Samuel Moyn

One of the most influential contemporary historians and professor at Yale University, Samuel Moyn, says that during the bombing of Yugoslavia, he worked at the White House as an intern and “planted” stories that were published in the Washington Post.
"It was about selling the war and explaining its virtues. My moment of clarity came a little later", says Moyn.

He said he wanted internationalism to coincide with the awakening of progressive policies, but that it was only after the Iraq war that he realised that his actions in his twenties would have dire consequences.

"My writing on human rights is also a way of self-reflection on all these events," says Moyn, who has written four books on human rights.

He states that, at the time of the bombing of the FRY, he had the task of "public diplomacy" - to serve up some facts to the media about the war.

"Of course I did not publish all the facts, but only those that were favourable to our presentation of the war. The problem is, there were few journalists researching their own facts independently. In Vietnam, journalists went scouting more for their own exclusive truth, which is not the case with the wars waged by American today", the professor said.

He also believes that it is true that the bombing of Yugoslavia did not have its own Seymour Hersh who, through his research, overthrew the dominant narrative of the Vietnam War.

Moyn also spoke about the fact that interventions in the world happen without the support of the UN. He says that since 1989 any restrictions on wars by the great powers have diminished.

"It's especially true when a permanent member of the Security Council is wages war, like Russia in the Crimea or the US. I think American exceptionalism cares less about peace and more about humanity. Americans worry about how prisoners will be treated or how many civilians are killed by drones, but they do not appear to care about endless war as such. This is something new... ", Moyn suggests.


Comment: Crimea voted to join Russia, compare that with the US death count in the Middle East.


He also believes that there have been few successful humanitarian interventions in the world that have helped reduce problems and suffering. In this regard, politicians have failed.

Moyn also maintains that the intellectuals in the 90s failed to see what was really going on, which was the awakening of the imperial world after the end of the bilateral Cold War regime.

"Intellectuals have contributed to the myth that there will be a moral end to history. Today we can see that darker forces were at work", the historian concludes.
Miroslav Krstić offers this translation of a piece by Tanjug which appeared on Vidovdan.

Read the original source (in Serbian) here: vidovdan.org/info/americki-istoricar-priznao-sta-je-radio-1999-sejao-sam-price-da-bi-nato-mogao-da-bombarduje-srbiju/