Ghislaine Maxwell court
© Reuters
A little black book belonging to Ghislaine Maxwell could provide 'compelling evidence of her guilt'.

US prosecutors claim the contacts book - labelled Government Exhibit 52 - contains potentially incriminating information including the names of her alleged victims.

The document has emerged just days before Maxwell faces a six week trial at federal court in New York over alleged abuse, procurement of young women and trafficking crimes dating back decades.

She faces more than 80 years in jail if convicted on all charges.

Ian Maxwell, 65, Ghislaine's older brother, has said one of her six siblings will support her in court each day.
maxwell family

From left to right: Anne 73, Kevin 62, Twins: Isabel & Christine 70, Philip 71, Ian 64 and in front Ghislaine 59 Taken in London 10 June 2019
Maxwell's lawyers have been attempting to strike out the contacts book as evidence, the Sunday Times reported.

The 97-page directory is allegedly similar to Epstein's 'black book' which contained the details of Donald Trump and Prince Andrew.

It was taken from Epstein's Palm Beach mansion, dubbed 'Pleasure Palace', by former butler Alfredo Rodriguez who tried to sell it for $50,000 in 2009.

Court papers say it has 'contact information for victims who interacted with the defendant during the relevant time period' and 'is compelling evidence of her guilt'.

Maxwell's lawyers claim the document is 'an unauthenticated hearsay document from suspect sources'.

It comes as the victims of billionaire paedophile Jeffrey Epstein have questioned why other women who acted as 'groomers and recruiters' are not also on trial with Ghislaine Maxwell.

Later this month, one of the women the victims say acted as Epstein's 'groomers and recruiters' will testify against Maxwell.

It emerged the identities of these two other women are being protected and they are allegedly working with the US government.

Prosecutors will say Maxwell, 59, had three 'accomplices' - Epstein and the two unidentified women who supposedly received big salaries and perks.

She asked that the 'co-conspirators' were named by prosecutors to prevent her from being ambushed at her trial, the Telegraph reported.

'It doesn't seem right that only Maxwell is in the dock,' one victim said.

'There were others who facilitated the abuse and this makes it seem like it was only her.'

'[The 'co-conspirators' were] intimately involved in the scheme to lure young girls to Epstein's mansion,' said a lawyer representing another of the victims.

Evidence comes in the form of emails between Maxwell and one of the 'co-conspirators'.

Her lawyers, commenting on the contents of the emails, said: 'This court should reject the belated, insufficient, improper argument that the emails are direct evidence of the charge of conspiracy.'

Maxwell faces a six week trial at federal court in New York.

Her lawyers are expected to argue she is being punished by proxy for Epstein's heinous crimes because, as one source close to the case maintains, 'someone has to pay for what he did'.

From 1994 to 2004, she allegedly 'facilitated and contributed' to the abuse of children by her ex-boyfriend, the convicted paedophile Jeffrey Epstein.

The youngest alleged victim was just 14 at the time she claims she was sexually assaulted by Maxwell.

Four women, one British, are listed in the indictment although only American Annie Farmer has waived her anonymity.
Annie Farmer and her sister Maria Farmer
© Netflix
(L to R) Annie Farmer and her sister Maria Farmer
Farmer claims Maxwell posed as a 'big sister' figure before molesting her at Epstein's New Mexico ranch in 1996. She called Maxwell 'a sexual predator who has never shown any remorse'.

Maxwell denies all the charges.

Prince Andrew's accuser Virginia Roberts is expected to attend the trial and may give evidence. She has described Maxwell as 'pure evil', saying: 'Epstein was a sick paedophile but Maxwell was the mastermind.'

Another alleged victim said: 'We thought she [Maxwell] was Mary Poppins because she acted like she was our friend and had that lovely English accent.

'But she turned out to be a monster in designer clothing. She lured us in. She knew exactly what she was doing. I hope she rots in hell.'

In a world exclusive interview with The Mail on Sunday after her $28million (£21M) bail application was denied for the fourth time, Maxwell claimed negative media coverage while she has been in custody and the deliberate withholding of evidence have made it 'impossible' for her to receive a fair trial.

Speaking from her 10ft by 12ft prison cell inside New York's notorious Metropolitan Detention Center, where she has spent the past 16 months in solitary confinement, she said: 'I'm overwhelmed by feelings of sadness and shock at the grotesque and untrue narratives that are total fabrication and bear no resemblance to reality.


Comment: The above sentence was taken out of context from a disturbing interview Maxwell recently did with the Mail on Sunday. It mostly consisted of Maxwell complaining about her prison conditions and also described the development of a 'dark sense of humour' behind bars.

It's unclear whether she was feeling overwhelming sadness after "falsely" being dubbed a socialite or due to the press coverage which could bias the jury. Either way, there's no mention of sadness for the victims:
Her greatest fear is not being able to find an impartial jury. Coverage of the case in the US remains relentless, with her being referred to as 'Epstein's madam' and 'Epstein's socialite partner-in-crime'.

She objects: 'Being tagged a 'socialite' feels derogatory and sexist, designed to paint me in a negative light. I've worked my entire life, starting with part-time jobs when I was 15. No man who had a similar professional career would be called a socialite. I'm overwhelmed by feelings of sadness and shock at the grotesque and untrue narratives that are total fabrication and bear no resemblance to reality.

'I'm terrified the overwhelmingly negative coverage will poison my jury pool and affect the outcome of my trial, despite the evidence which I feel confident will prove my innocence. I look forward to having my day in court to prove I played no part in Epstein's crimes. I am innocent.'



'I'm terrified the overwhelmingly negative coverage will poison my jury pool and affect the outcome of my trial, despite the evidence which I feel confident will prove my innocence.

'I look forward to having my day in court to prove I played no part in Epstein's crimes. I am innocent.'

Friday marked the latest development in the Epstein saga, as the Duke of York faces a US lawsuit from Virginia Roberts Giuffre who claims she was forced to have sex with Andrew.

The Duke of York also faced a fresh headache this week when campaigners and experts warned his finances should be investigated by MPs and tax authorities.

Prince Andrew faced mounting scrutiny on Tuesday over whether he broke the Royal Family's conduct rules by accepting a £1.5million off-shore payment from Tory donor and long-term friend David Rowland.

The Queen's scandal-hit second son received the payment days before he paid off a loan from the financier's own Luxembourg bank.

Buckingham Palace conduct rules state that royals should 'never accept gifts of money, or money equivalent, in connection with an official engagement or duty'.

See the full story here.