Welcome to Sott.net
Fri, 09 Dec 2022
The World for People who Think

Extreme Temperatures

Info

Frozen barley crops will raise craft beer prices higher in N. America

Image
Beer prices in North America may rise next year as brewers and maltsters face higher costs after cold, wet weather damaged Canadian barley crops and left farmers and tipplers crying in their beer.

Canada, the world's second-biggest exporter of malting barley, was already harvesting its smallest crop since 1968, before a recent dump of snow and freezing temperatures in Alberta, the biggest barley-growing province.

The shortage will hit craft brewers the hardest, since they typically keep less malt inventory on hand than larger breweries that are also better able to absorb costs.

"Prices (going) up means our costs go up and beer prices ultimately go up," said Neil Herbst, co-owner of Edmonton-based Alley Kat Brewery. "Any small brewery is going to be exposed."

With supplies tight, the premium maltsters pay for high-quality malting barley has grown and that cost will pass along to brewers who are not protected by long-term supply contracts.

Craft brewers, the small breweries that are independently owned, typically have shorter-term supply contracts than big brewers to buy malt, which is a product made from germinating and drying cereal grains.

Snowflake Cold

Signs of the Ice Age - summers shorten in Norway

Image
When it was warmer in the past decade we were told the shortening winters and longer summers were a sign of man made global warming. Now it seems Summers are shortening in the Northern Hemisphere with early snow on both sides of the Atlantic just as the marionettes march world wide to warn of us of the dangers of a [non] warming world many of whom were either not born or too young to remember when we had a wild jet stream. [emphasis added]

Snowflake Cold

Record snowfall for North Karelia, Finland in September

Image
© Juha Parviainen
Villagers in Ilomantsi, eastern Finland, woke to find their cars underneath 25 centimetres of snow on Tuesday.
Thick snowfall covers eastern Finland

Heavy snow fell in parts of North Karelia during Monday night and Tuesday morning, along the border with Russia.

Residents in the small town of Ilomantsi, the easternmost in Finland, woke up to find a blanket of over 25 cm (10 inches) of snow. Authorities warned that roads in the area are very slippery and said there have been reports of minor collisions.

Snowy conditions are forecast to continue into the week.

Chalkboard

On the Information Superhighway, there's no such thing as a true science denier

Image
© Tinadupuy.com
Science isn't like religion in that you can't just pick and choose the science you don't concur with. You can't, say, believe in evolution, but not for species you think are gross. Or think gravity is a sound theory but it only pertains to left-handed Oregonians. Or accept atomic theory but only for people named Adam.

You get the idea; that's not by definition scientific. If you trust in the rigors of science: evidence, testing, peer review etc. - you're used to the fact that science is completely indifferent to your feelings. Yes, we all want the sun to revolve around the Earth and for plastic to be nutritious for sea creatures, but in science, wishing it were true doesn't make it so.

Religion, on the other hand, gets to be custom fitted. You can be a Christian and if you don't like the part in the Bible about being happy when smashing babies against rocks (Psalms 137:9), you can just ignore it. Or if you no longer think it's kosher to even say publicly, "I do not permit a woman to teach or to assume authority over a man; she must be quiet (1 Timothy 2:12)," you can be mum on that one too. Disagree with slavery? No problem. Want to wear something besides linen? That's fine. Go to Red Lobster religiously? Still OK.

Islam is the same in that respect. President Obama said ISIS, the insanely well-funded terrorist group (who are also don't believe in evolution), isn't Islamic. This is how sectarian wars start - one group degrading the piety of another group claiming to be more pure/better/cleaner/uncorrupted then they are. Instead of a holy war about whose god is better, it's a splinter fight over whom god likes more.

Comment: The author should take her own advice and support real science instead of Zombie science. The data and research behind global cooling and an impending ice age is growing and growing.

Below is a definition of Zombie science from Not even trying... The Corruption of real science:
When a branch of science based on incoherent, false or phoney theories is serving a useful but non-scientific purpose it may be kept-going by continuous transfusions of cash from those whose non-scientific interests it serves.

