finding comes from a study of many different interventions used in different situations. In hospitals, multifactorial interventions and supervised exercise programs also showed benefit.

Older people living in nursing facilities or who have been admitted to hospital are much more likely to suffer a fall than those living in the community. In these settings, falls fairly often result in head injuries and fractures, with rates of hip fracture more than ten times higher in nursing facilities than in the community. It is important to try to prevent falls to avoid unnecessary stress for older people and their families, and to reduce pressure on staff and resources. However, prevention is complicated as falls usually happen for several or many different reasons.

"Many of the preventive measures used to avoid falls in older people are combined in what are called multifactorial interventions, so it can be very difficult to separate out the effects of all the different measures," said lead researcher Ian Cameron, who is based at Sydney Medical School at the University of Sydney in Ryde, Australia.

Family

Emotions should be taken seriously

Health workers trained to take emotions more seriously may prevent depression among patients, a recent study at the University of Stavanger finds.

For most women, having a baby is a joyful experience. But it is not unusual for new mothers to be hit by grief, anxiety and depression. Global figures suggest that between 13 and 16 percent of women giving birth for the first time are struck by depression. For the second birth, figures boost to a worrying 30-40 percent.

Associate professor Kristin Akerjordet at the University of Stavanger, surveyed 250 postnatal women for her PhD thesis. Of the 30 women she interviewed, 15 had experienced depressive emotions in connection with pregnancy and birth.

"The health services often fail to recognise women who suffer from postnatal depression or anxiety. Many of the women I interviewed had experienced rejection and a lack of understanding from health personnel," Akerjordet says.

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Driven to Distraction: New Study Shows Driving Hinders Talking

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© Photo by L. Brian Stauffer, U. of I. News Bureau.
Gary Dell, a psycholinguist in the department of psychology at Illinois, and his colleagues found that young and old drivers lose about 20 percent of their ability to retain and retell a story while driving.
It is well known that having a conversation (for example on a cell phone) impairs one's driving. A new study indicates the reverse is also true: Driving reduces one's ability to comprehend and use language.

The findings, from researchers at the University of Illinois, appear in the journal Psychonomic Bulletin & Review.

This is the first study to find that driving impairs language skills, said Gary Dell, a psycholinguist in the department of psychology at Illinois and corresponding author on the study. Two previous studies had reported that driving did not impair the accuracy and comprehension of speech.

"The previous findings made no sense to those of us who have studied language," Dell said. "You might think that talking is an easy thing to do and that comprehending language is easy. But it's not. Speech production and speech comprehension are attention-demanding activities, and so they ought to compete with other tasks that require your attention - like driving."

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Blueberry Boosts Memory

Scientists have found evidence suggesting that blueberries may help improve memory in older adults because of its antioxidative phytochemicals, according to a new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Previous animal studies have suggested that eating blueberries may boost memory in older people, according to Robert Krikorian, author of the current study; he and colleagues from the University of Cincinnati worked in conjunction with several other organizations on the research.

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U.S. newborns are weighing less, study finds

Average birth weights have dropped slightly from 1990 to 2005. Researchers are unclear why.

Birth weights in the United States are on the decline, a study has found. The report, released Thursday, found a small but significant decrease in average birth weights from 1990 to 2005, for reasons that scientists say are unclear.

The numbers, published in the February issue of the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, mark a shift from earlier reports that noted a rise in birth weights in the latter part of the 20th century.

They also seem to go against conventional wisdom, experts said. In recent years, women have gotten larger, are smoking less and are older when they have children, all factors that contribute to higher birth weight in offspring.

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Psychopaths - They Prey on All of Us

He constantly asks for sympathy, takes risks, lies to you and when caught shows no remorse. It is unsettling, frightening. Somehow it is your own fault. But why would anyone do these things? There is an answer.

The terms, "psychopathy", "sociopath" and others refer to individuals who look human but, in elemental ways, are not. They harbor a condition which cuts them off from us. Their automatic emotional reactions, foundational to limiting wrong behavior, do not exist. These individuals emulate compassion, concern, affection, kindness and love only to further their purposes. They feel no compunction about stealing, lying, or committing crimes to achieve their goals. They consistently demand sympathy, knowing perfectly well they deserve none.

They do not want or need sympathy. But they do need you to feel sorry for them, to want to help them. It is all manipulation, emotions emulated to get what they want. They know we feel sorry for them and project the existence of emotions they never feel, just another lie.

Comment: SOTT hopes that Ms. Pillsbury-Foster will spend a few more years digging into this subject as we have. What IS important to note is that many more people are becoming aware that psychopaths are like a cancer in society.


Attention

Girl, 19, left battling blindness after taking Tamiflu (and she didn't even have swine flu)

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© Unknown
Disabled: Samantha Millard had an allergic reaction to Tamiflu which left her blistered and battling blindness
A teenage girl left disabled by the swine flu treatment Tamiflu did not even have the virus, it was revealed today.

Samantha Millard, 19, became critically ill after suffering a severe allergic reaction to the tablets, which she took on the advice of the controversial NHS helpline.

Within 72 hours of taking three pills, doctors put her on life support.

Samantha spent a month in hospital after developing the life-threatening Stevens Johnson syndrome, which causes the skin to peel off, and later developed toxic epidermal necrolysis syndrome, which has damaged her sight.

Ambulance

Copper pipes 'could cause Alzheimer's and heart disease in people over 50'

Copper pipes could cause people over 50 to contract Alzheimer's and place them at risk of heart disease, a new study has found.

Scientists have warned people to remove old copper pipes from their homes because the metal has been shown to build up in their bodies and cause serious health problems.

The found that tiny traces of copper from pipes mix with tap water and are then consumed by people.

Over a long period of time this leads to a build up of copper in the body which then led to Alzheimer's disease, heart disease and diabetes because the body cannot process the metal.