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Fri, 30 Sep 2022
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Jolt Delayed in Third of Cardiac Arrests

NEW YORK - Just because you're in the hospital doesn't mean you'll quickly get treated if your heart stops beating. About one-third of patients don't get a potentially live-saving shock within the recommended two minutes, a new study found.

Ambulance

CDC Tries To Find Those Who Were Near TB Infected Women On Flight 293

On December 13th a woman who was sick with TB (tuberculosis) flew on American Airlines Flight 293 from New Delhi, India, to Chicago, USA. She then took another plane from Chicago to San Francisco.

Health

Listeria Warning To Massachusetts Milk Consumers

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health on 27th December issued a warning to consumers who bought Whittier Farms dairy foods not to consume any of their milk products for the time being because there is a risk they could be contaminated with listeria bacteria.

©Chestnut Labs
Listeria

Star

Congressman Murtha: Championing Blinded Soldiers

Schepens Eye Research Institute has named Congressman John P. Murtha, Chairman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense, this year's Man of Vision for his advocacy on behalf of veterans blinded by war and for research to restore their vision.

Star

It's about time: ADA Issues New Clinical Practice Recommendations

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) issued its annual Clinical Practice Recommendations to help health care providers treat people with diabetes using the most current evidence available.

©Unknown

Heart

Bittersweet Vindication for Atkins Diet

After decades of ridicule by the American medical establishment, it's fittingly ironic that Dr. Robert Atkins had his epitaph published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Atkins, who died on April 17 at age 72, spent most of his life advocating a diet low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein. The May 22 issue of the journal contained two studies that examined the effects of such low-carbohydrate diets.

©Gina Triplett
Cutting out the carbs

Both studies were led by Penn faculty and both offered a qualified vindication of the Atkins approach, concluding that it is an effective weight-loss regimen and - to the authors' surprise - a safe way to reduce cardiac-risk factors.

Wine

Drink up - New Research On Resveratrol Reveals Benefit In Curbing Insulin Resistance

According to a new study, resveratrol, an antioxidant found in red wine, may counter type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance.

©Unknown

Bulb

Language centers revealed, brain surgery refined with new mapping

Neurosurgeons from the University of California, San Francisco are reporting significant results of a new brain mapping technique that allows for the safe removal of tumors near language pathways in the brain. The technique minimizes brain exposure and reduces the amount of time a patient must be awake during surgery.

Perhaps even more profound, the study provides new data that refines scientists' understanding of how language is organized within the human cortex. It identifies new regions involved in speech production, reading and naming. The team used this data to generate a three-dimensional cortical language map that is more detailed and integrates more data than any language map of the brain ever generated.

Magic Wand

The risk of osteoarthritis and index to ring finger length ratio

Study associates shorter second than fourth digit with independent risk for knee osteoarthritis, especially among women

Index to ring finger length ratio (2D:4D) is a trait known for its sexual differences. Men typically have shorter second than fourth digits; in women, these fingers tend to be about equal in length. Smaller 2D:4D ratios have intriguing hormonal connections, including higher prenatal testosterone levels, lower estrogen concentrations, and higher sperm counts. Reduction in this ratio has also been linked to athletic and sexual prowess. Whether this trait affects the risk of osteoarthritis (OA), a progressive joint disease associated with both physical activity and estrogen deficiency, has not been examined. Until recently.

Health

MRI techniques evolving towards better assessment of liver fibrosis

MRI imagery is emerging as a non-invasive way to determine the existence and extent of hepatic fibrosis. It could eventually help the development of pharmacologic strategies to combat the condition. These findings are in the January issue of Hepatology, a journal published by John Wiley & Sons on behalf of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD). The article is also available online at Wiley Interscience.

Currently, the best way to assess hepatic fibrosis is liver biopsy; however, it is an invasive procedure that can cause serious side effects. Researchers have been studying less invasive techniques, such as blood tests and imaging strategies like ultrasound, but so far, they have not proven sensitive enough to detect the various stages of fibrosis.

Over the past decade, a number of technological advances have been made in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the liver. Researchers led by Jayant Talwalkar of the Mayo Clinic, examined the current state of MR imaging and the studies that looked at its utility in detecting liver fibrosis.