For example, if a branch of pseudo-science based on a phoney theory is nonetheless valuable for political purposes (e.g. to justify a government intervention such as a new tax) or for marketing purposes (to provide the rationale for a marketing campaign) then real science expires and a 'zombie science' evolves.

Zombie science is science that is dead but will not lie down. It keeps twitching and lumbering around so that (from a distance, and with your eyes half-closed) zombie science looks much like real science.

But in fact the zombie has no life of its own; it is animated and moved only by the incessant pumping of funds.

*
Real science is coherent - and testable (testing being a matter of checking coherence with the result of past and future observations).

Real science finds its use, and gets its validation, from common sense evaluation and being deployed in technology.

Real science is validated (contingently) insofar as it leads to precise predictions that later come true; and leads to new ways of solving pressing problems and making useful changes in the world.

But zombie science is not coherent, therefore cannot be tested; its predications are vague or in fact retrospective summaries rather than predictions.

*
In a nutshell, zombie science is supported because it is useful propaganda; trading on the prestige which real science used-to have and which zombie science falsely claims for itself.

Zombie science is deployed in arenas such as political rhetoric, public administration, management, public relations, marketing and the mass media generally. It persuades, it constructs taboos, it buttresses rhetorical attempts to shape opinion.

Furthermore, most zombie sciences are supported by moral imperatives - to doubt the zombie science is therefore labelled as wicked, reckless, a tool of sinister and destructive forces.

To challenge zombie science is not merely to attack the livelihoods of zombie scientists (which, considering their consensus-based power, is itself dangerous) - but opens the attacker to being labelled a luddite, demagogue, anti-science, a denialist!

For all its incoherence and scientific worthlessness, zombie science therefore often comes across in the sound bite world of the mass media as being more plausible than real science; and it is precisely the superficial face-plausibility which in actuality is the sole and sufficient purpose of zombie science.
Climate Science is Zombie Science


Snowflake Cold

Burlington NY temperatures reach freezing mark for first time since 1964

Image
© Fox44/ABC22
Low temperatures versus records
In Burlington the temperature reached the freezing mark for the earliest time in the season since 1964! That data is according to the National Weather Service in Burlington.

Low temperatures dropped into the 20s and 30s across the area and broke/tied records in some cases. A record low was established in Massena, NY for Thursday and Friday. A record low was tied for Friday in Burlington and St. Johnsbury. These temperatures were 10-20 degrees below average for this time of the year!

It means the end of the growing season for 2014 for many. This is particularly early to see this kind of cold weather. Typically the Champlain Valley does not get frost until the first week of October. However this year for the Champlain Valley it has come nearly three weeks early.

Attention

Rare Arctic muskox spotted in northern Manitoba

Image
© Dan Wettlaufer
Manitoba hunters spotted a muskox, similar to the one pictured here, near Tadoule Lake recently and reported it to Manitoba Conservation. It's the first sighting in over a century in this province. This is a photograph of a muskox spotted at the Northwest Territories-Alberta border two years ago.
Conservationists are thrilled to hear hunters in northern Manitoba have spotted a muskox.

Hunters from Tadoule Lake told provincial officials last week they spotted a muskox from their canoe during a hunting trip.

Manitoba Conservation biologist Bill Watkins said the animal hasn't been seen in this province since the late 1800s.

While there are 75,000 muskox in the north, the Arctic animals named for the strong smell they give off during the rutting season, disappeared from this province during the fur trade.

Snowflake Cold

Killing freeze, widespread frost to seize the Northeast U.S. later this week

The chilliest air of the season so far will settle over much of the Northeast Thursday into Friday and will bring frost to more areas than experienced frost early this week.

Image
The pattern through this week will bring cooler-than-average temperatures to the region with a reinforcing push of cool air forecast to settle in Thursday night and Friday.

Where skies become clear and winds diminish Thursday night over the interior, the stage will be set for a frost and even a freeze in the coldest locations.

Ice Cube

4 U.S. States hit with September snow - Parts of Wyoming, South Dakota, Montana and Colorado hit by snowstorm that dumped 20 inches of snow

As summertime draws to a close across the country, a snowstorm has hit parts of Wyoming dumping up to 20 inches of snow. The freak summer snowstorm hit parts of Wyoming, South Dakota, Montana and Colorado and left a blanket of snow on the ground as temperatures plummeted to 20 degrees Fahrenheit.
Image
© AP
Clean up: Terry Chandler clears snow off her car before heading to work on Thursday in Gillette, Wyoming

Children took full advantage of the unseasonably cold weather building snowmen in the local park and amusing themselves by pelting each other with snowballs. Forecasters said that the storm was heaviest on Wednesday and Thursday.

Meanwhile, much of northern Wyoming received early-season snow on Thursday, ranging from flurries at lower elevations to as much as 10 inches in mountain areas. Big Horn Mountains, the town of Buffalo saw as much as 10 inches and Custer, South Dakota was blanketed with up to eight inches. Up to 3 to 5 inches fell in Cody, the earliest recorded snowfall there since records were kept in 1915.

Some roads and highways were slippery on Friday morning, but travel was not hampered in Wyoming. However, the heavy wet snow did snap off tree branches and cause some power outages in Buffalo.

Additional images

Ice Cube

Professor Bob Carter warns of unpreparedness for imminent global cooling

Image
Eric Worrall writes:

Professor Bob Carter, writing in today's edition of The Australian, a major Aussie daily newspaper, warns that the world is unprepared for imminent global cooling, because of the obsession of policy makers with global warming.

According to Bob Carter;
Heading for ice age

"GRAHAM Lloyd has reported on the Bureau of Meteorology's capitulation to scientific criticism that it should publish an accounting of the corrections it makes to temperature records ("Bureau warms to transparency over adjusted records", 12/9). Corrections which, furthermore, act to reinforce the bureau's dedication to a prognosis of future dangerous global warming, by turning cooling temperature trends into warming ones - a practice also known to occur in the US, Britain and New Zealand.

Meanwhile, we have a report by Sue Neales that the size of our grain harvest remains in doubt following severe frosts in southern NSW killing large areas of early wheat crops and also damaging wheat and canola crops in South Australia and Victoria ("Trifecta of calamities to deplete. crop harvest", 12/9)

Is it unreasonable to be surprised that none of your writers, much less the government, has noticed that leading solar astrophysicists, such as Habibullo Abdussamatov from Pulkovo Observatory in St Petersburg, have for years been commenting on the declining activity of the sun?

These scientists are projecting a significant cooling over the next three decades, and perhaps even the occurrence of another little ice age.

Obsessed as they are with a gentle global warming trend that stopped late last century, should the expected solar cooling eventuate, policy makers will rue the day they failed to heed the advice of independent scientists on climate change issues."
Heading for ice age

Phoenix

California firefighters battle out of control wildfire as area withers under triple-digit temperatures

wildfire
© AFP
Los Angeles - Hundreds of firefighters spent a second day on Saturday battling a wildfire burning out of control in a national forest southeast of Los Angeles, as the region baked under triple-digit temperatures that prompted authorities to issue a "heat alert."

The so-called Silverado Fire, which broke out in the Cleveland National Forest on Friday morning, had charred some 1,600 acres (647 hectares) by Saturday afternoon as it burned through brush and chaparral left bone dry by California's record drought.

Evacuation orders were issued for more than 200 homes in and around Silverado Canyon as some 740 firefighters worked to gain a measure of control over the flames, assisted by 10 water-dropping helicopters and five fixed-wing aircraft, according to the U.S Forest Service fire-tracking website InciWeb.

The heat wave that has sent temperatures soaring over 100 Fahrenheit (38 Celsius) in parts of Southern California on Saturday and was not expected to break until late Sunday. The sweltering heat prompted Los Angeles health officials to issue a "heat alert" for this weekend, urging residents to take special precautions.

"Extreme heat such as this is not just an inconvenience, it can be dangerous and even deadly, but we can protect ourselves, our families and our neighbors if we take steps to remain cool and hydrated," Dr. Jeffrey Gunzenhauser, the city's interim health director, said in issuing the heat alert.